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What's the best alternative to 'loctited'

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Neil Wyatt22/05/2018 11:43:34
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Many of MEW's contributors state that they have 'loctited' something in place (various spellings and capitalisations used!)

This doesn't really seem right.

The alternative 'glued' is certainly correct but generates a rather 'Blue Peter' image...

The alternative 'secured in place' demands that you state what it was secured in place with was it an anaerobic adhesive, cyanoacrylate adhesive or some other retainer? All rather clumsy and prone to inaccuracy as writers often don't specify what sort of compound was used.

Can anyone suggest a one-word alternative which isn't based on a trade name and doesn't have the vagueness of 'glued'?

Jon Gibbs22/05/2018 11:52:19
738 forum posts

It is still a bit vague but "bonded" would be an alternative.

mechman4822/05/2018 11:54:35
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... Retained...?

Geo.

Peter G. Shaw22/05/2018 11:59:59
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Might I suggest that the correct terminology would be something similar to "secured by an adhesive such as... ". Or possibly " secured by a(n) (description of adhesive type) adhesive such as ...".

Example: "I fixed the wheel to the axle using a cyanoacrylate adhesive such as Loctite 999 (TM)".

Example: "I used Araldite Steel epoxy adhesive to fasten the top tube into the socket."

Peter G. Shaw

ps. I have no idea if Loctite 999 exists.

pps. Dictionary definition of "adhesive": noun a substance used to stick things together.

Speedy Builder522/05/2018 12:01:18
1890 forum posts
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So what is the problem? I HOOVER the lounge, use BIROS, in fact use many trade names as a generic. I think that to use any other name would confuse the marketplace.

Martin Kyte22/05/2018 12:04:23
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Well Loctite and loctited probably has aquired the generic status of Hoover and hoovered so I dont really think it's a problem.

Maybe loc-ed

tec-bonded

liquid-welded

chemi-bonded

I probably prefer chem-bonded, chemi-bonded or chemically bonded myself.

regards Martin

Bill Phinn22/05/2018 12:06:16
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"Threadlocked"?, though this may have the same ambiguity as Loctited in suggesting one of a number of substances used, or even no substance at all.

Neil Wyatt22/05/2018 12:19:37
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Posted by Peter G. Shaw on 22/05/2018 11:59:59:

Might I suggest that the correct terminology would be something similar to "secured by an adhesive such as... ". Or possibly " secured by a(n) (description of adhesive type) adhesive such as ...".

Example: "I fixed the wheel to the axle using a cyanoacrylate adhesive such as Loctite 999 (TM)".

Example: "I used Araldite Steel epoxy adhesive to fasten the top tube into the socket."

Peter G. Shaw

ps. I have no idea if Loctite 999 exists.

pps. Dictionary definition of "adhesive": noun a substance used to stick things together.

That's exactly the clumsy language I want to avoid!

'Hoover' may have become a noun but 'loctited' isn't in the dictionary yet and I think it's clumsy.

'Glued' is better than 'retained', 'secured' etc. as they beg the question 'secured/retained with what?' Glued clearly implies the use of an adhesive.

In engineering literature 'bonded' seems to be preferred, perhaps that's the verb to use.

Neil

Brian G22/05/2018 12:24:22
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I am with Peter on this as I would like to know the adhesive used. I cannot be the only one confused by the range on offer.

Perhaps " with as in "holes plugged with Wrigley's Spearmint chewing gum" would be a useful style in the absence of an MEW article (or series) describing the current adhesives and their applications?

Brian

EDIT  An alternative might be to put "bonded" in the text and to detail the adhesives used in a footnote.  After all, there is as much practical difference between shellac and epoxy resin as between soft solder and brazing.

Edited By Brian G on 22/05/2018 12:29:16

blowlamp22/05/2018 12:25:25
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I propose a new word be created based on the portmanteau of Engineering Adhesive.

Let this new word be known as Edhesive. smiley

Ron Laden22/05/2018 12:43:48
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I dont see how one-word helps and if you go with "bonded"... bonded with what...?

