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John Alexander Stewart29/06/2017 12:47:22
771 forum posts
52 photos
Posted by Hopper on 29/06/2017 03:26:25:
Posted by Jon on 29/06/2017 01:00:48:

Wouldn't fancy doing the clutch myself on FWD cars, RWD no problem on axle stands.

I'm hoping the clutch never goes out on my recently purchased Toyota Corolla. You have to pull the entire engine and transmission unit out of the car as a lump before you can split them to change the clutch plate. Yikes.

Just had the "olde" 2006 Toyota Corolla Matrix clutch go for the second time, 60,000km on this one. Last time it was circa $2,000 CAD to get it replaced, this time, the car was sold "as-is, where-is" to a mechanic who can do it on his own time and give it to one of his kids.

What to do? Go back to being a 1 car family; the savings from maintenance and insurance funds 1 overseas trip to a Model Engineering show in the UK per year. (wife's an accountant; we know down to the last penny what a car costs over its' lifetime) AND - the exercise of cycling and walking and talking is certain to give me abs of steel, just like Neil right?

vintagengineer30/06/2017 21:42:14
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468 forum posts
6 photos

DMF are there for the benefit of the manufacturers. They allow them to make cheaper crnakshafts and lighter gearboxes. There purpose is to take up any heavy sudden loads. If you replace them with a solid flywheel you will break the crankshaft. It's all about money.

Posted by Muzzer on 29/06/2017 07:46:12:

Posted by Jon on 29/06/2017 01:00:48:

Always have doubts on current DMF clutch, can actually hear it at times and serves no purpose except far greater cost, reduced life just to get better emissions.

No, they are to give refinement (low torsional vibrations) without loss of driveability (low flywheel moment of inertia and mass). Only a very tenuous link to emissions.

Like any component, there is no reason why they can't be designed to outlast the rest of the vehicle. But some vehicle manufacturers aren't very good at designing and developing their products.....

Murray

Hopper01/07/2017 02:07:00
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4648 forum posts
101 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 29/06/2017 09:42:00:
Posted by Russ B on 29/06/2017 08:12:05:

Any chance you can get an inspection camera into the bell housing through a cover to look for any debris?

I'm with John Stevenson, ie hydraulic piston stuck, exactly the same thing happened on my Focus, I just jabbed the clutch pedal a few times and it popped back out.

I think it was caused by the end stop in the pedal box being bent back, allowing the pedal to be pushed to far but I don't know, I just took a bit easier after that.

Now, lets have the truth - you were really racing the young boys in Morrisons car park and doing doughnuts in reverse.......... own up...

Lots of jabbing does nothing and it feels normal

If it is stuck though, how else would I unstick it?

If you can get to the slave cylinder and pull it off, along with any linkage or pushrod etc attached to it, the clutch should then engage if a stuck cylinder is in fact the problem.

Hopper01/07/2017 02:09:04
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4648 forum posts
101 photos
Posted by John Alexander Stewart on 29/06/2017 12:47:22:
Posted by Hopper on 29/06/2017 03:26:25:
Posted by Jon on 29/06/2017 01:00:48:

Wouldn't fancy doing the clutch myself on FWD cars, RWD no problem on axle stands.

I'm hoping the clutch never goes out on my recently purchased Toyota Corolla. You have to pull the entire engine and transmission unit out of the car as a lump before you can split them to change the clutch plate. Yikes.

Just had the "olde" 2006 Toyota Corolla Matrix clutch go for the second time, 60,000km on this one. Last time it was circa $2,000 CAD to get it replaced, this time, the car was sold "as-is, where-is" to a mechanic who can do it on his own time and give it to one of his kids.

What to do? Go back to being a 1 car family; the savings from maintenance and insurance funds 1 overseas trip to a Model Engineering show in the UK per year. (wife's an accountant; we know down to the last penny what a car costs over its' lifetime) AND - the exercise of cycling and walking and talking is certain to give me abs of steel, just like Neil right?

LOL that was just what I did not need to hear! As it is my only car. But so far so good and the car has only 80,000km of non-urban use so should be plenty of life left in the clutch.

Circlip01/07/2017 11:46:24
1129 forum posts

Clutch life is directly proportional to the thickness of Lead on the left clog sole. Had to drive a Directors BMW many years ago (Long before Beemers were NOT a pain on the road) to travel to a company about 150 miles away. Became quite obvious it wouldn't take anything greater than VERY gentle acceleration before clutch slipping. Needed new one with 30,000 miles on clock, he was known to drive like a prat though.

Regards Ian.

