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Threaded rod into brass tube

For making a wire Clamptite tool

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Michael O'Callaghan07/08/2018 15:43:29
4 forum posts

Hi

I've put up a chain link fence in my back garden to stop cats from using my garden as a toilet. But at present the ends of the fence are just tacked to stakes as a temporary measure until I come up with a more permanent fix.

There's a company (Clamptite)in the US that sell's tools that wrap wire around a post so tightly no cats wouldn't be able to get past it and just find another route to where ever they want to go.

The problem here is that with post and packaging it comes to over £50. So I want to make one myself. The brass tube is M18 and I need a threaded rod with a threaded Rod Connecting Nut to fit snugly inside it to be able to wind it round in a clockwise direction inside via a locking nut on the end. There will be slots in the tubes sides (Hopefully do that on my cnc router, I'll come back with that question in another post) so the short rods either side run up and down the tube holding the wire.

I can't find a royalty free picture of the tool but here is a link to a YouTube video about the use of the tool so you can see what I'm talking about.

Thanks a lot

Neil Wyatt08/08/2018 10:52:25
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Moderator
16415 forum posts
685 photos
74 articles

Hello Michael,

I'm still not 100% sure what you want...

You should be able to find a basic fence wire strainer/tensioner for around £20.

Neil

Juddy08/08/2018 10:56:13
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57 forum posts

Why not just use cable ties? a lot less fussy or here is a closer view of the clamp I think you are referring to:

**LINK**

Martin Connelly08/08/2018 10:59:31
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847 forum posts
99 photos

You can get slotted steel tube for nylon mesh fencing in garden centres.

Martin C

Hopper08/08/2018 11:02:27
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3651 forum posts
72 photos

The tool in the video looks like overkill for your purpose. It's made for clamping plastic fuel or oil hose on to steel pipe etc. to withstand pressure.

To hold a bit of chainlink to a fencepost there are simpler, cheaper ways. Bit of wire would do the job, pulled tight with pliers. If you want something tighter, ordinary black nylon cable ties, aka zip ties, of a suitably heavy size will do the job. You pull the tail tight with a pair of ordinary pliers and the tie will not shift. My cats could not get out past a fence built like this, so I speak from experience.

Clive Foster08/08/2018 12:53:47
1799 forum posts
59 photos

Agreed that the Clamptite tool is overkill for fencing duties but it looks to be a generally useful device to have around.

Lots of DIY you tubes showing "the one wot i made" but not much in the way of useful dimensions or proper plans. Some dimensions and clear picture around the middle of the thread linked here :- **LINK**. if you fancy a roll your own.

But I suspect there are some pesky, non obvious, details that make the difference between "Well it works if I'm careful." and "Really good, I could sell these!". Might be issues with wire type. I can see these things seriously over tensioning ordinary wire.

Best sort of cable tie is probably the type with a metal tongue and lightly serrated tail. Grip is by tongue biting ito the tail rather than via plastic teeth. The metal tongue variety can go uber tight, especially if you use the proper pulling plier tool to finish off. Allegedly the metal tongue ones are exterior rated and won't deteriorate under sunlight. Some of the ordinary variety will give up after a couple or three years out in the weather. Not what they are made for.

Clive.

richardandtracy08/08/2018 13:35:44
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938 forum posts
10 photos

I found the most effective method from preventing cats getting into & using my garden as a toilet was to get the roughest, toughest, stroppiest Tom in the area. Then neutering him. After being able to rape/fight any cat around, only being able to fight it tends to make the Tom even more stroppy and aggressive. That will keep the other cats out, and a cat never uses its own garden as a toilet if it can help it.

How do I know this is effective? Experience, only experience.. **LINK**

Regards,

Richard.

Marischal Ellis08/08/2018 14:06:17
18 forum posts
11 photos

Not strictly metalwork.........but, I believe a cheap and easy way to exclude cats is to male pee along the perimeter wall or whatever. I am not sure that your female neighbours would be agreeable to this but you could do it under the cover of darkness or use a jug...a hand made metal one of course.

Best wishes to all.

Michael O'Callaghan08/08/2018 15:50:53
4 forum posts

Firstly, I'd like to thank you all for your replies, they were excellent. Now I wasn't completely honest with you as I already own a Clamptite tool which I bought a couple of months ago. When it came I was so unimpressed I nearly sent it back. It was tiny and definitely not up to the task of securing a wire fence to a stake. So I wanted to see if I could make one myself. This is why I wanted to know what size threaded rod would fit snugly inside a M18 pipe or tube and what size would it be with a threaded rod connecting nut.

It was interesting to here your advice as to how to prevent cats using my garden as a loo, but I already over came that problem by putting up an electric fence. See photo's. It was also interesting to see 'Albert' (Deceased) the demon cat from where ever Richard hails from (not from around Lincoln thank God) We have enough cats competing for the title

Electric fence:3ft Wire fence held in place temporarily  by staples .

clogs08/08/2018 18:08:36
476 forum posts
12 photos

I have literally miles of sheep fencing......

I just use fencing pliers, the sort with a serated hamer........does everything I need looks neat and dead tight to the post....

watched the video.......NICE if u got the time to waste.......hahaha......

John Paton 108/08/2018 19:25:02
170 forum posts
6 photos

You might just be wasting time - the cats round here jump a 7ft high wooden fence with ease and happily walk along the top of it. You might try two wires along the top hooked to a domestic type electric fence unit. Other than that the other remedies are probably more effective.

We always find it distressing that, having made a wildlife friendly garden, village cats come in and hoover up the fledgeling birds once they leave the nest - wrens, robins, sparrows, blackbirds and thrushes rarely survive their first two weeks out of the nest.

John Paton 108/08/2018 19:25:05
170 forum posts
6 photos

You might just be wasting time - the cats round here jump a 7ft high wooden fence with ease and happily walk along the top of it. You might try two wires along the top hooked to a domestic type electric fence unit. Other than that the other remedies are probably more effective.

We always find it distressing that, having made a wildlife friendly garden, village cats come in and hoover up the fledgeling birds once they leave the nest - wrens, robins, sparrows, blackbirds and thrushes rarely survive their first two weeks out of the nest.

Michael O'Callaghan08/08/2018 22:25:47
4 forum posts

Doesn't seem much point in coming here asking about tubes and threaded rods if everybody is more concerned about the local cat population.

Perhaps it would be better to change the name of this forum from beginners to cats.

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