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GDPR

General Data Protection Regulation

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Michael Gilligan07/05/2018 15:29:35
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20289 forum posts
1064 photos

Admittedly it's not an exciting subject ... but I'm sharing this because it includes probably the best description I have yet seen of the related processes.

**LINK**

https://www.leica-microsystems.com/company/privacy-policy/

MichaelG.

Harry Wilkes07/05/2018 15:33:45
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1371 forum posts
66 photos

Michael GDPR was hurting my head now it's hurting twice as bad wink

H

John Rudd07/05/2018 15:52:53
1456 forum posts
12 photos

I dont think the 'Data Protection ' act and so called privacy policies do enough to protect us......from the scroats out to fleece us...

As a for instance, Neil had an email about his bank, was asked to click a link.....fortunately he was savvy enough to call his bank directly....but how was his mobile fone number acquired?

I joined BT for their internet service, not long after, despite being ex directory, I bombarded ( might be a bit strong..) with calls from 'BT Technical' telling me there's an issue with my router....again, I called BT, was told its a scam....but how did they get my number?

Its all a bit annoying......

Nick Hulme07/05/2018 17:38:18
750 forum posts
37 photos
Posted by John Rudd on 07/05/2018 15:52:53:As a for instance, Neil had an email about his bank, was asked to click a link.....fortunately he was savvy enough to call his bank directly....but how was his mobile fone number acquired?

Likely a vulnerability in someone else's email who had opened an attachment which hacked them and obtained all the info from their contacts list.

At the end of the day if you click on a link in an email which you have not asked for or discussed, even if you think the sender is legitimate, you are as dumb as a bag of mice.

EDIT-  Or as dumb as a box of rocks :D

Edited By Nick Hulme on 07/05/2018 17:39:51

blowlamp07/05/2018 18:07:54
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1656 forum posts
106 photos

Another way of thinking is needed. MaidSafe Primer.

Page 27 of the document gives a rundown on the issues the network is intended to tackle.

Martin.

Michael Gilligan07/05/2018 20:06:38
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20289 forum posts
1064 photos
Posted by John Rudd on 07/05/2018 15:52:53:

I dont think the 'Data Protection ' act and so called privacy policies do enough to protect us......from the scroats out to fleece us...

[ ... ]

Its all a bit annoying......

.

John,

I'm afraid the GDPR provides 'rules of engagement' for the good guys

... The 'scoats' will, as ever, do what they like.

I'm sure we will see examples of scam eMails that spoof links to some honourable party's GDPR page.

MichaelG.

.

Edit: It's started already sad

https://www.zdnet.com/article/phishing-alert-gdpr-themed-scam-wants-you-to-hand-over-passwords-credit-card-details/

 

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 07/05/2018 20:30:29

Gordon W08/05/2018 09:02:10
2011 forum posts

There are laws against breaking into a house, doesn't stop it happening.

Howard Lewis10/05/2018 11:53:56
6311 forum posts
15 photos

Sadly the Act will, at best, protect us from UK based misuse.

We still need to be vigilant, possibly more so, against the criminals from the rest of the world.

As soon as a protection against one form of attack is found, the space wastes find a way around it.

Just be VERY careful.

Howard

Mike10/05/2018 16:28:28
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713 forum posts
6 photos

Today I had a phone call from 01541-182786 - a recorded voice telling me that my broadband service had been "compromised", and unless I pressed 1 to speak to a technician, the service would be cut off in 24 hours. This is the second time I have received this call, although the first voice was American rather than English. It's clearly some kind of scam, but I can't work out what it is. Anyone else had a similar call? 

Sorry-I've put this in the wrong place - it should have gone in What did you do Today.

Edited By Mike on 10/05/2018 16:29:25

Edited By Mike on 10/05/2018 16:44:11

Samsaranda10/05/2018 17:12:12
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1484 forum posts
7 photos

Hi Mike, if you pressed 1 it would have connected you to someone somewhere but the important thing is you would be charged for the call at an exorbitant cost. The whole purpose of the exercise is to get you to connect to them so they can charge you and then they keep you talking as long as they can, it’s just a scam which makes them a lot of money.

Dave W

Mike10/05/2018 17:25:54
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713 forum posts
6 photos

Thanks, Dave - I guessed it was something like that. After the first call, several weeks ago, my broadband was not cut off. I do wish people would call, rather than use recordings, then I would have the pleasure of giving them the classic advice which is all to do with sex and travel! Nevertheless, I just wonder how many old codgers like me get taken in by these scams.

SillyOldDuffer10/05/2018 17:40:32
Moderator
8899 forum posts
1998 photos
Posted by Mike on 10/05/2018 16:28:28:

Today I had a phone call from 01541-182786 - a recorded voice telling me that my broadband service had been "compromised", and unless I pressed 1 to speak to a technician, the service would be cut off in 24 hours. T...

My mum got one of those yesterday when I was visiting her. Slight variation in that my automated caller claimed to be BT, and offered two options, one of which was 'connect to another provider'. Don't do it! As Dave W says, choosing either option will connect you to something bad whatever it is.

Guess what, typing this post was interrupted by a scam phone call...

Michael Gilligan13/08/2018 20:27:17
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20289 forum posts
1064 photos

I just had to share this:

Having removed hundreds of cookies from my iPad, and failed to remove a few 'persistent' ones, I logged-on to ebay which popped-up its GDPR page. ... I decided not to just accept their cookies, but to check what they were using.

**LINK** surprise https://www.ebay.co.uk/gdpr

As the Smarties advert used to go: "What a lot we've got"

Some of them can be just switched off, but others require a visit to the advertiser's site, to opt-out.

