By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Oct 22nd

Teaching a 17 year old how to use a lathe

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
ANDY CAWLEY30/06/2018 08:45:43
144 forum posts
42 photos

My 17 year old nephew has inherited, from a distant relative, a fully equipped Myford Super 7 complete with screw cutting gearbox, vertical slide etc.

He said " Uncle Andy will you show me how to use it?"

Where do I start and and carry on.

I did not serve time on the tools when I did my engineering at college and am a self taught (with book learning behind me) machinist. Amateur I hasten to add.

 

 

 

Edited By ANDY CAWLEY on 30/06/2018 08:47:07

Cabinet Enforcer30/06/2018 09:03:40
46 forum posts
2 photos

Write up the really basic safety rules, and stick them on the wall behind the lathe.

Discuss what he might want to make, then guide him through it step by step. Making something he wants will help maintain interest and help with information retention as it helps relate processes to a real object.

Get him to research the processes himself on youtube, you want to teach him enough so he can teach himself, there's no point in having you do all the work in the learning process.

Edited By Cabinet Enforcer on 30/06/2018 09:03:53

Michael Gilligan30/06/2018 09:22:59
avatar
14011 forum posts
608 photos

Aside from the obvious merits of a practical project ... Download this: **LINK**

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/5795.pdf

'How to run a Lathe' by SouthBend ... it's a gem.

MichaelG.

larry phelan 130/06/2018 09:27:44
502 forum posts
11 photos

Lucky Boy !!

Mick B130/06/2018 09:41:50
1187 forum posts
66 photos

Engineering is 95% applied common sense, which is why there are so many self-taught engineers.

Get him working on one of the basic Stuart singles, and that'll exercise many of the standard lathe operations.

john fletcher 130/06/2018 10:05:21
528 forum posts

Regarding safety, if you have access to a Harrison 245 manual get the young man to read the pages on Operating Safely in my opinion they are very sensible, not over the top. Also EITB used to issue some excellent training manuals. Maybe some one HERE may like to donate and has MichaelG.has said the South Bend book is good, I think is obtainable from Camden Books. John

SillyOldDuffer30/06/2018 10:23:13
4711 forum posts
1010 photos
Posted by Mick B1 on 30/06/2018 09:41:50:

Engineering is 95% applied common sense, which is why there are so many self-taught engineers.

Get him working on one of the basic Stuart singles, and that'll exercise many of the standard lathe operations.

Unfortunately Mick, there is no such thing as common sense! (The link also contains good advice about teaching and encouraging.)

I agree about starting with a simple engine that runs and can be shown off. The challenge with a 17 year old is catching and keeping his interest. Far more going on in his life than ours. I'd recommend Stewart Hart's Potty Mill. Not too expensive, no castings, and a good beginner challenge - neither difficult or too easy. Ideally make two; you make a part while he watches, then he makes it with you advising. Don't abandon the poor lad with an Engine Plan, list of safety instructions, pile of metal, lathe and a box of tools he doesn't recognise.

Dave

Gordon W30/06/2018 10:53:29
2011 forum posts

You have my sympathy. I've tried to teach my grandson. He was about 20 yrs old at the start, so I thought he must have some idea, but no. Safety basics need hammering in at first, but eventually (when he understood the reasons for silly rules) things progressed. He acquired an old bronze gong with no hammer and asked if he could make one. So started out with bits of scrap and ended up with a beater. Now wants to learn more, because he can see why things are done the way they are, but also there are other ways to work. And the basic safety seems to have stuck.

Richard brown 130/06/2018 10:53:54
104 forum posts
31 photos

Regards Safety. If your worried someone might mess about with a a machine show them this sort of thing. Its not nasty in any way but does show well not to mess with machinery.

Rich

**LINK**

Hopper30/06/2018 11:33:02
avatar
3706 forum posts
73 photos

For today's 17yo, YoOutube might be more relevant than books as a learning tool. Youtube videos by Tubal Cain seem to be popular and start off with basics. Plenty of others too.

For a back up reference, LH Sparey's book "The Amateur's Lathe" features the Myford and is my favorite basics book.\

ISTR starting off in high school with simple projects like making a centre punch out of a bit of hex bar, candle holders and other simple pieces before moving on to a simple oscillating "wobbler" steam engine.

Mick B130/06/2018 11:34:26
1187 forum posts
66 photos
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 30/06/2018 10:23:13:
Posted by Mick B1 on 30/06/2018 09:41:50:

Engineering is 95% applied common sense, which is why there are so many self-taught engineers.

Get him working on one of the basic Stuart singles, and that'll exercise many of the standard lathe operations.

Unfortunately Mick, there is no such thing as common sense! (The link also contains good advice about teaching and encouraging.)

I agree about starting with a simple engine that runs and can be shown off. The challenge with a 17 year old is catching and keeping his interest.

...

Dave

Nah, you can see that tract in your link was scribbled by a Manager, and we all know many of them have a problem with it.wink 2.

But if catching and keeping the lads interest is a challenge, the battle's already half-lost.

Of course, the force of his interest isn't especially clear from the OP, but if I'd had such a chance at 17, I'd've bitten the uncle's 'and orf!

