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Machinery's Handbook

30th Ed, 2016

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Dunc14/06/2018 13:35:37
127 forum posts

The large print version is available for download on the US's archive.org.

 

 

 

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 15/06/2018 15:38:49

Michael Gilligan14/06/2018 13:45:26
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14025 forum posts
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2,894 pages of searchable PDF

Happy Daze

MichaelG.

richardandtracy14/06/2018 21:31:55
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938 forum posts
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As this is within copyright, I am not convinced it's completely legitimate.

Regards

Richard.

Clive Foster15/06/2018 09:13:02
1845 forum posts
59 photos

Almost certainly not legit unless the publishers are using it as a sprat to catch a mackerel. I have 4 hard copy editions of Machinery's Handbook and PDF versions of two. The information changes sufficiently that its worth having editions with publication date intervals of 20 years or so. PDF on screen versions are a right royal pain to use in practice, not that the paper ones are exactly easy due to their sheer size. A lot of the time with the PDF ones you end up printing pages or making semi legible notes to cart data over to where you are working.

As for flicking out of the CAD program, into the PDF and back without loosing track of what you are doing or forgetting what you just looked up. Puts the danger UXB nuke (large) temper meter needle top of the red on the third lap. Often the only sensible way to use screen data is to have a dedicated laptop, or maybe tablet. My old, pre-intel 17" Mac laptop is great at this but its huge so finding space for it is an issue.

Really its long past time that publishers came to terms with the internet and made downloading simple, cheap and accessible for all. If all the tracking stuff we hear about is correct it can't be hard to track every time a copyrighted file is downloaded and pass a suitable, small, payment to the copyright owner. Ideal would be a seamless bolt on to your internet package as in X GB of copyright data per month at book, music or film rate. None of this subscriptions, joining up or other nonsense to worry about. Be nice to include web sites as well so all those folk who put lots of work into showing us interesting things get a few shekels for their efforts. Lot of stuff I see makes me feel a little bit guilty about getting it for free.

Clive.

Edited By Clive Foster on 15/06/2018 09:13:39

Mike Poole15/06/2018 09:21:31
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2117 forum posts
51 photos

I think you need another monitor Clive and use one screen for CAD and the other for data.

Mike

martin perman15/06/2018 13:07:47
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1657 forum posts
67 photos

When I finished my apprenticeship my mother and father bought me the 19th Edition and I've had no reason to up date it, that and my copies of another earlier engineering book kept my brain throbbing.

Martin P

Nige15/06/2018 15:25:15
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I have sent an email to info@archive.org asking about the copyright status of this and will post any replies here

Neil Wyatt15/06/2018 15:43:09
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Archive.org allows anyone to upload publications and then requires publishers to provide quite a substantial amount of information before they will remove a publication.

Some time ago I had to spend a couple of hours filling in forms and tracking down links to get multiple copies of several MyTimeMedia magazines removed.

I've removed the links.

Neil

Neil Wyatt15/06/2018 15:49:16
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Posted by Clive Foster on 15/06/2018 09:13:02:

Really its long past time that publishers came to terms with the internet and made downloading simple, cheap and accessible for all. If all the tracking stuff we hear about is correct it can't be hard to track every time a copyrighted file is downloaded and pass a suitable, small, payment to the copyright owner. Ideal would be a seamless bolt on to your internet package as in X GB of copyright data per month at book, music or film rate. None of this subscriptions, joining up or other nonsense to worry about. Be nice to include web sites as well so all those folk who put lots of work into showing us interesting things get a few shekels for their efforts. Lot of stuff I see makes me feel a little bit guilty about getting it for free.

Look what the likes of Apple Music and Spotify have done to recorded music.

Artists now make relatively little from album sales, with most income now coming from touring. Great for live music, but heartbreaking for small bands who can't make a reasonable living from their recordings.

Neil

SillyOldDuffer15/06/2018 17:04:05
4723 forum posts
1010 photos
Posted by Clive Foster on 15/06/2018 09:13:02:

 

 

...

If all the tracking stuff we hear about is correct it can't be hard to track every time a copyrighted file is downloaded and pass a suitable, small, payment to the copyright owner. Ideal would be a seamless bolt on to your internet package as in X GB of copyright data per month at book, music or film rate. None of this subscriptions, joining up or other nonsense to worry about.

...

True it's not hard to track downloads but implementing the second part of the suggestion is pretty tricky, specially if you care who gets their paws on the money. If it was straightforward in a way that eliminated fraud, it would already be available. Sadly, the 'None of this subscriptions, joining up or other nonsense to worry about.' approach is liable to be ruthlessly exploited by the bad guys.

One day perhaps there will be a safe mechanism. As it stands I'm very happy to provide an application you chaps can use to download stuff. All you have to do is type in your bank details and it will seamlessly transfer money from your account to mine. All of it...

wink

Honest Dave (Trust me, I'm an engineer.)

c/o Mme Epineux Filouter
Box 999
Banque Manque de Confiance
666 Blanchiment D'argent Boulevarde
Ponzi
République Centrafricaine

 

Edited By SillyOldDuffer on 15/06/2018 17:08:07

SillyOldDuffer15/06/2018 17:09:04
4723 forum posts
1010 photos
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 15/06/2018 17:04:05:
Posted by Clive Foster on 15/06/2018 09:13:02:

...

