By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Forum House Ad Zone

Polishing mops

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Daniel28/04/2018 07:21:49
avatar
338 forum posts
48 photos

Hello All,

Browsing through RDG's site, I see that they offer polishing/buffing mops in either white or yellow.

The product description makes no difference between the two.

Does anyone know if there is a difference ?

TIA

All the best,

Daniel

Michael Gilligan28/04/2018 08:32:37
avatar
20090 forum posts
1041 photos

My guess is that it's just a colour-coding thing ... so that you can have two mops for use with different grades of abrasive.

But I'm sure someone will be along to put me right.

MichaelG.

Daniel28/04/2018 09:08:35
avatar
338 forum posts
48 photos

Hello Michael,

I was wondering that.

But, I would be sure to quickly forget which was which. laugh dont know

Dave Martin28/04/2018 09:18:44
101 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Daniel on 28/04/2018 07:21:49:

Hello All,

Browsing through RDG's site, I see that they offer polishing/buffing mops in either white or yellow.

The product description makes no difference between the two.

Does anyone know if there is a difference ?...

Daniel, although the underlying material and dimensions are the same, there is a subtle distinction in the description in the advertisement. They describe the yellow ones as "Impregnated and especially stiff. For preliminary...." and the white ones as " soft ....For high shine polishing ....Adapts to the workpiece contour. "

Re Michael's comment about using colour-coding to distinguish between grades of polishing compound, you would almost certainly use different grades with the these two wheels. I actually use more grades, and more wheel types including sisal to start sometimes, so I use a 'sharpie' to mark each wheel as to what compound I use it with.

I have no connection with any vendor, I personally buy mine from the range sold by Caswell UK, they also have a useful guide to buffing and polishing, including wheels and compounds.

Edited By Dave Martin on 28/04/2018 09:28:06

AJW28/04/2018 10:06:07
avatar
377 forum posts
137 photos
I think you will find 'hard' mops are sewn nearer the edge making for a more solid buffing wheel.

Alan
Vic28/04/2018 10:17:29
3060 forum posts
8 photos

I use these folks.

**LINK**

They provide lots of information about their products, the prices are good and postage is very reasonable.

Speedy Builder528/04/2018 12:26:56
2593 forum posts
208 photos

My mops are dirty grey and black ! I didn't know that they came in different colours.

Bill Phinn28/04/2018 12:42:57
734 forum posts
103 photos

Posted by Vic on 28/04/2018 10:17:29:

I use these folks.

Seconding that. I use the Menzerna range of polishing compounds, which are fairly new and have been widely adopted by the jewellery trade. I've never used a pre-impregnated polishing mop, and I don't know anyone who does.

Another basic principle of good polishing, besides choosing the right mop for the material you're polishing and compound you're using, is never to let a coarser grade of compound contaminate a finer grade. This means that before you switch to a finer compound (on its own dedicated mop, as with all the compounds you're using) you should thoroughly wash both the item being polished and your hands. For the item, I use an ultrasonic bath.

Getting a flawless mirror finish on metal with polishes alone is a lot harder than people imagine, and polishing was once a trade in its own right. Manufacturers often take shortcuts: the mirror finish on much of the immaculately polished silver or white gold jewellery we see for sale has simply been plated, usually with rhodium.

 
Daniel28/04/2018 14:23:07
avatar
338 forum posts
48 photos

Thank's everyone for the speedy & informative replies.

Much appreciated.

The posted links have certainly opened up a, hitherto, unkown

world to me. laugh

Many thank's, once again.

Daniel

Michael Gilligan28/04/2018 14:48:24
avatar
20090 forum posts
1041 photos

Posted by Dave Martin on 28/04/2018 09:18:44:

I have no connection with any vendor, I personally buy mine from the range sold by Caswell UK, they also have a useful guide to buffing and polishing, including wheels and compounds

.

Thanks for that link to Caswell's guide, Dave

MichaelG.

the artfull-codger28/04/2018 18:17:17
avatar
294 forum posts
28 photos

Quite a dangerous business polishing, I never ever wear gloves when polishing,I prefer black fingers to missing fingers.

