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Epoxy Resin

Are there differing qualities

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mick H25/08/2017 16:00:51
766 forum posts
28 photos

I know that fast and slow curing varieties are available but aside from that, is there any real difference in the quality/performance of epoxy resin adhesives. Putting it bluntly, is the stuff from the pound shop significantly different from the often much more expensive branded varieties.

Mick

not done it yet25/08/2017 17:13:07
6736 forum posts
20 photos

Yes, of course. Temperature range in use is just one of them.

Massimo Dalmonte25/08/2017 17:20:05
33 forum posts
18 photos

In general, the slower the cure, the better the qualities of the final result ( I had some 5 minute glue from a reputed brand that cured like some kind of gum, other were better) and a longer curing time allows for adjustments.

If you are thinking of epoxy for wood joints, this test:

**LINK**

gives food for thought.

Cheers,

Massimo

Hacksaw25/08/2017 17:36:46
463 forum posts
199 photos

. Today , i built a "shoe " on a injured hoof with urethane " Vetec Superfast ", 30 seconds cure , not epoxy I know but by God has it adhered ....!!!! Impressed .

Expensive ? £38 a tube..enough to do 2 feet.. so not too bad for this sort job

Here's the product , I'm already thinking of other uses for it , and looking to see who actually makes it , as if its " for horses " you pay double !!! I bet Loctite or 3 M make it

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_dMY5p0YXI     

 

Dohh..link wont go blue !

Edited By Hacksaw on 25/08/2017 17:37:29

Edited By Hacksaw on 25/08/2017 17:38:46

SillyOldDuffer25/08/2017 17:37:46
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8496 forum posts
1900 photos

I think the answer to that is 'maybe'. Epoxy has been around a long time and the chemistry of most products on the market is well understood. There's no particular reason why generic products cannot be made and sold without brand-name premium prices. Of course it may not be the latest gee-whiz formulation. Another source of good quality epoxy is surplus stock and production overruns. Provided it was stored properly and is stiil in date, it should be OK. On the downside, how careful would a Poundshop be buying and selling Epoxy? Not too smart I feel, but probably not much worse than a DIY chain. If quality really matters you should buy from a professional vendor who will fully support the product.

I've not had any problem with pound shop super glue, which I usually buy because at the rate I use it, most glue, cheap or expensive, goes off in the tube. I've only used Poundshop epoxy once and it was fine. Possibly I was lucky.

With glue and epoxy, what made the biggest difference to me was rigorously following the instructions, not where I bought it.

Dave

Edited By SillyOldDuffer on 25/08/2017 17:38:17

Neil Wyatt25/08/2017 17:58:57
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Posted by Hacksaw on 25/08/2017 17:36:46:

. Today , i built a "shoe " on a injured hoof with urethane " Vetec Superfast ", 30 seconds cure , not epoxy I know but by God has it adhered ....!!!! Impressed .

Expensive ? £38 a tube..enough to do 2 feet.. so not too bad for this sort job

If you were a Vet not a Farrier you could put £200 markup on that - per foot!

Neil

Neil Wyatt25/08/2017 18:01:33
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Some poundshop epoxy is awful, you could say it's poxy, and smells completely different.

Many 'own brand' versions are pretty good, but I must admit I (and I'm a tightwad) like Araldite and JB weld when I want to be sure of a good, long-lasting, result.

Neil

Hacksaw25/08/2017 18:03:53
463 forum posts
199 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 25/08/2017 17:58:57:
Posted by Hacksaw on 25/08/2017 17:36:46:

. Today , i built a "shoe " on a injured hoof with urethane " Vetec Superfast ", 30 seconds cure , not epoxy I know but by God has it adhered ....!!!! Impressed .

Expensive ? £38 a tube..enough to do 2 feet.. so not too bad for this sort job

If you were a Vet not a Farrier you could put £200 markup on that - per foot!