John Rudd01/07/2017 12:18:35
1372 forum posts
66 photos

The clutch on my last Mondeo estate ( 10 plate! ) didnt even make 28000 miles before starting to give problems....

First sign there was something wrong, was it would drop out of cruise if going up the least incline, then the typical slipping in 5/6th....however the old hand brake on in 4th test showed it ok.....

After a trip to the dealer to confirm, I got rid. The bill for £1500 was coming my way......

Mike01/07/2017 12:41:06
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713 forum posts
6 photos

I had the clutch go on a Vauxhall Astra 1600, bought second-hand with only 18,000 on the clock. Close examination of the documentation showed that the first owner was a very large, nation-wide driving school. I should have known better than to buy an ex-driving school car - the clutch must have had a very hard life. Moral: when buying second-hand, always check on previous owners before parting with any cash, and avoid driving school cars like the plague!

not done it yet01/07/2017 13:06:35
4733 forum posts
16 photos

Clutch life is directly proportional to the thickness of Lead on the left clog sole

Up to a point. My feelings is that it is more likely the idiots that continually slip the clutch. Ideally it should be 'in' or 'out'. Watch for the number of numpties that slip the clutch to hold a vehicle on an incline, rather than applying the handbrake. Ex thought that she should just keep her foot on the clutch pedal, in case she needed to operate it quickly.

Neil Wyatt01/07/2017 13:13:10
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Moderator
17970 forum posts
709 photos
77 articles

I once had a long journey with a numptie who though the clutch was an on/off switch. I really ought to have worn a neck brace for a week after that ride. I did ask him if he found the clutch wore out quickly on his car, and he said yes I've had to change it twice...

Neil

vintagengineer01/07/2017 21:30:49
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468 forum posts
6 photos

Just sold a British made Honda CRV with 250k on the clock and it was still on it's original clutch. It's down to who makes them and who drives them.

John Haine02/07/2017 08:58:58
3169 forum posts
171 photos

Neil, just to save reading the whole thread, are your wheels back on the road now and what was the problem?

Thanks, John.

jimmy b02/07/2017 09:44:49
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649 forum posts
38 photos
Posted by John Haine on 02/07/2017 08:58:58:

Neil, just to save reading the whole thread, are your wheels back on the road now and what was the problem?

Thanks, John.

yes, what was the problem and have you sorted it?

Neil Wyatt05/07/2017 19:05:02
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Moderator
17970 forum posts
709 photos
77 articles

No, still awaiting a decision, now I have alternative wheels and lots of work - this morning I was earning money wandering round a country park photographing flowers and insects

Unwelcome news for the client, one of the flowers I photographed was a HUGE specimen of Giant Hogweed.

Hacksaw05/07/2017 19:17:31
428 forum posts
173 photos

me too, but last night . I dropped my camera on the lens last year and it doesn't focus very well now . cryingimg_5125.jpg

Edited By Hacksaw on 05/07/2017 19:17:59

Neil Wyatt05/07/2017 20:24:54
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Moderator
17970 forum posts
709 photos
77 articles

That's lovely Hacksaw.

Here's my hoverfly. Worth a right click and full size:

john carruthers06/07/2017 08:15:59
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604 forum posts
176 photos

>>with a numptie who though the clutch was an on/off switch.<<

My old man was the opposite, he would ride the clutch for miles.The pulling away revs increased as his hearing declined.
The local garage replaced it, then six months later it was back for another.

I had a quiet word with Pete (the garage man) and we found a Fiat racing clutch plate with sintered linings, that lasted several years wink

mark costello 106/07/2017 17:48:59
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593 forum posts
12 photos

FIL would get to about 2 MPH in first gear then shift to high to save gas. Engine protesting all the way to about 35MPH. That WAS top speed for Him. He threatened to drive only 20 mph when gas went to .85 cents a gallon. Said They were trying to make Him spend all His money on gas.

mark costello 106/07/2017 17:51:12
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593 forum posts
12 photos

Would edit the above message if I could figure out how. Misers make great ancestors.wink

Colin Heseltine06/07/2017 20:24:24
419 forum posts
125 photos

I have to agree with the fact that clutch slip causes more wear than heavy right foot. I ran a Mk5 Cortina for around 120K miles, a lot of which all of which was towing a car trailer and race car. Always went straight up box, changing gear at around 5000 revs all way up box. Never had a problem, neither when pulling a big fully loaded caravan. My other half eats clutches in her cars.

Vic06/07/2017 21:01:57
2511 forum posts
14 photos

When I took my old car in for service a year or two ago I asked if it had a DMF and the receptionist said "No, you're ok it's got a proper clutch"! laugh I'm hoping the new replacement (same make and model) is the same, I expect so.

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