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Compressor - stand on end?

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charadam18/05/2018 19:30:34
160 forum posts
2 photos

I need to increase my compressor storage capacity from 50 to 100 or 150 litres to facilitate plasma cutting.

Space constraints lead me to ask if a "standard" compressor and reservoir can be operated "stood on end".

I would be fitting a condensation drain to the domed end of the reservoir and fabricating a stand of some kind to support the unit.

Any thoughts?

Edited By charadam on 18/05/2018 19:31:52

Edited By charadam on 18/05/2018 19:32:12

Brian Sweeting18/05/2018 19:43:55
294 forum posts
1 photos

The reservoir can be mounted however you wish but the compressor needs to be kept the right way up to ensure correct lubrication.

charadam18/05/2018 20:04:13
160 forum posts
2 photos

Even on an oil-free type?

Muzzer18/05/2018 20:23:18
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2904 forum posts
448 photos

I'd be careful about "fitting" a drain to the end of the reservoir. 150 litres at 10 bar would equate to a lot of stored energy (about 180kJ). Enough for you to make mud...

Murray

vintagengineer18/05/2018 21:30:14
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468 forum posts
6 photos

You can by vertical compressors. Clarks do one.

not done it yet18/05/2018 21:32:11
2241 forum posts
11 photos

My compressor has always had a vertical tank. About 150 litres at a guess - may even be 200. Presumably they are available from a ‘proper’ pneumatic shop.

Most vertical arrangements I have seen have been small capacity compressors fitted atop the receiver.

I would not be turning a compressor on end, without confirmation from the manufacturer - they, too, will possibly get some condensation at some time. Parking them on end may mean any moisture might collect where it will do no good at all to the ‘bottom’ bearing. There may also be end-float problems within the design, if orientated differently.

How about simply fitting another receiver, either in series or parallel with the existing, Hanging from the ceiling is aways a possibility, even if only connected temporarily when required!

Edit to add: Another point worth checking is the duty cycle for your machine.  It may not cope with extended running.

 

Edited By not done it yet on 18/05/2018 21:57:26

Jon18/05/2018 21:48:26
896 forum posts
45 photos

Tanks a tank it dont know whether its standing up or lying down, its purely pressure about 4 times higher than car tyres 145 psi. Used to working with 6000+ psi.
So you could link to supply compressor with just a hose and the outlet from that through traps, filters, regs etc.

Ideally need a cooler for spraying or bead blasting, copper plumbers 15mm works well with drops and taps at bottom.

Hopper18/05/2018 22:08:13
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2969 forum posts
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Posted by Jon on 18/05/2018 21:48:26:

Tanks a tank it dont know whether its standing up or lying down, its purely pressure about 4 times higher than car tyres 145 psi. Used to working with 6000+ psi.

There's been more than one worker killed by exploding truck tires/rims over the years when proper safety cages have not been used during inflation. Nothing to be sneezed at. And yes a tanks a tank, but a drain is a drain and if its not at the bottom of the tank its not doing you any good.

The OP might look at mounting a compresser in the normal horizontal mode, but up toward ceiling level somewhere so it does not take up floor space. Or mount the compresser lower and the tank higher etc.Or a small lean-to shelter outside the workshop up against its wall?

charadam18/05/2018 22:16:06
160 forum posts
2 photos

I had considered an auxiliary reservoir but ruled it out because of the duty cycle of my existing 50l jobby.

Will not be spraying, only plasma cutting and general duties, which the in-line air separator I added a few years ago copes with.

The problem has just gone away. I have been offered a 150l vertical machine locally for the right price.

Thanks to all for your comments.

David George 118/05/2018 22:41:54
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510 forum posts
184 photos

In the past I fitted large diameter pipe work which acts as a reservoir in its own right we had a large screw compressor delivering 10 bar to machinery. I then fitted an auto drain to remove any excess condensation before it went through a dehumidifier filter the pipe size was about 4 inch pipe size and there was no need for a tank or reservoir.