If all the tracking stuff we hear about is correct it can't be hard to track every time a copyrighted file is downloaded and pass a suitable, small, payment to the copyright owner. Ideal would be a seamless bolt on to your internet package as in X GB of copyright data per month at book, music or film rate. None of this subscriptions, joining up or other nonsense to worry about.

...

True it's not hard to track downloads but implementing the second part of the suggestion is pretty tricky, specially if you care who gets their paws on the money. If it was straightforward in a way that eliminated fraud, it would already be available. Sadly, the 'None of this subscriptions, joining up or other nonsense to worry about.' approach is liable to be ruthlessly exploited by the bad guys.

One day perhaps there will be a safe mechanism. As it stands I'm very happy to provide an application you chaps can use to download stuff. All you have to do is type in your bank details and it will seamlessly transfer money from your account to mine. All of it...

wink

Honest Dave Enterprises (Trust me, I'm an engineer.)

c/o Mme Epineux Filouter
Box 999
Banque Manque de Confiance
666 Blanchiment D'argent Boulevarde
Ponzi
République Centrafricaine

Nige15/06/2018 17:25:54
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65 photos

For what it is worth this is the reply to my query to the archive about copyright status of the book in question.

Hello,

Thank you for the inquiry. The Internet Archive generally does not advise as to the copyright status of items in the collection at www.archive.org and does not guarantee the accuracy of information posted on items’ details or collection pages, including information regarding copyright or intellectual property rights of any kind. Our terms of use (terms.php >**LINK**) require that users make use of the Internet Archive's Collections at their own risk and ensure that such use is non-infringing and in accordance with all applicable laws.

Please be aware that a great many of the items on archive.org and accompanying information have been posted by account-holders (both private individuals and individuals acting on behalf of public and private institutions) and not by Internet Archive directly. Internet Archive does not review their submissions for accuracy.

You should, of course, feel free to contact any donor institutions, authors, or publishers using information posted on details or collections pages at **LINK** if you seek to obtain more information from them. Should you wish to pose questions to the uploader, it may be worth your while to post a review to the item (our system will attempt to automatically notify a user whenever a review to one of their items has been posted). The Internet Archive cannot provide contact information other than that which is provided on these pages.


The Internet Archive Team

So a typical 'Teflon shoulders' approach from them; everybody else is responsible for checking that

A) they are permitted to upload material OR

B) they are permitted to download any material.

Neil Wyatt15/06/2018 17:34:10
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The 'three wise monkeys' approach to copyright control...

richardandtracy15/06/2018 17:44:49
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There are some interesting books there. But I wouldn't recommend downloading the 'Scientific Principles of Improvised Warfare and self defence' series, with its books on chemical and bacteriological warfare in addition to explosive manufacture, in the UK. Hardly likely to be treated differently from the banned 'Anarchists Cookbook' in legal terms.

I think it's a great resource, but tend to go for workshop books published 1920 or earlier. There will then be no copyright issues and they are also relate simpler technology, that doesn't seem out of place in my workshop.

Regards

Richard.

Michael Gilligan15/06/2018 18:02:56
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14025 forum posts
609 photos
Posted by Clive Foster on 15/06/2018 09:13:02:

Really its long past time that publishers came to terms with the internet and made downloading simple, cheap and accessible for all. If all the tracking stuff we hear about is correct it can't be hard to track every time a copyrighted file is downloaded and pass a suitable, small, payment to the copyright owner.

.

Here's a reality check: **LINK**

https://ebooks.industrialpress.com/

'Industrial Press' is the publisher of the book in question, and they charge $105 for an eBook download.

That is, of course, their prerogative; and given the content it surely cannot be considered unreasonable !!

A different pricing model might result in less piracy, but which of us has the skill to detemine what a "suitable, small, payment" would be ?

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan15/06/2018 19:14:21
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14025 forum posts
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Just as an aside ...

I was rather surprised to see this statement, regarding the 'LargePrint' :

[quote] Please Note: This edition is called “Large Print” as it is an enlarged (7" X 10" version of the original, smaller (4.6" x 7" toolbox sized edition of this title. The text in this edition is the size of standard reference materials and is not enlarged print for individuals with partial sight. [/quote]

dont know MichaelG.

.

1. Sorry about the auto-smileys ... I think we all recognise the problem.

2. Here's the page : https://new.industrialpress.com/machinery-s-handbook-30th-edition-large-print.html

 

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 15/06/2018 19:18:02

John McNamara16/06/2018 02:00:05
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1309 forum posts
113 photos

Hi All

Just search Google for a second hand copy. I noted several for 20-30 dollars. I have an eleventh and a 25th edition found second hand. easier to use than a PDF version.

Regards
John

Hopper16/06/2018 02:24:13
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3715 forum posts
73 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 15/06/2018 19:14:21:...

...

1. Sorry about the auto-smileys ... I think we all recognise the problem.

...

If you put a space before the closing bracket, it fixes it.

(7" X 10" becomes (7" X 10" )

Easy peasy and much less annoying although still not technically correct with the extra space..

Edited By Hopper on 16/06/2018 02:24:32

Edited By Hopper on 16/06/2018 02:25:22

Michael Gilligan16/06/2018 04:21:50
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14025 forum posts
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^^^ Yes, I know, Hopper

That's why I wrote: "I think we all recognise the problem" instead of bothering to fudge it.

MichaelG.

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