I am quite happy for someone to state "loctited"

Mike22/05/2018 12:52:05
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The problem now is that Loctite is not the only range of engineering adhesives performing similar functions. If we have to use a single word, then let it be "bonded", although it tells us little because there are so many bonding agents in use, from comparatively weak shellac to some of the toughest grades of - well - Loctite. If I want to do a job similar to one described on this forum, I want as much information as possible, and a phrase like "Bonded with Loctite 272 or its equivalent" tells the full story. Sorry, Neil, but I do not think one word is ever going to do. Above all, let us not start using nouns as verbs. When I was a newspaper editor, my favourite hate was the made-up verb "to showcase", and in my publication it was banned.

Neil Wyatt22/05/2018 13:02:45
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The problem with 'loctited' is that very often people haven't actually used loctite and if they have which of several dozen products do they mean?

While it's useful if authors could specify what they used, they usually don't...

Bonded is implicitly with an adhesive without giving a misleading idea of what may have been used, I could 'secure' something with a rope or retain something by putting a brick on top of it...

That said I rather like 'glued'...

Neil

P.S. I am as guilty as anyone else.

Clive Foster22/05/2018 13:04:41
1992 forum posts
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Neil

'fraid you are stuck.

When a trade name well known for certain properties becomes a generic term its because there is no suitable single / very few word alternative that adequately covers the circumstances in which it has become the norm.

Although gluing, bonding, secure with engineering adhesive et al are probably more generic and equally adequate loctited specifically covers fixing a shaft it a hole or male and female threads to a suitable degree of permanence. This particular duty and the substances used thereof are both sufficiently widespread and sufficiently specific that a separate term is useful. All other candidates are more general with properties which may conflict with that application if unwisely chosen. It is, for example, possible to bond shafts in holes with glues and engineering adhesives that are not generically loctites but the overall properties and techniques may well be different.

Using loctite, preferably with a suitable grade or strength annotation, covers things nicely with minimal ambiguity. The edit from Brian G above nicely illustrates the problems you can get into when you start trying too pedantic. Shades of the Academie Francaise.

Clive.

PS Re Niels post above.  Loctite(d) specific trade name and loctited process.  If different brand is really important then say so but usually merely high, medium, low strength is sufficient.  Or just assume what is usually used.

Simples

.Edited By Clive Foster on 22/05/2018 13:04:56

Edited By Clive Foster on 22/05/2018 13:08:15

Bazyle22/05/2018 13:08:09
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We derive many words, especially techie ones from Latin and Greek. The word 'glue' already comes from the Latin.

So how about "kollared" from the Greek word for glue 'kolla'. (Beware spellcheckers trying to replace the k with c.)

John Rudd22/05/2018 13:23:22
1367 forum posts
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Colle is the french equivalent for glue.....

'Bonded' gets my vote, but an indication of the bonding agent used would clarify .....and clear up any ambiguity..

Edited By John Rudd on 22/05/2018 13:23:55

JasonB22/05/2018 13:35:21
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I'd go with "retained with Loctite ###" or "retained with Trueloc ###" when talking about retainers and "Locked with Loctite ###" etc when talking about thread lockers.

 

Though "stuck with a blob of *******###" would also dowink 2

Edited By JasonB on 22/05/2018 13:36:41

MW22/05/2018 13:41:26
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2050 forum posts
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It seems rather a tour-de-farce? laugh

Michael

Michael Gilligan22/05/2018 13:51:05
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The common feature of what most 'traditionalists' might refer to as Loctite is that the materials are anærobic adhesives/retainers/thread-lockers [according to strength].

Sadly: Not only do we see other manufacturers' equivalent products casually referred to as Loctite [which is a protected brand-name], but Henkel has diminished that brand by using it for products way outside the original envelope!

The only rational way I can see of handling the problem is to use the word anærobic as and when appropriate; and to use precise product names [from the actual products used] elsewhere.

MichaelG.

richardandtracy22/05/2018 14:27:35
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'anaerobically locked'?

Not quite the pizzaz of 'loctited', but implies the same thing. The alternative is from the DO at work: 'Loctite 243 A/R', with '243' replaced by an appropriate number.

Regards,

Richard.

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