One journey leads to this little gem

img_2120.jpg

.

Now please read, inwardly digest, and tell me ... Has the world has gone mad, or is it just full of rogues & scoundrels who are more adept than the legislators ?

MichaelG.

Alan Vos13/08/2018 20:50:22
162 forum posts
7 photos
Posted by Samsaranda on 10/05/2018 17:12:12:

Hi Mike, if you pressed 1 it would have connected you to someone somewhere but the important thing is you would be charged for the call at an exorbitant cost. The whole purpose of the exercise is to get you to connect to them so they can charge you and then they keep you talking as long as they can, it’s just a scam which makes them a lot of money.

Dave W

As best I can tell this is long-running misinformation/hoax. There is no mechanism for the recpipent of a call to be transferred to them being charged at premium rate. Caller pays. There is a fraud there, but not this.

See here: **LINK**

roy entwistle13/08/2018 21:09:03
1551 forum posts

I've just had an mail purporting to be from HM Revenue telling me to claim a tax rebate. Having never disclosed my email address to H M R I deleted it. If I've lost a tax rebate, hard luck. But I doubt it

Roy

Farmboy13/08/2018 22:58:30
170 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by roy entwistle on 13/08/2018 21:09:03:

I've just had an mail purporting to be from HM Revenue telling me to claim a tax rebate. Having never disclosed my email address to H M R I deleted it. If I've lost a tax rebate, hard luck. But I doubt it

Roy

I think you're safe, I had one too. One advantage of a proper computer over a tablet or 'phone is that when you hover the mouse pointer over the link in the email it shows the actual URL in the bottom left of the browser window. Needless to say, it was not HMRC . . .

As far as GDPR is concerned, nothing seems to have really changed. In most cases, either you agree to their terms or you don't use their web site. The only difference is that they have to make you aware of it.

Mike.

Fowlers Fury14/08/2018 00:40:36
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416 forum posts
92 photos

""As far as GDPR is concerned, nothing seems to have really changed. In most cases, either you agree to their terms or you don't use their web site.

Now it seems 90% of the few websites I check regularly (thankfully not this one yet) don't allow you in unless you give 'em blanket agreement to shower you with cookies & pass on your details to 3rd parties "for marketting purposes". So yes you're right.
I'm aware Firefox has the 'delete history' button and Edge is supposedly sandboxed but I've long used the excellent & free "Sandboxie" for all browsing as well as isolating emails & progs. When finished, a couple of clicks empties the sandbox and none of the crapware gets past it. Easy enough now to OK on a website's "You must agree that we can dump what we like on your computer" and then clear the sandbox.
**LINK**

Tony Pratt 114/08/2018 07:30:08
2027 forum posts
12 photos

Had a couple of calls from foreigners [far eastern sounding, but apparently phoning from London?] saying there was a problem with my BT connection & I needed to let them have control of my PC, this was a surprise as I use Virgin! I wasted a few minutes of their time but got bored eventually.

Tony

Howi14/08/2018 09:13:26
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373 forum posts
19 photos
Posted by Mike on 10/05/2018 16:28:28:

Today I had a phone call from 01541-182786 - a recorded voice telling me that my broadband service had been "compromised", and unless I pressed 1 to speak to a technician, the service would be cut off in 24 hours. This is the second time I have received this call, although the first voice was American rather than English. It's clearly some kind of scam, but I can't work out what it is. Anyone else had a similar call?

Sorry-I've put this in the wrong place - it should have gone in What did you do Today.

Edited By Mike on 10/05/2018 16:29:25

Edited By Mike on 10/05/2018 16:44:11

this scam is to get you to let them into your computer remotely, to FIX the problem. they say will cut you off to frighten you.

once into your computer they will purport to show you PROBLEMS which they can fix for a price, they need your credit card number, if you do not comply at this stage, they will start deleting stuff from your computer until you comply.

they cannot cut your internet off, you would have a complaint against them for non supply of services!!!

there are millions of broadband connections, do you really think they monitor them all?

all it needs is a little bit of common sense, but i have known seemingly inteligent people who have fallen for this scam and have had attempts to raid their bank accounts or delete thousands of files because they would noit give credit card number (they finally realised and switched off the computer).

treat ANY unsolicited call as a scam unless it can be verified.

use your common sense and THINK

do not believe ANY unsolicited call.

Howard Lewis14/08/2018 16:21:59
6311 forum posts
15 photos

As always, the knee jerk reaction legislation will hamstring the law abiding while the villains continue to ignore rules, and laws.

It comes in various forms. The oriental young lady promising to obtain a refund of my bank charges from Barclays, a bank that I don't use. "Natwest?", "You're a scammer! Depart hence" Or words to that effect.

"Your broadband connection will be terminated within 24 hours if you do not click on the link, to reinstate it"

Called my ISP, "Another scam! Ignore it"

Have lost count of the number of folk who tell me that my computer has a fault that they can fix remotely.

The number of UK based cold calls has reduced, but they still dress up their number to look like a UK one, such as 0204******, which is a good clue.

If they ask for you by name, you can always say "Hold the line please while I fetch him (or her)", put the phone down and tiptoe away. Eventually, they get bored, and terminate the call.

1) You are increasing the cost of their call. 2) You are keeping them off someone else's back.

They drop the phone when you tell them that you have their number and will report them for breaking the law.

The only downside is that you cannot receive any genuine incoming calls for that time.

Unlike me, my wife feels sorry for the poor sod who is trying make a living. She overlooks their dishonesty!

Howard

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