By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Which books

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
richardandtracy12/08/2018 22:09:39
avatar
938 forum posts
10 photos

Think that at the moment home CNC is in a pretty immature state compared to other branches of the hobby, and is changing rapidly enough to date very quickly. Think of the advent in the last couple of years of the little self contained controllers, the Arduino and the PlanetCNC type controllers all changing so rapidly that a book would become out of date while being written. The same applies to 3D printing, only more so.

Regards,

Richard.

Nick Clarke 312/08/2018 22:17:25
avatar
555 forum posts
14 photos

Dunno about 3d printing as I only have experience of my own machine, but I was teaching CNC in school in g code using a small CNC lathe attached to a BBC computer in the late 1980s

Derek Lane13/08/2018 08:38:57
avatar
307 forum posts
70 photos

 

#Posted by merlin on 11/08/2018 23:10:19:

Derek Lane 2, I am never going to extract any more from my 1948 edition of Sparey's The Amateur's Lathe so I will give it to you if you pay the postage.

I live in North Norfolk - is this anywhere near you?

How do we do this i.e. please explain how you and I exchange details privately.

Again thank you every one have been a little busy over the weekend with preparing for an event on saturday and out at it all day yesterday totally shattered.

Merlin thank you very much and I have sent a PM to you. I am down in Canterbury.

I will be looking at the Tubal Cain's book as well as the workshop series as I stated earlier

Edited By Derek Lane 2 on 13/08/2018 08:39:39

thaiguzzi13/08/2018 10:54:37
avatar
646 forum posts
131 photos
Posted by Carl Wilson 4 on 10/08/2018 16:43:10:
LH Sparey's book is very good. Most of what he talks about in the book is done on Drummonds, so seems like a good book for the smaller lathe.

Lathework, a Complete Course, by Harold Hall is also very good. It's a Workshop Practice series title. I too have Chapman, from over 30 years ago in training and still excellent.

I'm going to suggest something else that is not a book. Machining is inherently practical. Watch some of the you tube machining channels.

In my opinion the best one is a guy called Doubleboost. He is British and he is very down to earth and does some interesting projects. His channel is Sunday Night Night Cap. Puts out a new video every Sunday. The old ones are all archived. Highly recommend - equal worth to reading several books.

+1, concur.

But i would add the two American channels Abom79 and Keith Fenner's Turnwright machining. Both always very interesting.

merlin14/08/2018 17:48:21
141 forum posts
1 photos

When I first bought a lathe I wondered what do do with it, what direction to go. I settled on the writings and works of Geoge H. Thomas. I spend the first year or two making tools to his designs and following his 'words and music', all in 'Model Engineer' or M.E.W.

I used scraps bits of metal and bought only two or three rough castings.

No regrets.

John McNamara16/08/2018 00:58:47
avatar
1311 forum posts
113 photos

To learn lathework. milling Welding etc from a professional Abom79 on Youtube is a very good starting point, Most of the work he does is industrial so rather large but the same rules apply to the small workshop.

You can search youtube for Machinists to find many more... some good some not so good.

Hopper16/08/2018 08:45:01
avatar
4116 forum posts
89 photos

I'm a big fan of George H. Thomas's books and articles too. He knew his stuff (machinist by trade I believe) and wrote clearly and in an engaging manner.

XD 35116/08/2018 09:43:12
avatar
1409 forum posts
1 photos

Just to add to what John mentioned with youtube , one of the best channels for the beginner is " that lazy machinists " - i have watched many hundreds of videos on machining and as far as i'm concerned the videos by Marc on his channel are the best for a beginner probably followed by mr pete 222 and guess what they were both metalwork / shop teachers !

Model engineering a foundation course by Peter Wright is a pretty good jumping off point before moving on to more dedicated literature for the lathe or mill .

What if find a lot is many want to read a book or watch a video about using a lathe or mill but forget the basics that should be learned first - things like

Workshop safety .

Basic marking out .

Measuring .

Cutting , filing and shaping by hand .

Drilling and tapping threads .

The lathe or mill should be an extension of your skills - not replace them !

