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What size Lathe to use to make a 1,2 traction engine

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Henry Ruiter24/04/2018 04:17:53
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What size of a lathe would in need to make a 1",2" traction engine.

Thanks Henry
Thor24/04/2018 07:06:00
949 forum posts
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Hi Henry,

According to Blackgates their 1" scale Minnie can be machined on a 3 ½ " lathe (i.e. a Myford 7).

Thor

JasonB24/04/2018 07:08:53
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A lot will depend on the rear wheel construction, some you can use the casting as supplied, some need the casting machined others use a built up rim that does not need to go on the lathe. If you don't need to machine the rims then the final drive gear is the largest part that needs to be turned.

1" You would need minimum of 5" swing or 6" if the wheels need machining.

2" Minimum 9" swing or 12" if wheels need machining

Edited By JasonB on 24/04/2018 07:09:34

Henry Ruiter24/04/2018 07:12:44
67 forum posts
2 photos
What is that in MMs or CMs.

Thanks Henry
Thor24/04/2018 07:18:19
949 forum posts
22 photos

5" = 127mm

6" = 152.4mm

9" = 228.6mm

12" = 304.8mm

Henry Ruiter24/04/2018 07:19:58
67 forum posts
2 photos
Thank you Thor.

Thanks Henry
Henry Ruiter24/04/2018 07:21:32
67 forum posts
2 photos
What about brands

Thanks Henry
Bazyle24/04/2018 09:17:43
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4023 forum posts
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When you only have 2 things to machine that need a large diameter there are other potential options. You might find a club or evening class with a larger machine, and if you have a milling machine there are more possibilities. Although it seems nice to have a big lathe it ups the cost of all the add-ons quite a lot.

Just get a Boxford AUD if you want a used one or check the threads on here about new far eastern machines.

David Standing 124/04/2018 09:37:09
1042 forum posts
41 photos
Posted by Henry Ruiter on 24/04/2018 07:12:44:
What is that in MMs or CMs.

Thanks Henry

I'd suggest you brush up on how to convert one to the other and vice versa before you start building your TE wink 2

Henry Ruiter24/04/2018 09:40:11
67 forum posts
2 photos
What do you mean I know the difference between CMs and MMs.

Thanks Henry
Henry Ruiter24/04/2018 09:42:47
67 forum posts
2 photos
They don't teach inches and feet in NZ.

Thanks Henry
JasonB24/04/2018 10:11:35
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Almost all designs are in imperial, if you can't convert that yourself then try LSM as they have a couple of theirs in metric but don't do small models so you would be looking at a machine that can swing 300mm dia and have a gap that can take 400mm. Also at that size you will need a milling machine..

David Standing 124/04/2018 10:18:30
1042 forum posts
41 photos
Posted by Henry Ruiter on 24/04/2018 09:40:11:
What do you mean I know the difference between CMs and MMs.

Thanks Henry

I meant the difference between imperial and metric.

As Jason says, much model engineering stuff out there is still dimensioned in imperial - apologies from the mother country! blush

Henry Ruiter24/04/2018 11:37:49
67 forum posts
2 photos
Sorry it's just you weren't clear on that but I could all ways learn it.

Thanks Henry
Andrew Johnston24/04/2018 21:47:40
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3946 forum posts
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This issue is being approached from the wrong direction. For any given scale the size of the engine will vary considerably depending upon it's type. For instance a ploughing engine will be far bigger than a small road engine for the same scale.

So first decide which engine to make, and then look at the largest diameters to be turned, which will determine the size of lathe needed. On my engines the flywheel is rather bigger than the final drive gears, and is the biggest part that needs turning, albeit it can be done in the gap.

Andrew

Henry Ruiter25/04/2018 00:43:45
67 forum posts
2 photos
I was looking at the road Locos or the ones that can go on the roads and model I was looking at was the Burrell, Minnie and the Allchin or any model guys could recommen for a beginner.

Thanks Henry
Hopper25/04/2018 00:54:39
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2794 forum posts
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Posted by Andrew Johnston on 24/04/2018 21:47:40:...

...biggest part that needs turning, albeit it can be done in the gap.

This is an important factor not to be overlooked. A 3.5" lathe can swing much bigger than 7" diameter if it has a gap in the bed, as Myfords and Drummonds do. Just make sure the gap is wide enough to accommodate the job in hand. Myfords will swing up to a 10" diameter faceplate so that is a rough guide.

Henry Ruiter25/04/2018 01:04:44
67 forum posts
2 photos
I do have a metal ruler that has in inches and CMs so I guess that help a little bit.

Thanks Henry
Hopper25/04/2018 05:28:26
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2794 forum posts
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Posted by Henry Ruiter on 25/04/2018 01:04:44:
I do have a metal ruler that has in inches and CMs so I guess that help a little bit.

Thanks Henry

If you find doing metric conversion that difficult, have you really looked at the complexity and hundreds, maybe thousands, of hours of work required to build a traction engine? The kind of effort and initiative required is in another league. Perhaps you should look at a simpler project to begin with?

Thor25/04/2018 05:38:12
949 forum posts
22 photos

Hi Henry,

If you struggle with imperial measurements and would prefer to work in the metric system there are drawings of a metric Minnie here.

Thor

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