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Bevel ?

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Daniel02/01/2018 11:46:57
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Perhaps a semantic question, but could anyone elucidate as to the difference between a chamfer and a bevel ?

It's probably not important, but has been bothering me of late.

Daniel

Michael Gilligan02/01/2018 12:01:08
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A very good question, Daniel yes

Wikipedia offers a reasonable distinction: **LINK**

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bevel

MichaelG.

Brian Sweeting02/01/2018 13:16:24
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It seems that it can be an open ended answer depending on whether you use the words as a noun or an adjective.

Found a good description here  **LINK**

You might say that a bevelled edge is found at the end of a wood chisel whilst you would chamfer the edge of a turned piece to remove the sharp edge.

JasonB02/01/2018 13:20:12
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Posted by Brian Sweeting on 02/01/2018 13:16:24:

You might say that a bevelled edge is found at the end of a wood chisel whilst you would chamfer the edge of a turned piece to remove the sharp edge.

The "Bevel edge" of wood chisels is along the back and does not refer to the primary and secondary bevels that form the cutting edge

Neil Wyatt02/01/2018 16:28:36
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I'll buy Michael's link. It fits with the idea that you chamfer a corner and bevel an edge.

Richard S202/01/2018 17:02:13
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As my Father described to me, a Bevel to be a relieved edge of unequal angles i.e. 44 deg or less, say on the edge/corners of a Mirror.

A chamfer to me is an equally relieved flat edge of 2 joining faces of usually 90 degrees. i.e as on a single or double chamfered Nut

A Fillet is an edge that is relieved in a rounded form.

Daniel02/01/2018 20:22:07
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Thank you all for the input, which demands some digestion.

It's the old hole /pit question all over.

Cooking children's dinner at the mo', but will digest.

Thank you all

MW02/01/2018 20:30:10
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My Clarke Cl430m lathe manual calls the topslide a "bevel cutting" feature.

Michael W

JohnF02/01/2018 21:15:51
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All the engineering drawings I have ever seen not one has shown a bevel, it has always been a 30deg Cham or a 45deg cham etc etc.

To me a bevel would be as on a mirror or small window pane,

I think it is more than likely its the terminology used in different trades to describe the same item e.g. in the unmaking trade a screw is a pin, a round rod or spindle is a wire, think about clocks and watches and the nomenclature changes again !

Any more thoughts ?

Edited By JohnF on 02/01/2018 21:17:05

Brian Sweeting02/01/2018 22:56:48
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Posted by JasonB on 02/01/2018 13:20:12:
Posted by Brian Sweeting on 02/01/2018 13:16:24:

 

You might say that a bevelled edge is found at the end of a wood chisel whilst you would chamfer the edge of a turned piece to remove the sharp edge.

The "Bevel edge" of wood chisels is along the back and does not refer to the primary and secondary bevels that form the cutting edge

I fully agree about bevel edged chisels which is why I said 'found at the end' to which you then confirm by talking about the primary and secondary bevels.

But if being pedantic then you have also confirmed the description of a bevel.

Daniel03/01/2018 00:01:57
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Well ...

Thank you Micheal and Brian for the links.

Does it help ? Not sure and still digesting.

For all practical purposes it would seem that the terms are largely interchangeable, but Brian's link casts a serious doubt. There would appear to be quite succinct differences in their definitions.

Not intending to troll, but I love these subtle differences in our vocabulary.

Daniel

Hopper03/01/2018 01:35:08
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When you knock the sharp edge off something by filing or machining a small flat along it, it's a chamfer. When you machine one side of a piece of metal at an angle, it's a bevel.

Ady103/01/2018 01:47:16
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bevvy is cheaper than champers

Bill Pudney03/01/2018 02:00:21
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I'm with Hopper. Then there is a "chamfer" at an angle other than 45 degrees. During my apprenticeship I was told that this is a "snape", however it was on the Isle of Wight and I've never heard it anywhere else!!

cheers

Bill

jason udall04/01/2018 07:12:57
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I guess this is a bit of a pointless ( though interesting nonetheless) discussion. ..drawings will clarify instantly the dimension. .
But just think of this..a screw is fitted to a machine...and then for reasons it is removed put to one side..The hole is drilled through clearance and the screw replaced..with a nut at far end...that screw is now a BOLT....
yes I know drilling out and adding nut is bodgy but it serves to illustrate.
English (even technical- roll yer sleeves up and get on with it- English) shows its long history in the oddities fossilised into it....
Bill Pudney04/01/2018 08:47:21
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I've always understood that a screw was threaded all the way to the head and a bolt only part way.

cheers

Bill

MW05/01/2018 08:23:22
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Posted by Bill Pudney on 04/01/2018 08:47:21:

I've always understood that a screw was threaded all the way to the head and a bolt only part way.

cheers

Bill

What does that make a stud then? cheeky

not done it yet05/01/2018 10:48:07
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I've always understood that a screw was threaded all the way to the head and a bolt only part way

I’ve always understood that bolts have nuts. Screws need not be threaded all the way along the shank, but bolts are not, as they need to be plain and sized for the hole. Cap screws may be threaded to the head as are coach screws (but not coach bolts).

Michael Gilligan05/01/2018 12:41:33
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Posted by Michael-w on 05/01/2018 08:23:22:

What does that make a stud then? cheeky

.

A healthy, virile, male.

devil MichaelG.

blowlamp05/01/2018 13:15:13
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All chamfers are bevels, but not all bevels are chamfers. face 1

Martin.

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