David

David Standing 118/05/2018 22:51:27
1089 forum posts
43 photos
Posted by charadam on 18/05/2018 20:04:13:

Even on an oil-free type?

Oil free means no oil in the air delivery, not no oil in the pump.

Howard Lewis20/05/2018 16:38:34
1464 forum posts

various comments to anyone contemplating similar action.

1) It should not be necessary to say that a compressor with horizontal crankshaft and vertical cylinder, should not be used with the crankshaft vertical. It is unlikely to survive for long as the upper bearing, big, and piston are going to be starved of oil, and will seize.

2) If the reservoir is reoriented, there should be a drain at the lower end. It should be ensured that the drain connection does not protrude above the level of the tank. Otherwise, a pool of condensation will remain, and rusting will ensue.  It is advisable to leave the drain open when the compressor is not in use, (The advice given by my local compressed air specialist).

3) Do everything possible to ensure that the delivery pipe (often placed in the air stream form the motor cooling fan) does not become heated. If it does, any oil carried over may carbonise and restrict the pipe. This will then become a vicious circle.

I have seen pipes capable of withstanding 600 psi, and supposed to carry air into a 120 psi reservoir, split, because of this!

A friend and working colleague lost the ends from three fingers when this situation led to the reservoir exploding from oil that had been carried over.

You would not take chances with a steam boiler, and the reservoir for an air compressor is also a pressure vessel, usually subjected to a higher pressure than that used on model steam powered models.

DO NOT TAKE ANY RISKS.

If in doubt, consult a local air compressor specialist. Suppliers, such as Machine Mart, Aldi, LiDL, etc are unlikely to have the expertise necessary for this. Go to a specialist.

Howard

 

Edited By Howard Lewis on 20/05/2018 16:40:46

Nick Hulme20/05/2018 19:21:44
579 forum posts
30 photos
Posted by David Standing 1 on 18/05/2018 22:51:27:
Posted by charadam on 18/05/2018 20:04:13:

Even on an oil-free type?

Oil free means no oil in the air delivery, not no oil in the pump.

Not so, it often means oil free, diaphragm pumps don't have a sump with oil in, all the rotation is dealt with by sealed bearings and there is no piston, they're far noisier than conventional compressors and have a far shorter service life

Jon21/05/2018 11:04:02
896 forum posts
45 photos
Posted by Hopper on 18/05/2018 22:08:13:

There's been more than one worker killed by exploding truck tires/rims over the years when proper safety cages have not been used during inflation. Nothing to be sneezed at. And yes a tanks a tank, but a drain is a drain and if its not at the bottom of the tank its not doing you any good.

Quite true but thats nothing to do with the cylinder that should be tested to at least double its max operating ie 290 psi. Tyres another entity, am i right.
As said i design, make stuff 40 times that pressure mostly pressure tested.

Common sense to have drain at the bottom, what use is it any where else.

Howard Lewis22/05/2018 21:14:14
1464 forum posts

Even if the casing looks like a diaphragm compressor, it may not be.

Recently had to try to repair a compressor which looked from its casing, like a diaphragm type. Removing the external clamp revealed a small reciprocating compressor, with a horizontal cylinder, in an oil bath.

My friend powered it up with the upper casing off! It took a time to clean up the oil that went everywhere!

Howard

David Standing 122/05/2018 21:23:56
1089 forum posts
43 photos
Posted by Nick Hulme on 20/05/2018 19:21:44:
Posted by David Standing 1 on 18/05/2018 22:51:27:
Posted by charadam on 18/05/2018 20:04:13:

Even on an oil-free type?

Oil free means no oil in the air delivery, not no oil in the pump.

Not so, it often means oil free, diaphragm pumps don't have a sump with oil in, all the rotation is dealt with by sealed bearings and there is no piston, they're far noisier than conventional compressors and have a far shorter service life

Ah, I didn't know that!

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