Neil

Sadly it was my daughters own horse ..so i had to swallow the cost..bloody horses, bloody kidssad Is it 3M 0474 repackaged I wonder

Hacksaw25/08/2017 18:06:01
463 forum posts
199 photos

No Nonsense superglue from Screwfix is mighty powerful and in cheap big bottles !

the artfull-codger25/08/2017 20:22:44
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294 forum posts
28 photos

A Man after my own heart Neil, "frugal" with everything, I like slow cure araldite & jb weld which I think is stronger, you can use it as an adhesive as well as building up parts, it has an indefinite shelf life & it can make an amateur backyard caster into a professional foundryman!! he he.

Rik Shaw25/08/2017 21:17:48
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1480 forum posts
398 photos

On the subject of indefinite shelf left, I have a small bottle of Loctite which has a "use by" date something like six years ago but is still very usable. It was used by an aerospace company until it came to me after it reached its expiry date. >>

I quite like the idea of a high flying hand me down keeping my parts intact – ooer missus!>>

Rik>>

Danny M2Z26/08/2017 02:47:26
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963 forum posts
2 photos

I have tried many types of epoxy adhesives over the years and came to the same conclusion as Neil and the artfull-codger.

Cured 5 minute type epoxy's seem to go soft and yellow after a few years of service (model aircraft use) but decent 24 hour epoxy (eg, Araldite) cured joints are still as tough as the day that they were applied 20+ years ago.

Correct mixing ratios and thorough consolidation are very important.

There are many varieties so pick the the most suitable type for the job. Here is a linky to one of my favourite brands although one has to hunt around for a supplier **LINK**

This grade has been very useful around my workshop btw **LINK**

* Danny M *

Edited By Danny M2Z on 26/08/2017 02:53:42

Nick_G26/08/2017 03:12:27
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1808 forum posts
744 photos

.

Ahhhhh. - JB weld, Isopan 38, thick pint and loctite. .............. My very best friends. smileyblush

Nick

Gordon W26/08/2017 09:15:33
2011 forum posts

For small jobs that don't matter much I've been buying the tiny tubes in packs of 4 from poundshops. Seems to work well and minimal waste. Still buy the correct stuff for engineering jobs tho'.

Ian S C26/08/2017 12:33:28
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Last time I was in "town", I was looking round one of the places where I buy engineering supplies, and came across a new stand, JB weld, it wasn't just fast and slow filler, but epoxy glue, shaft and screw lock, next time I'm in I'll see if they have a catalogue. quite a lot of competition for Loctite.

Ian S C

richardandtracy26/08/2017 17:30:02
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943 forum posts
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Also, cure temperature alters strength. Doing work for an aircraft interior company stress office we found 4 hrs at 80C gave a stronger result for Redux 420 than a month cure at room temp.

Regards

Richard.

Neil Wyatt26/08/2017 18:38:33
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Posted by Nick_G on 26/08/2017 03:12:27:

.thick pint

Barley wine?

Neil Wyatt26/08/2017 18:51:51
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Posted by Ian S C on 26/08/2017 12:33:28:

Last time I was in "town", I was looking round one of the places where I buy engineering supplies, and came across a new stand, JB weld, it wasn't just fast and slow filler, but epoxy glue, shaft and screw lock, next time I'm in I'll see if they have a catalogue. quite a lot of competition for Loctite.

Ian S C

I got sent a box of JB Weld samples way back (oh the perks of being an editor!) One I found surprisingly useful was the black silicone sealent/adhesive. I never thought of using 'gasket' type material as a glue before but it works well for purposes where you need a bit of give. See the next MEW for an example!

Neil

duncan webster26/08/2017 19:43:01
3928 forum posts
61 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 26/08/2017 18:38:33:
Posted by Nick_G on 26/08/2017 03:12:27:

.thick pint

Barley wine?

Neil, if you're drinking Barley Wine by the pint I think you should go and see someone!

Ian Welford26/08/2017 20:28:26
299 forum posts

If he's drinking it by the pint he'll be seeing multiples of anyone wink 2

Re the original question I use araldite 24 hour slow cure as like someone mentioned the 5 minute went to a sort of hard toffee condition after a few years ( model aircraft use). The slow cure is still hard after 20 years ( and the models in one piece but still in the loft I admit)

Ian

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