Jon Lawes30/06/2018 12:47:21
avatar
324 forum posts

To maintain interest make sure you apply it to things he might be interested in. I've made basic mountain bike parts with my son (bar ends, that sort of thing) which seems to have kept his interest. At 17 a gearknob might be good, something like that. Rather than trying to push the engineering in its own right, show him how it can help him support an interest he already has.

I used to teach in a college and most of the students were keen enough, the two biggest issues were trying to stop them throwing themselves into it at a million miles an hour, and keeping the projects small enough to maintain a lad or ladies interest. A wobbler engine from stock is a great starting point, I suspect a stuart single would be a bit much for first ever project if no metal has ever been cut prior. Maybe it would be a good second project.

Richard brown 130/06/2018 13:13:27
104 forum posts
31 photos
I think you start with something that can be finished quickly and simply. For example me and my 9 year old son mounted an old ryobi strimmer engine over the back wheel of his old bike, it was very quick and simple and was done in less than a day. He did the drilling and turning on the lathe on the very simple bits, obviously with close supervision, and he loves it. I hope he will get an interest in engineering this way and can then make whatever he wants.
--
JohnF30/06/2018 13:56:14
avatar
864 forum posts
102 photos

Andy, have a look in my album's at the Stirling Engine, this was built by my Grandson age 14 -- he's now 20 and most way through his engineering apprenticeship. He had used machine's since around 12 - always start young ! but this was the first proper project and he made everything himself under instruction - a great way to teach and they have something to show at the end.

This covered turning, milling, drilling & tapping, knurling, screw cutting, soldering, filing, sawing, marking out, so an all round project.

Good luck with your apprentice. John

dsc_0567.jpg

Edited By JohnF on 30/06/2018 13:56:34 spellings etc ! darn auto correct !

Edited By JohnF on 30/06/2018 13:58:28

Paul M30/06/2018 14:39:14
26 forum posts

As a retired teacher of technology with 40 yrs experience I have spent hundreds of hours teaching basic lathe work to both boys and girls.

Advice:

Don't lecture but always demonstrate processes first.

Keep a keen eye on safe practice. Mind that sharp lathe tool - the source of many accidents!

After a few basic lessons make something useful that your nephew would be interested in using or give away as a gift to his mother or girl friend. Alternatively, build something together.

Current technology taught in most schools has little or no engineering involved (don't get me started). Inspiring people of your nephew's age is creditable so I hope all goes well.

You will know quickly if he is going to be interested and want to develop his skills.

mechman4830/06/2018 15:55:27
avatar
2458 forum posts
371 photos

As a previous apprentice instructor, male & female... safety, demonstrate the controls of machines, Identify tooling, demonstrate -basic speeds & feeds, correct tooling set up, different cutting finishes of materials et al, all demonstrated by you first. Then let him/her start themselves on the operation, set up etc, with you close by commenting & guiding him along. As with all apprentice pieces get him/her to make a centre punch / plumb bob first; includes taper turning, drilling & hand tapping/ threading with die stocks, checking lengths / diameters with rules / vernier callipers then micrometer. You'll soon see if his/her interest lasts after all that, then maybe you could build an easy starter project with him / her, that way you can keep an eye on him/her whilst they do the simple machining stages.

George.

Andrew Tinsley30/06/2018 16:26:07
919 forum posts

I have a small lathe which I used to teach my 6 year old grandson how to do lathe work. He is now 7 going into 8 and he is quite a good turner. He seems to have a knack of getting DoCs and feed rates just right.

He is always closely supervised, but I hardly ever need to intervene. I seem to remember that Tubal Cain had a similarly aged grand daughter who was perhaps even better than my grandson on her small lathe.

Before I am roundly denigrated for risking my grandson's life and limb. I took a long time explaining the dangers inherent in lathe work. He has a retentive memory and I have hardly ever needed to intervene. I would think a 17 year old would be easier to teach.

Andrew.

not done it yet30/06/2018 16:59:43
3357 forum posts
11 photos

The centre punch is a particularly good example, as the order of operations needs to be carefully thought out and heat treatment can be yet another addition, to demonstrate the extra options for the materials selected.

But safety is paramount, as others point out. One can always make another part, but replacement fingers, hands, eyes and lives are not possible.

richardandtracy30/06/2018 17:22:27
avatar
938 forum posts
10 photos

The fastest way to teach safety with a machine tool is with a pork or lamb chop. Get the youngster to feed it into the spinning machinery and see what happens. Then ask the difference between the chop and fingers. They get the message loud and clear. Did something like it with my daughters and the 10" mitre saw I have in the workshop, but used frankfurters. Actually managed to put them off touching the tool for years.

Regards

Richard.

Mark Gould 130/06/2018 17:36:49
130 forum posts
92 photos

I also enjoy watching a guy on youtube called Tom’s Techniques. He has a no nonsense way of teaching and tends to be quite to the point. It’s easy for a teenager to lose interest quickly!

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Meridienne oct 2019
Eccentric Engineering
cowbells
Eccentric July 5 2018
ChesterUK
TRANSWAVE Converters
Ausee.com.au
Warco
Allendale Electronics
emcomachinetools
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest