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Tap wrenches

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Benny Avelin23/02/2017 10:18:35
80 forum posts
86 photos

I have long tried to find nice tap-wrenches at flea markets, but have come short on the small sizes. I decided therefore to build one, well actually two, since one is for my father.

So far I have made the adjustment nut.

Adjustment nut

Andrew Johnston23/02/2017 10:43:22
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4893 forum posts
552 photos

Pretty darn neat knurling. thumbs up

Andrew

mechman4823/02/2017 12:25:59
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2505 forum posts
374 photos

Neat knurling Benny; did you use scissor type tool or push on style ?

​George.

Benny Avelin23/02/2017 12:58:25
80 forum posts
86 photos

Thanks for the nice comments, I am quite happy with the knurling. Knurling has been fairly simple since I built my clamp style knurling tool. I also put some build images in an album.

img_2801.jpg

Tonight I will start on the body of the tap-wrench.

Edited By Benny Avelin on 23/02/2017 12:59:13

Benny Avelin23/02/2017 16:15:21
80 forum posts
86 photos

Before dinner progress.

img_2916.jpg

Benny Avelin23/02/2017 19:23:30
80 forum posts
86 photos

This is where I am finishing for today. Not so much turning left, next I will be milling the center part and the hole for the tap.

img_2917.jpg

Ian S C24/02/2017 11:25:34
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7447 forum posts
230 photos

A tap wrench is a ideal tool to make for someone starting out in any sort of lathe work, it's not too taxing on dimensions, but it will out last you in the workshop.

Ian S C

Benny Avelin24/02/2017 19:47:12
80 forum posts
86 photos

Hopefully they will last me a long time, regarding dimensions, I really need to get better with dimensions of length on the lathe, the diameter is fairly easy to hit.

Benny Avelin24/02/2017 19:53:17
80 forum posts
86 photos

This is the drawing I am using, but for some reason not following very well.

img_2918.jpg

img_2919.jpg

img_2920.jpg

img_2922.jpg

This is the setup I was using for support when drilling the center hole, worked well. I like my starrett adjustable parallel.

img_2923.jpg

img_2924.jpg

Vic24/02/2017 22:30:52
2306 forum posts
12 photos

They're coming along nicely. wink

vintagengineer24/02/2017 22:35:34
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468 forum posts
6 photos

I was taught hatched knurling was for knobs that needed pulling and straight knurling was for knobs that need twisting.But straight knurling seems to have gone out of fashion.

Ian S C25/02/2017 07:49:36
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7447 forum posts
230 photos

Milling the flat part on a tap wrench(first milling job on my new mill)was where I learned that you DON"T use a Jacobs drill chuck for milling, the chuck fell out of the #3 MT taper, oh dear, the tap wrench has the nick out of it to remind me every time I use it.

Ian S C

Benny Avelin25/02/2017 08:22:49
80 forum posts
86 photos

Regarding diamond pattern or straight, I agree completely that straight is for knobs that need turning since they won't be that good for pulling wink On a serious note I would consider the pattern for a rotating knob to be cosmetical as you can choose either one or the other. However maybe you have some knob that you don't taunt to get pulled then straight would be a better choice. I chose diamond knurling for two reasons, one is that I don't have any straight wheels here as I have left them at my fathers place, second I don't want to drop this tool with oily hands. smiley

Anywho I always refer to this document when designing a part to check how much torque I can apply,

**LINK**

Here is some more great information about knurling and computing diameters and such.

**LINK**

Ian, I would have loved to do this project long ago, but I have gotten by on newly manufactured cheap tap wrenches and at some point I got fed up with the quality and decided to look for vintage tooling, when that failed I decided to make my own. I have also designed a bigger version with movable jaws that I will start making fairly soon.

fishy-steve25/02/2017 08:25:51
121 forum posts
30 photos

Hi Benny,

They look very nice.

I have a few tap wrenches to this design that I have acquired and they all have the same annoying problem. The pin that acts on the tap stems have all burred up. This isn't a problem when using smaller taps. The problem arises when you try to use it on taps that are at the maximum size for the tool. The burrs stop the pin retracting into the handle. At this point I usually throw the tool down in disgust and have to rummage around for a bigger tap wrench.

As you will own the tool from new you might not have the same problem. The guy that owned mine before I acquired them must have been an ape. 😉

You could make the 4mm pin out of silver steel and harden the tip. Just a thought.

Steve.

Benny Avelin25/02/2017 08:26:00
80 forum posts
86 photos

Ian I remember a long time ago when I also tried to mill with a Jacobs chuck, but in a drill press disgust

I was a kid back then and it was my fathers drill press, thank god he is a forgiving man.

roy entwistle25/02/2017 09:05:29
1049 forum posts

I had to use a file when I made mine but then I was an apprentice @ 1950

Roy

Nicholas Farr26/02/2017 07:51:54
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1992 forum posts
950 photos

Hi Benny, nice work on your tap wrenches. On the question of whether the knurling should be straight or not, I can't say that I've seen any tap wrenches with straight knurling, all the ones that I have are diamond pattern, including this one below.

tap wrench.jpg

This is No. 111 in the 1949 Moore & wright catalogue, it is about 5" long and can accommodate up to 3/8" taps.

Regards Nick.

Michael Gilligan26/02/2017 08:48:11
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14135 forum posts
615 photos
Posted by Benny Avelin on 25/02/2017 08:22:49:

Anywho I always refer to this document when designing a part to check how much torque I can apply,

**LINK**

Here is some more great information about knurling and computing diameters and such.

**LINK**

.

Useful links. Benny

Thank You

MichaelG.

Benny Avelin26/02/2017 09:49:51
80 forum posts
86 photos
Posted by roy entwistle on 25/02/2017 09:05:29:

I had to use a file when I made mine but then I was an apprentice @ 1950

Roy

I would have loved to be an apprentice and learn how to file. Since I started this hobby on my own I did not start with filing since it seemed boring, however I constantly curse my crappy filing skills, which gets better and better but I should really force myself to file for a month or so.

In fact I really love old school machining and do not really like carbide tooling, I see the benefit from I time perspective but the slow cutting speeds with sharp tools and cutting oil and the silent cutting action is like music to my ears and candy to my eyes. Once I get more space I will immediately get a shaper and a horizontal mill, beautiful machines...

Benny Avelin26/02/2017 09:53:22
80 forum posts
86 photos
Posted by Nicholas Farr on 26/02/2017 07:51:54:

Hi Benny, nice work on your tap wrenches. On the question of whether the knurling should be straight or not, I can't say that I've seen any tap wrenches with straight knurling, all the ones that I have are diamond pattern, including this one below.

This is No. 111 in the 1949 Moore & wright catalogue, it is about 5" long and can accommodate up to 3/8" taps.

Regards Nick.

Pictures like this is the inspiration for my tool (obviously), isn't it beautiful?

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