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Bandsaw blades

Can they be welded?

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ChrisB04/03/2018 15:01:18
394 forum posts
162 photos

So I accidentally broke an almost new blade on my bandsaw, and ordered a couple of new ones. In the meantime until a get the new blades was wondering if it was possible to weld the broken blade?

Is it something that can be done at a home workshop or its out of question?

Journeyman04/03/2018 15:13:16
avatar
604 forum posts
92 photos

Braze or silver solder the ends together. Scarf (taper) the ends on grinder then hold in a simple jig. I seem to remember one recently in MEW.

John

RichardN04/03/2018 15:15:13
108 forum posts
9 photos

I’ve welded bandsaw blades fairly frequently (possibly frequently due to my technique...)

Clamp both ends of blade (just touching) on a piece of mdf. Bang a splodge of Mig weld on the join. Grind flush.

*(Checking you haven’t left a twist in the blade before welding is optional).

**(when grinding sides of blade flush, it is very easy to break the newly made join- try using sanding drum on dremel rather than angle grinder unless you have more skill than me).

ChrisB04/03/2018 15:15:47
394 forum posts
162 photos

Hmm, no access to torch welding... is a tig welder any good?

Journeyman04/03/2018 15:23:06
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604 forum posts
92 photos

You can braze with TIG low current and suitable rod apparently, no personal knowledge though! Found a Utube Video it's a bit USA but gives the basics.

John

Edit: Add Link

Edited By Journeyman on 04/03/2018 15:27:31

RichardN04/03/2018 15:23:16
108 forum posts
9 photos

I would guess Tig would be fine - I only tried mig when a blade snapped shortly followed by my spare, welded both and have carried on welding all my blades up whenever a blade fails now.

I’m sure scarf jointing and brazing would produce a better joint- but would potentially shorten the overall blade length- may be worth checking your adjustment limits in case...

ChrisB04/03/2018 15:36:10
394 forum posts
162 photos

Thanks Richard and John for you advice. Nothing to loose so I'll try to weld it first and see if it holds, if that fails will try to "braze" it, iirc the adjuster had plenty of slack to take... Good point on tig brazing John, never heared about it, but just did some reading on the subject - very interesting!

colin hawes04/03/2018 16:03:24
498 forum posts
18 photos

To be on the safe side you need to temper a welded blade at the weld as it may be brittle there. Colin

Robin King04/03/2018 16:26:45
81 forum posts

The only thing I'd add to the above is before you grind a scarf and silver solder a joint just check the blade over an inch or so either side of the joint - it's not unknown to find small cracks in the blade caused by twisting as the blade breaks. It's frustrating to do a beautiful silver soldered joint only to find the blade fail again half an inch away! If it is badly cracked then you might be able to shorten it but that depends on the minimum blade length you need for your machine bearing in mind the travel available on the tensioning mechanism - my Naerok bandsaw has nearly 3/4" available.

Peter Tucker04/03/2018 17:35:12
179 forum posts

Hi Chris,

Before you do anything as this is a new blade return it to your supplier for repair or replacement.

Peter.

RichardN04/03/2018 17:58:40
108 forum posts
9 photos
Posted by colin hawes on 04/03/2018 16:03:24:

To be on the safe side you need to temper a welded blade at the weld as it may be brittle there. Colin

Sounds like a sensible move- would just bringing a couple of inches either side of the weld up to red and let cool gently be sufficient? My welds have always worked, but not for long- I suspect this could be a good solution, thanks.

Speedy Builder504/03/2018 18:31:00
1800 forum posts
127 photos

Forget welding, silver solder with a small gas torch or even over the gas ring if you can support both halves. - as Journeman says. Then no need to temper after cooling etc.
BobH

ChrisB04/03/2018 20:36:39
394 forum posts
162 photos
Posted by Peter Tucker on 04/03/2018 17:35:12:

Hi Chris,

Before you do anything as this is a new blade return it to your supplier for repair or replacement.

Peter.

Well "almost new" take it as lightly used and still a lot of life left in it (if it were not broken that is!) apart form that taking it to the supplier is out of question as it came with the bandsaw from Italy.

Will give it a try tomorrow and report back, was in the process of slicing a 65mm steel bar when it broke - should be a good test if it holds. Thanks all for your help

vintagengineer04/03/2018 20:59:10
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468 forum posts
6 photos

Industrial bandsaws have butt welders on the side for making up blades. We used to make our own blades and weld them through a hole in the job to cut the centre out.

Martin Hamilton 104/03/2018 22:30:17
130 forum posts

A number of years ago I broke the blade on my metal cutting bandsaw, I need to finish a job quick so silver soldered it. I simply butted the break together with a aluminium backing strip ( ally to stop the solder from sticking ). Might of ground a v on the break & then silver soldered, still using the blade today.

Danny M2Z05/03/2018 09:19:56
avatar
740 forum posts
278 photos

ChrisB, there are a few photos in my album under 'Bandsaw blade brazing' along with a simple jig to chamfer the ends. I actually used silver solder and they hold together well. Get back if anything is not clear.

* Danny M *

Douglas Johnston05/03/2018 09:50:44
avatar
599 forum posts
32 photos

I have silver soldered blades for years and don't think I have ever had a joint fail. A decent scarf joint, make up a simple jig ( u-tube has plenty of ideas ), flux the overlap and place a small strip of silver solder under the joint and heat with torch. When I heat the joint I use two of these small gas torches that produce very small (about 4mm wide )flames and place one above and one below the joint. In this way you get very good localised heating without softening too much of the adjacent blade.

Doug

Russell Eberhardt05/03/2018 11:19:00
avatar
2476 forum posts
85 photos

 

Here's the very crude jig I made over ten years ago. Used for silver soldering scarfed joints and, like Doug, never had a joint fail. I flux the joint, place a very small bit if silver solder o the top and heat from underneath so that the solder is wicked through.

2018-03-05 11.03.40.jpg

2018-03-05 11.02.59.jpg

Russell

 

Edited By Russell Eberhardt on 05/03/2018 11:20:10

colin hawes05/03/2018 13:49:17
498 forum posts
18 photos
Posted by RichardN on 04/03/2018 17:58:40:
Posted by colin hawes on 04/03/2018 16:03:24:

To be on the safe side you need to temper a welded blade at the weld as it may be brittle there. Colin

Sounds like a sensible move- would just bringing a couple of inches either side of the weld up to red and let cool gently be sufficient? My welds have always worked, but not for long- I suspect this could be a good solution, thanks.

About 1/2 " either side of the weld should do. Temper to blue two or three times. Colin

RichardN05/03/2018 18:21:58
108 forum posts
9 photos

Cheers Colin. I’ll temper this one next time the torch is out, and try silver brazing the next one to fail...

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