Gary Wooding28/04/2018 22:16:19
968 forum posts
253 photos
Posted by Bill Phinn on 28/04/2018 12:42:57:

Posted by Vic on 28/04/2018 10:17:29:

the mirror finish on much of the immaculately polished silver or white gold jewellery we see for sale has simply been plated, usually with rhodium.
 

Not so. As far as I'm aware, silver is never rhodium plated, and white gold is plated only to enhance its colour. When compared to truly white metals such as silver or platinum, white gold has a distinct yellowish or greyish tinge. Rhodium, whilst not as white as silver, is a member of the platinum group and is certainly whiter than white gold, as is obvious when the thin plating wears away to reveal the true white gold below. People get quite upset when they believe their white gold ring is going bad and changing colour, and are usually willing to spend the £50 or so to have it re-plated.

Bill Phinn29/04/2018 01:14:22
734 forum posts
103 photos
Posted by Gary Wooding on 28/04/2018 22:16:19

Not so. As far as I'm aware, silver is never rhodium plated.

Sorry, but it is, and frequently:

http://www.hsamuel.co.uk/webstore/l/jewellery/material%7Crhodium+plated+silver/

Jon29/04/2018 21:16:05
1001 forum posts
49 photos
Posted by the artfull-codger on 28/04/2018 18:17:17:

Quite a dangerous business polishing, I never ever wear gloves when polishing,I prefer black fingers to missing fingers.

Same here you want the feel to be able to react to it. Done my time mop polishing hate it. Still got a 3hp 10" pedestal outside last 8 years that spins oppsite direction and 5500rpm - just hang on to the job, worst case just skates off unless clip bottom edge.
Need a powerful motor if using 60grit, sparks fly.

Hard mops are stitched almost to the outer circumference.

Daniel30/04/2018 07:22:37
avatar
338 forum posts
48 photos

Thank's again for the input everyone.

Ended up with the Polishing Shop, as Caswell's were out of

stock on the items I chose.

It's only low level, mutli purpose shop polishing, that I'm after.

+1 for not wearing gloves. Much safer without.

Have a good day,

Daniel

Tim Stevens30/04/2018 22:00:25
avatar
1587 forum posts

Its a good idea to hang a heavy long curtain or similar a metre or more behind the polishing wheel. Then if you do have the work grabbed it has a good chance of not ricocheting around the shop, and could even fall quietly to the floor undamaged.

Tim

Vic30/04/2018 22:49:43
3060 forum posts
8 photos

Posted by Daniel on 30/04/2018 07:22:37:

+1 for not wearing gloves. Much safer without.

Have a good day,

Daniel

It’s a good idea to wear eye protection and a face mask though.

As a point of interest I’ve been misquoted above. I never mentioned anything about silver! I just happened to mention the Polishingshop.co.uk was a good supplier that I’ve used in the past.

Daniel01/05/2018 06:09:32
avatar
338 forum posts
48 photos
Posted by Vic on 30/04/2018 22:49:43:

As a point of interest I’ve been misquoted above. I never mentioned anything about silver! I just happened to mention the Polishingshop.co.uk was a good supplier that I’ve used in the past.

laughlaughlaugh

Hopper01/05/2018 09:36:03
avatar
6200 forum posts
321 photos

I've always used smaller mops mounted in the pistol drill or more recently on my 4" angle grinder. Job is firmly held in the vice (outside the workshop). I've found this is all that's needed for motorcycle sized jobs, up to full engine casing sidecovers etc. Roughing of badly corroded ally is done with wet-rub paper by hand before final polishing with the mops.

thaiguzzi18/05/2018 10:25:45
avatar
704 forum posts
131 photos
Posted by the artfull-codger on 28/04/2018 18:17:17:

Quite a dangerous business polishing, I never ever wear gloves when polishing,I prefer black fingers to missing fingers.

Really?

I doubt you've ever polished commercially then. ie 10" mops with a 3 phase 3 HP spindle.

Without wearing welding gauntlets you aint gonna be able to hold the component for more than a few SECONDS at a time....

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Eccentric Engineering
Dreweatts
cowells
Eccentric July 5 2018
Rapid RC
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest