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Small cable connecting

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Rod Ashton02/06/2017 10:56:51
281 forum posts
12 photos

I am upgrading an old CNC router and have lots of small stepper cables to join up new to old. Could use small "chocolate blocks" but would prefer something smaller, like a little crimp or solder ferrule. Then I can group them together tidily with some heat shrink.

Any suggestions gratefully received.

Chris Shelton02/06/2017 11:05:59
avatar
77 forum posts
45 photos

Hi, how about soldering them and heat shrink tubing, or the automotive red butt connectors.

maurice bennie02/06/2017 11:15:08
164 forum posts
1 photos

Hi Rod , MAPLIN shops have a large selection of all sizes of connectors of all shapes. They are on the internet.

"MAPLIN electronics " hope there is one near you . good luck Maurice.

John Rudd02/06/2017 11:16:21
1365 forum posts
58 photos

There are butt connectors that are pre insulated. I have removed the plastic from them, soldered wires then heatshrink sleeve covered them...

Jon Gibbs02/06/2017 11:18:40
738 forum posts

If the cable is braided and the joint subject to vibration then crimping is preferred because solder joints lack flexibility and can crack through fatigue.

If you can position the joints away from vibration and strain though, solder joints will be fine and much more compact.

Jon

Rod Ashton02/06/2017 11:19:29
281 forum posts
12 photos

Chris - yes thanks I have considered both options but I have 10 wires in each bunch x3 off steppers. This gets a bit bulky even with spacing out. Probably not a more suitable solution, but thought I would inquire!

Speedy Builder502/06/2017 12:24:34
1741 forum posts
118 photos

Think telephone cables when they jointed 100 pair cables, in a tent no the side of the road !!

trainee-engineers-at-cable-jointing-school-brentwood-1952-138579907645302601-131209170706.jpg
telephonejoint.jpg

Brian Sweeting02/06/2017 12:42:20
347 forum posts
1 photos

If they are small cables then I would recommend press fit connectors, these are self sealing. I have used them when at work on machinery.

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/2-way-jelly-crimp-connectors-100-pack-n72dv

Rod Ashton02/06/2017 12:55:44
281 forum posts
12 photos

Brian - Thanks. Ordered a pack of those. Never seen them before. - I had best buy a tent too, in case things get out of hand.

Nick Hulme03/12/2017 00:48:13
672 forum posts
37 photos

Based on Scotchlock, ideal for telecoms.

Martin Cargill03/12/2017 07:15:33
99 forum posts

You can purchase uninsulated crimp ferrules that are intended to be used on the ends of multi strand wires going into contactors etc. They are available in a multitude of diameters. I have used them (along with heat shrink tubing) to make very effective joints in cables.

Dave Martin03/12/2017 08:10:14
101 forum posts
11 photos

Rod, just a little caution - I believe those Telecom type connectors are intended for use with solid single-core copper wire, rather than the stranded one would normally find on motors and machine wiring.

Dave

Journeyman03/12/2017 09:31:01
avatar
590 forum posts
90 photos

Crimping is the way to go. Use a bootlace ferrule and cover the join with heat-shrink sleeving, not the quickest method but reliable:

bootlace.jpg

Used this to extend cables for the 3D printer.

John

not done it yet03/12/2017 10:46:44
2906 forum posts
11 photos

Computers have managed with multi cable connectors. Must be something that will fit, somewhere -even an ECU on a scrap car?

Neil A03/12/2017 12:52:37
36 forum posts

Have a look at *Rapid Electronics* web site, they have a very large selection of multi pole crimp connectors. I have usually found what I am after there. Otherwise I go to RS. They are not always the cheapest, but you only want to do these connections once.

Neil

Clive Foster03/12/2017 13:04:18
1703 forum posts
46 photos

One issue with the telecoms style gel crimp connectors is the low current rating, in round numbers they are typically 50 mA at 50 V.

Being an old fashioned sort I prefer the twist together, older, sleeve and heat shrink route. Staggering the joints makes for a less bulky, but rather longer, junction. If you re worried about vibration then binding in a stiffener should sort the issue. A single conductor out of a three core mains cable should be ample. Leave the insulation on. Vibration can be areal issue but probably not a home shop worry.

Clive

SillyOldDuffer03/12/2017 13:53:48
4275 forum posts
880 photos

I call this a Post Office Splice and I think it may be what Clive calls a Staggered Joint in his post.

First strip and lay the two wires crossed end to end.

dsc04968.jpg

Then twist the two wires together, ideally finishing with a couple of tight turns at each end. (My example isn't the best!)

dsc04970.jpg

Finish by soldering and insulating with heat shrink tube or tape. As you see in the photo I made the classic 'Electricians Mistake'. This is forgetting to fit a tube, grommet or shroud on the wire before making the connection such that you have to take it all apart again.

Dave

Edited By SillyOldDuffer on 03/12/2017 13:54:10

Dave Martin03/12/2017 14:01:46
101 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 03/12/2017 13:53:48:

I call this a Post Office Splice and I think it may be what Clive calls a Staggered Joint in his post......

Dave (S.O.D.)

I'm pretty sure when Clive mentioned staggering the joints, what he was referring to is if there are multiple distinct cables, and hence multiple joints, staggering them so the final 'bundle' isn't as fat:

-------------------====---
-----------====-----------
--====--------------------

Dave (IOM)

SillyOldDuffer03/12/2017 14:16:07
4275 forum posts
880 photos
Posted by Dave Martin on 03/12/2017 14:01:46:
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 03/12/2017 13:53:48:

I call this a Post Office Splice and I think it may be what Clive calls a Staggered Joint in his post......

Dave (S.O.D.)

I'm pretty sure when Clive mentioned staggering the joints, what he was referring to is if there are multiple distinct cables, and hence multiple joints, staggering them so the final 'bundle' isn't as fat:

-------------------====---
-----------====-----------
--====--------------------

Dave (IOM)

Thanks Dave - that makes sense, I'm sure you're right. Staggering would also reduce the risk of an insulation failure as well: I never quite trust tape.

David George 104/12/2017 22:17:07
avatar
784 forum posts
282 photos

In the last place I worked they bought a CNC spark erode with 4 axis control in an auction and some nice person had disconnected it with a hacksaw instead of unplugging and unscrewing the cables between the control cabinet and the machine body. I was given the job to re-connect all the wiring and after a few days got it working. After a few trials I found that using bootlace ferules that had the plastic end removed by holding it on to a grinding wheel on the end for a few seconds you can slide the remainder off and just crimp the cables not forgetting to have a piece of shrink tube over first. I used various sizes as the cables were not all the same and some were control and some were power for the drives etc. I then wrapped the joint cables in each bundle with spiral wrap and a tape to join the original mesh cover.

David

Edited By David George 1 on 04/12/2017 22:17:56

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