Michael Gilligan16/08/2018 10:03:32
avatar
14944 forum posts
638 photos

Now that 'books' has developed to embrace YouTube ...I recommend this:

Improving the vertex rotary table - Part 1

**LINK**

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DTRc5B1HcRc

.

I have just started watching this set of videos, and it promises to cover a lot of useful ground.

MichaelG.

Derek Lane16/08/2018 12:20:31
avatar
307 forum posts
70 photos

Thank you for all the tips reference u tube I have found many which I have found most interesting. But I do enjoy a good old fashioned paper copy to read especially for bed time reading.

At present I am collecting some of the smaller hand tools many that I already have are from my days as a plant mechanic as well as some of the smaller ones from modelling model boats which is where my wanting to go into live steam.

How I ended up doing woodwork as a hobby I don't know and like model engineering the list of tools required seems to get longer rather than shorter.

As they say a long and slippery slope ahead

Posted by merlin on 14/08/2018 17:48:21:

When I first bought a lathe I wondered what do do with it, what direction to go. I settled on the writings and works of Geoge H. Thomas. I spend the first year or two making tools to his designs and following his 'words and music', all in 'Model Engineer' or M.E.W.

I used scraps bits of metal and bought only two or three rough castings.

No regrets.

I already seem to be collecting pieces of metal purely for the use of practicing with

Howard Lewis17/08/2018 20:59:42
2876 forum posts
2 photos

The only scrap metal in the world is either too small to hold, or is already in the form of swarf!

Even short lengths can be made into spacers.

Anything else "Will come in handy", one day (which may be years ahead!)

My disease has now been officially recognised ; hoarding!

Howard

Derek Lane17/08/2018 21:47:27
avatar
307 forum posts
70 photos
Posted by Howard Lewis on 17/08/2018 20:59:42:

The only scrap metal in the world is either too small to hold, or is already in the form of swarf!

Even short lengths can be made into spacers.

Anything else "Will come in handy", one day (which may be years ahead!)

My disease has now been officially recognised ; hoarding!

Howard

You want to see my wood pile even small pieces get put to use

John McNamara18/08/2018 03:58:26
avatar
1311 forum posts
113 photos

Just stumbled on this 1928 book

If you google

internet archive philosophy nicholson

Old but a great reference on filing.

Regards
John

thaiguzzi18/08/2018 07:52:59
avatar
646 forum posts
131 photos

Re YouTube, most people are familiar with Stefan the German's channel. I just, via him, came across RobRenz.. This man is very very good. Interesting, technically clever, good camera work, great channel.

If you like humour thrown in, check out This Old Tony.

Boiler Bri18/08/2018 08:24:26
avatar
817 forum posts
287 photos

I have most of the ones mentioned and the workshop series. As a reference i have to say that i will have used techniques from most of them over the years.

All good recomendations. Join a club as well if there is one local to you.

Bri

Michael Gilligan18/08/2018 09:07:39
avatar
14944 forum posts
638 photos
Posted by John McNamara on 18/08/2018 03:58:26:

Just stumbled on this 1928 book

internet archive philosophy nicholson

Old but a great reference on filing.

.

Thanks, John

That's a welcome addition to my digital library yes **LINK**

https://archive.org/details/NicholsonFilePhilosophy1928

MichaelG.

.

Note: the book title is wittier than the document name

... Oh, the joy of ambiguity !!

Mick Henshall18/08/2018 09:43:32
527 forum posts
29 photos

Ther are lots of good stuff on YT but my favourite is " Old Time Steam Workshop " by David Richards, an example of a 1925 machine shop powered by steam and lineshafts, proper old school and a joy to watch go on fellas treat yourselves

Mick

Mick Henshall18/08/2018 09:43:33
527 forum posts
29 photos

Deleted

Mick

 

 

Edited By Mick Henshall on 18/08/2018 09:45:59

Mick Henshall18/08/2018 09:43:34
527 forum posts
29 photos

And deleted again-- groan!

Mick

 

 

Edited By Mick Henshall on 18/08/2018 09:47:31

Mick Henshall18/08/2018 09:44:38
527 forum posts
29 photos

Sorry for double tap must be the alcohol

Mick

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
ChesterUK
Eccentric July 5 2018
Warco
Ausee.com.au
cowells
Allendale Electronics
emcomachinetools
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest