By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Oct 22nd

Carbide Tipped Tooling explained.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Chris Trice07/11/2017 10:50:43
avatar
1362 forum posts
9 photos

Found this video online which clearly explains all about tipped tooling that struck me as too good not to post for people new to the hobby. It also strikes me like a potentially good subject for the magazine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsFFWYo8ugw

XD 35107/11/2017 12:33:51
avatar
1326 forum posts
112 photos

Some of his videos are side splitting funny as well !

Another carbide tooling video was made by Adam booth ( abom79 ) that from memory was made with the help of a sales rep from Niagra tooling and i found it very informative .

Edited By XD 351 on 07/11/2017 12:34:37

Nick Hulme07/11/2017 18:54:26
703 forum posts
37 photos
Posted by XD 351 on 07/11/2017 12:33:51:

Some of his videos are side splitting funny as well !

Another carbide tooling video was made by Adam booth ( abom79 ) that from memory was made with the help of a sales rep from Niagra tooling and i found it very informative .

Edited By XD 351 on 07/11/2017 12:34:37

I love his videos and have loads of time for the guy but he will keep dropping one based on basic misunderstanding of things or poor technical terminology-

"Mainly Tungsten and Carbide powders pressed into a shape"

I can only guess that constant use of "Carbide" as a shorthand for "Tungsten Carbide" leads some people to think that tools are a mix of a metallic element, "Tungsten" and a "Carbide" of something entirely random or perhaps "Pure Carbide"?.

Maybe he means "Mainly Tungsten Carbide plus other Carbides" but the terminology is such that in getting it wrong it is so wrong as to be misleading to anyone in need of a "Beginner's Guide"

- Nick

John Reese07/11/2017 19:59:11
782 forum posts

Tungsten carbide inserts are made from tungsten carbide and other carbides with cobalt as a binder. Proportions vary according to the application.

Robin07/11/2017 20:58:59
avatar
315 forum posts

I thought that "Carbide" was just the new Chinese word for "High carbon steel" because they had quite worn that one out with cheap taps and stuff that shattered the moment you applied any real pressure face 22

MW07/11/2017 21:20:51
avatar
2050 forum posts
51 photos

Tnere is a very very well written article by a guy named mike Haughton which has just come out this month, all about carbides of all stripes. I wouldn't miss it. Hats off to him.

Michael W

jimmy b08/11/2017 04:57:15
avatar
516 forum posts
28 photos
+1 on the article in this month's MEW. Very well written

Jim
XD 35123/11/2017 02:02:58
avatar
1326 forum posts
112 photos

And for those who have ever wondered how they are made .

https://youtu.be/0QrynzJ_lZ4

Chris Trice23/11/2017 02:54:28
avatar
1362 forum posts
9 photos

Interesting.

OuBallie25/11/2017 14:13:06
avatar
1146 forum posts
661 photos

Recommendations please on which type of holder and insert/s to use on my BH600G, for basic turning using most grades of metal we hobbyists use.

Geoff - That TuffSaws 10/14 blade is GOOD!

XD 35126/11/2017 05:14:25
avatar
1326 forum posts
112 photos

Hi Geoff,

I usually use use an insert with a W for the first letter ( trigon shape ) for heavy or intermittent cuts and an insert with a T as the first letter ( triangle ) for general work .

The tool holder dictates the rest of the code ( other than chipbreaker style , grade and coating) like hole type ,clearance angle and size etc so you need to sort out the size of holder your lathe needs and then decide on insert shape .

Most people just buy a set of toolholders from a supplier then go from there and some sets use the same insert on all the holders so you only need one style of insert which for most users is very convenient .

Ian

fizzy26/11/2017 08:32:09
avatar
1614 forum posts
109 photos
Posted by XD 351 on 23/11/2017 02:02:58:

And for those who have ever wondered how they are made .

https://youtu.be/0QrynzJ_lZ4

very interesting, no wonder they aint cheap

SillyOldDuffer26/11/2017 10:17:37
4711 forum posts
1010 photos
Posted by fizzy on 26/11/2017 08:32:09:
Posted by XD 351 on 23/11/2017 02:02:58:

And for those who have ever wondered how they are made .

https://youtu.be/0QrynzJ_lZ4

very interesting, no wonder they aint cheap

The video that popped up after XD's recommendation is well worth watching too. About 30 minutes for hobbyists. A good explanation of HSS vs Carbide and the Pros&Cons of Brazed Carbide tools (beginner avoid). Finishes with an explanation of insert code numbers and why you might choose round, trigonal, triangular, square or rectangular inserts. Ends with a demo of an insert producing a carp finish with shallow cuts at low feed rate moving to perfect finish with a much deeper cut at a higher feed rate. Lesson learned: inserts are 'better' than HSS only if you drive them right! Makes the interesting comment that professional buyers ring up the rep and tell him the material being cut and the machine that will be used. The rep selects the best insert for the job and sends the invoice to someone else. Amateurs have to do their own research and pay the bills.

I liked the bit at the beginning where he machines HSS with a carbide cutter but the message is balanced. He follows up with good reasons for using HSS rather than carbide.

The humour might not be to everyone's taste. Be warned - I liked it!

Dave

 

Edited By SillyOldDuffer on 26/11/2017 10:19:02

OuBallie26/11/2017 11:37:25
avatar
1146 forum posts
661 photos

Thanks Ian.

Will check advertiser's offers.

Dave,

Watched that one as well and enjoy his humour.

Geoff - New router up and running.

SillyOldDuffer26/11/2017 12:24:24
4711 forum posts
1010 photos
Posted by OuBallie on 26/11/2017 11:37:25:

Dave,

Watched that one as well and enjoy his humour.

...

Doh, I've just realised that the link I posted is exactly the one Chris started the thread with. No idea how that happened. Feeling foolish...

blush

Harry Wilkes26/11/2017 14:29:56
avatar
719 forum posts
60 photos

I too am fan of 'This Old Tony' admire his skills but also enjoy the humour he injects into his video's

H

Terry Kirkup11/06/2019 16:56:52
avatar
46 forum posts
32 photos

Hi Gents/Ladies. You folk will know all of this but I'm just a few months in as a lathe owner. I've been tooling up since Christmas and can now do simple lathe work. I dived straight in with a Chinese QRTP and indexable tools and it's been like a drug. I just thought I'd share this in case it hasn't been let out on here. Although I have very limited understanding of most of it, it still has me completely mesmerized!

**LINK**

mark costello 111/06/2019 17:13:44
avatar
541 forum posts
12 photos

OOOOHHHHH it starts again. Welcome to the chip making asylum.

Terry Kirkup11/06/2019 17:37:01
avatar
46 forum posts
32 photos

haha, cheers Mark

old mart11/06/2019 17:52:48
576 forum posts
54 photos

Fortunately for people who want to try indexable tooling now, the affordable Chinese inserts and holders have improved greatly recently. I have stuff from all the major manufacturers as well as Chinese, and for hobby use, the cheap stuff from ebay is well worth the money. The only hss I have used on a lathe in the last ten years is in the form of twist drills.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
ChesterUK
Eccentric July 5 2018
Ausee.com.au
Meridienne oct 2019
cowbells
Eccentric Engineering
TRANSWAVE Converters
Warco
emcomachinetools
Allendale Electronics
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest