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paul rayner10/07/2017 21:55:13
182 forum posts
46 photos

20170710_213352.jpg

Hi All

As you can see I have a rather large inclusion on the port face of this casting. Unfortunatly I am unable to send it back. Do I either a) do nothing as it may not interfere with the performance? b) fill it with JB weld? c) plug it with cast iron? the last option as I see it is probebly the best but i'm reluctant to do this (I'm still a bit of a novice). What are your thoughts on this. Thanks in advance for all replys.

regards

Paul

Neil Wyatt10/07/2017 22:09:35
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19033 forum posts
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As its a bearing surface, I'd probably plug it, but using brass or gunmetal.

That said, it looks like a stationary engine cylinder, not a loco cylinder so it may never work hard and JB weld will probably to the job - choose the original, slow setting flavour.

Neil

paul rayner10/07/2017 22:18:13
182 forum posts
46 photos

Hi Neil

Yes it is a stationary engine cylinder. Why would you use brass or gunmetal and not the parent metal to plug it??

regards

Paul

Neil Wyatt10/07/2017 22:28:14
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It's much easier to make a small plug out of brass than cast iron, especially if you want to thread it.

Neil

paul rayner10/07/2017 22:37:44
182 forum posts
46 photos

ahh I see. I never thought about threading it. I was thinking of sticking it in with JB weld.

thanks for reply

regards

paul

duncan webster10/07/2017 22:49:14
3987 forum posts
65 photos

It doesn't encroach on the ports, there looks to be room to make a seal on the valve chest. If it's blind live with it

Edited By duncan webster on 10/07/2017 22:49:37

Nick_G10/07/2017 22:56:24
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1808 forum posts
744 photos

.

Just being curious but why can you not send it back.?

Nick

Hacksaw10/07/2017 22:57:10
463 forum posts
199 photos

Shame. If it was a racing two stroke, it would be called an auxiliary port laugh

paul rayner10/07/2017 23:05:04
182 forum posts
46 photos

Hi Nick

I bought it as a set of castings from the doncaster show they had a few all the same from a workshop clearance. It is very very similar to stuart turners victoria. I'm actually using the plans with quite a few tweaks here and there. must admit its been a bit of a head scratcher so far as I said before i'm still a novice finding my feet.

Paul

Nick_G10/07/2017 23:14:02
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1808 forum posts
744 photos

.

So are you saying it's not a casting of Stuarts.?

Nick

Maurice10/07/2017 23:24:28
469 forum posts
50 photos

I had an old Stuart No.1 that I was restoring. This had very poor ports, and an inclusion right next to a port. I don't know how it ever ran. After taking some advice, I milled the whole port area away to a depth of about an eighth of an inch then fitted a plate of cast iron (a spare steam chest cover) in the excavation with epoxy resin: then milled new ports. Worked very well.

vintagengineer10/07/2017 23:30:52
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468 forum posts
6 photos

You could braze or silver solder it up and re-machine. I had T13 Bugatti inlet port on the block, when I filled the radiator up water poured out of the carburetor!

Stewart Hart11/07/2017 05:50:48
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673 forum posts
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Just cover the complete port face with a brass or bronze plate with the ports cut in it, this a perfectly acceptable way of working some designs use this method, Tubal Cains Beam Engine Mary was designed using this method.

Stew

mechman4811/07/2017 07:17:32
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2947 forum posts
468 photos

For future ref... I had an inclusion fault with my S10V, similar to the above, what I did was to use cast iron filings mixed with 2 part epoxy resin to plug the inclusion, worked fine. I had earlier decided to collect & keep CI filings in a tin with thought 'just in case' in mind, usually when I've filed the flashings of castings, these tend to produce fine CI dust so easily mixes with any binding media. I've done the same with brass filings.

George.

JasonB11/07/2017 07:50:23
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22750 forum posts
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If the void in the underside of the valve will move over the hole which it looks like it may do then you could get steam/air escaping down the exhaust.

Can't see the exact shape of the hole but if it is just half an egg shape then it is going to get smaller as you machine the port face so may clear the valve.

I would do as Stew says and machine up a thin piece of CI about 1mm thick, cut the ports in that and retain with a couple of CSK screws that fall under the steam chest edges, smear of JBWeld or Araldite to seal. Steam chest studs will hold it firmly in place on assembly

paul rayner11/07/2017 14:59:23
182 forum posts
46 photos

Thank you all for all your reply's. I think I'm going to try and make the cavity in the valve smaller and see how I get on with that. I'ts a great idea of stew and Jason B but i'm not confident enough to cut a 1mm slice. the cavity is indeed egg shaped and is about 4mm deep. I will keep you informed of how I get on. thank you all once again.

Paul

Neil Wyatt11/07/2017 16:49:05
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The point that the valve will seal on the surrounding metal is a good one, if you fill with JB Weld it shouldn't wear into a low spot.

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