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Why do they do that,

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Russell Eberhardt08/03/2017 16:45:05
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2728 forum posts
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Why do they put the handle on that side of the saddle apron?

2017-03-05 17.54.16.jpg

Russell

Brian Wood08/03/2017 16:53:06
2549 forum posts
39 photos

Russell,

​I don't know, but is typical of lathe designs from the USA. Tongue in cheek of course, but could it be that the typical American machinist regarded himself as so macho that it didn't matter?!

Brian

SverreE08/03/2017 16:57:37
22 forum posts
14 photos

Hello;

Left hand on the saddle apron and right hand on the cross-slide or top slide...? That's how I use my Blomqvist lathe (a South Bend clone).

Sverre

Edited By SverreE on 08/03/2017 17:02:23

MW08/03/2017 17:02:53
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2051 forum posts
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Probably because having the handle nearer to where the tool is doing the work, on the headstock end, helps with the accuracy of movement on the saddle.

Michael W

Roger Williams 208/03/2017 18:31:48
346 forum posts
3 photos

Russell, its a crap idea isnt it. Whichever hand you use, its in the firing line. My DSG is on the left and so is the Hardinge. Designed by a masochist.

Peter Simpson 108/03/2017 18:38:03
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206 forum posts
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I was just thinking about the same subject the other day. I have a Myford S7 which is a joy to use, I also have a Boxford ME. which has the handle on the opposite side of the carriage, you are forever getting hot swalf on the back of your hand.

Neil Wyatt08/03/2017 19:05:46
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So you can twiddle the saddle wheel and topslide at the same time

duncan webster08/03/2017 19:12:16
3919 forum posts
61 photos

So that when you've got your hand on the half nut lever screwcutting up to a shoulder (with buttocks clenched) you are out of the firing line. Having said all that I think it's rubbish as well, you don't do that much screwcutting, and when you do you don't produce that much swarf. Colchesters have the handle on the right, half nuts on left. Is it a UK/USA thing?

JA08/03/2017 19:35:43
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Posted by Peter Simpson 1 on 08/03/2017 18:38:03:

I was just thinking about the same subject the other day. I have a Myford S7 which is a joy to use, I also have a Boxford ME. which has the handle on the opposite side of the carriage, you are forever getting hot swalf on the back of your hand.

You never win, though. The handle may be in the right place on the Myford but lead screw clasp nut lever is not. That gets the swarf and even worse the cutting fluid.

JA

Another JohnS08/03/2017 20:30:34
832 forum posts
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Posted by Brian Wood on 08/03/2017 16:53:06:

Russell,

​I don't know, but is typical of lathe designs from the USA. Tongue in cheek of course, but could it be that the typical American machinist regarded himself as so macho that it didn't matter?!

Brian

Cripes, and I thought it was an European thing! My Kerry and Emco lathes (i.e. 100% of my lathes) have the Handwheel on the left hand side.

(Not in USA, but close) John.

Phil Whitley08/03/2017 21:19:20
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1437 forum posts
147 photos

The Colchesters, and I believe, some others have the handwheel on the left on straight bed machines, and on the right on gap bed models, if the chips are burning you, use coolant, and if you get Doubleboosts "stringy bastards" use a chipbreaker type tool, it is not good to have a metal birds nest flying round the chuck, ask me how I know! It is worst when the hot ones fly up your rolled up sleeves and stick to your shirt! Also, when welding, take your watch off, and or wear gloves, I have a lovely little scar where a ball of weld metal jumped under my watch strap and stuck, and it was sore for bloody WEEKS!

KWIL08/03/2017 21:44:30
3549 forum posts
70 photos

Another reason to wear gloves when welding, keeps them clear of the ultra violet and infra red rays as well.

On a Harrison lathe I think you used to be able to order with the carriage handwheel on the side you wanted.

Robbo08/03/2017 22:17:45
1504 forum posts
142 photos

Because they expect the swarf to come off in a long string, not a bird's nest! smile

Viz :

boxford pic001 (small).jpg

John Stevenson08/03/2017 22:43:02
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Posted by Phil Whitley on 08/03/2017 21:19:20:

The Colchesters, and I believe, some others have the handwheel on the left on straight bed machines, and on the right on gap bed models,

.

That is because when the gap is out you also loose part of the rack bolted to the gap so a left hand handwheel runs out of travel.

It did used to be a US / UK thing as the 'mericans don't use gap bed lathes, they just rope off the other top corner of the North 40 and buy a bigger lathe.

However now with a lot of machines being made in China you can often specify right hand or left.

Enough!08/03/2017 23:08:17
1719 forum posts
1 photos

Robbo - Maybe it lets short-sighted operators like that one get closer to the cut.

Edited By Bandersnatch on 08/03/2017 23:08:52

Neil Wyatt10/03/2017 14:40:52
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I'll buy the idea that wheel at left keeps the more critical leadscrew half nuts away from swarf.

Neil

Scrumpy10/03/2017 16:35:17
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151 forum posts

I have to be careful my Harrison L5 handle on left along with my Boxford but my Mitchell is on the right it also disengages so it does not turn possible as its a full wheel some 12 ins in dia

Willliam Powell10/03/2017 19:04:32
19 forum posts
18 photos

Yep, it's awful.

I have had the pleasure of running a Monarch DS&G several years back, and aside from having to acquire new reflexes, it was a delight. No burning bits landing on my left hand....

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