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BA thread mnemonic

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charadam01/04/2017 00:27:19
179 forum posts
6 photos

I am sure that I remember being taught that:

All Boys Can Eat Good Jam Leaving None

would always remind me of BA thread sizes.

But I cannot remember why.

ANy other victims of 1960s trade training who can help?

peak401/04/2017 01:50:03
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853 forum posts
71 photos

Not directly, but this forum might shed a little light on your query;

**LINK**

Regards

Bill

JA01/04/2017 09:17:26
788 forum posts
44 photos
Posted by charadam on 01/04/2017 00:27:19:

I am sure that I remember being taught that:

All Boys Can Eat Good Jam Leaving None

would always remind me of BA thread sizes.

But I cannot remember why.

ANy other victims of 1960s trade training who can help?

What am I trying to remember?

JA

Neil Wyatt01/04/2017 09:23:49
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Moderator
16585 forum posts
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Posted by charadam on 01/04/2017 00:27:19:

I am sure that I remember being taught that:

All Boys Can Eat Good Jam Leaving None

would always remind me of BA thread sizes.

But I cannot remember why.

ANy other victims of 1960s trade training who can help?

Sound's like a way of remembering which letter drills to use for something, but all too large for BA.

Neil

Ian S C01/04/2017 11:02:26
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7447 forum posts
230 photos

Found it: A; 6 BA. B; 4 BA. C; 2 BA. E; 1/4" BSF. G; 5/16" BSF. J; 3/8" BSF. L; 7/16 BSF. N; 1/2" BSF.

I have not figured out the tie up between the letters, and the thread sizes, I'll leave that to someone else.

Ian S C

John Flack01/04/2017 13:01:28
169 forum posts

Reminds me of the southern part of a canal in east London ,BOW LOCKS written large in white letters on a wharehouse wall in the 1970s

roy entwistle01/04/2017 13:42:38
1033 forum posts

Aren't they clearance, from memory E is 1/4"

Roy

Russell Eberhardt01/04/2017 13:58:29
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2484 forum posts
85 photos
Posted by roy entwistle on 01/04/2017 13:42:38:

Aren't they clearance, from memory E is 1/4"

Roy

Yes, but that's the only one!

Russell

Gordon W01/04/2017 16:09:59
2011 forum posts

I've always found it easier to remember the actual sequence ,rather than the daft rhymes. Colours of the rainbow etc.

SillyOldDuffer01/04/2017 18:42:00
4723 forum posts
1010 photos

I thought "All Boys Can Eat Good Jam Leaving None" might be a Google-whack, but no. The other entry ays:

Another Mnemonic for you.
"All Boys Can Eat Good Jam Leaving None"
Relates to bolt sizes used on British made aircraft.
(When we made aircraft that is!!!)

I'm still none the wiser.

Dave (Who should be working)

Bandersnatch01/04/2017 18:47:19
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1249 forum posts
40 photos

Hm ... original post was in the first hour of April 1st ....

Michael Gilligan01/04/2017 20:21:11
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14024 forum posts
609 photos
Posted by Bandersnatch on 01/04/2017 18:47:19:

Hm ... original post was in the first hour of April 1st ....

.

Oh Ye of little Faith !!

Table 11 in this document gives the sequence: **LINK**

http://scribd-download.com/download/module-06-b1-notes_588c7bf76454a73d0835c224_txt

The mnemonic is just a mnemonic

MichaelG.

daveb01/04/2017 23:28:11
609 forum posts
10 photos
Posted by John Flack on 01/04/2017 13:01:28:

Reminds me of the southern part of a canal in east London ,BOW LOCKS written large in white letters on a wharehouse wall in the 1970s.

I well remember that sign, usually seen when sitting in the evening traffic jam to Blackwall tunnel. Dave

Clive Foster02/04/2017 00:26:37
1845 forum posts
59 photos

Further to Ian's post:-

Aircraft bolts were / are(?) designated by a letter and length code independent of actual thread size and type. Not all letters are used. That mnemomic gives the letters corresponding to the first few valid aircraft bolt sizes in the old BA-BSF system. As tabulated by Ian.

I imagine the missing letters were assigned to sizes that aren't, in practice, used. Possibly the system is used in fields other than aviation and some of the missing letters, and associated bolts, may be used. Probably done that way to ensure that ordinary bolts didn't get slotted into aircraft installations which frequently had both higher than standard strength requirements and closer fits.

Clive

Michael Gilligan02/04/2017 00:41:49
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14024 forum posts
609 photos

For those who might be wary of following the link that I posted earlier; I have here quoted the specifically relevant text, verbatim: ... The formatting is a little challenging, but the information is there.

MichaelG.

.

Note: In the earlier UK system (which may be encountered on older, or homeconstructed, light aircraft), bolts more than ¼ inch diameter are normally BSF, whilst bolts less than ¼ inch diameter (and most screws) are BA. Both of these items also use a number to represent their nominal length and a letter code (as can be seen in Table 11) to identify their diameter. Other bolts of this era may have nicks at the corners of the head (High Tensile Steel) or a raised ring on the bolt head (Cold Rolled) to assist differentiation of their particular designations. Table 11 EXAMPLES OF BA AND BSF BOLT AND SCREW CODES
Code Size Code Size

A B C E G J L N

6 BA
4 BA 2 BA 1/4� BSF

5/16" BSF
3/ 8" BSF

7/16" BSF 1/2" BSF

P Q S U W X Y Z

9/16" BSF 5/8� BSF 3/4" BSF 3/4" BSF 7/8" BSF 1" BSF 12 BA 10 BA 8 BA 8 BA

 
Gary Wooding02/04/2017 07:16:23
582 forum posts
138 photos

Does anybody remember this one?

"Some People Have Curly Black Hair Though Partly Bald"

Michael Gilligan02/04/2017 07:59:24
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14024 forum posts
609 photos

Posted by Gary Wooding on 02/04/2017 07:16:23:

Does anybody remember this one?

"Some People Have Curly Black Hair Though Partly Bald"

.

Almost ...

My Dad taught it to me as:

"Some People Have Curly Brown Hair 'Til Practically Bald"

... which is near enough the same [and both are true].

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 02/04/2017 08:11:27

Martin 10002/04/2017 09:28:50
250 forum posts
6 photos

On the subject of aircraft bolts this incident with a BAC 1-11 windscreen comes to mind

**LINK**

colin hawes02/04/2017 09:46:10
501 forum posts
18 photos

Some People Have Curly Black Hair Through Perpetual Brushing. That's when the opposite was perpendicular. Colin

Ian S C02/04/2017 12:31:17
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7447 forum posts
230 photos

Martin, a very interesting report. In my time in the hanger 8-32 bolts/screws were not freely available, they were not to be used in structural areas, 10-32 being the minimum size, and this was on light aircraft, although we did go up to DC-3.

It doesn't help when the aircraft windscreen is built inside out, relying on the strength of the bolts alone to hold a 60lb windscreen in place. From my working with parts from USA, the windscreen would come with the correct bolts ready for fitting.

Ian S C

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