By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Forum House Ad Zone

Replacing Flourescent Tubes with LED tubes

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
petro1head21/02/2017 21:23:45
avatar
770 forum posts
152 photos

I currently have 3 x 5' and 1 x 4' fluorescent lights in my workshop but I find its not bright enough.

Would getting replacement LED tubes help and am I better getting 4250K or 6000K

 

Edit: been having read and from what I can see LED will not be as bright

Edited By petro1head on 21/02/2017 21:46:11

Toby21/02/2017 22:03:17
117 forum posts
17 photos
Posted by petro1head on 21/02/2017 21:23:45:

Edit: been having read and from what I can see LED will not be as bright

Edited By petro1head on 21/02/2017 21:46:11

Correct, generally the fluorescent are brighter for the same size tube although LED is getting better all the time.. Are your walls and ceiling painted white? If not, doing that will double how bright it looks.

Depending on how old they are just replacing the tubes might also improve things, apart from that changing them for doubles or fitting more would be the way to go.

Geoff Theasby21/02/2017 22:34:42
613 forum posts
17 photos

I'm replacing fluorescent tubes with strips of LEDs from a reel. If they aren't bright enough stick up some more!

Geoff

petro1head21/02/2017 22:52:30
avatar
770 forum posts
152 photos

Toby your on my wavelength


Its a wood hut so the walls are brown however I would rather not paint if a have to. My reason being that it will always look grubby


I have ordered some new bulbs and a double fitting

JohnF21/02/2017 23:01:06
avatar
1152 forum posts
190 photos

We are currently fitting out a new shop to move our business to and all lighting is LED, believe me they are bright, brighter than fluorescent and I understand do not lose brightness over time as do fluorescent . We have fitted out the sales area, offices and workshop all with LED.

I don't have the spec to hand but will have a look tomorrow and post the spec on here.

John

John Haine21/02/2017 23:02:55
4679 forum posts
273 photos

See this thread

**LINK**

I replaced 15 4ft fluorescents with led equivalents from Ledkia, considerably brighter, quieter, instant, use less energy.

Maurice21/02/2017 23:13:34
469 forum posts
50 photos

I fitted a 5' LED batten light in a garage workshop for someone recently. Very bright; much better than the equivalent fluorescent tube. If the diffuser is removed, the individual LED elements are about the size of an old postage stamp, and almost too bright to look at at close range. On the other hand, I have just put 5 meters of stick-on led tape under a kitchen cabinet, and it is not as bright as the fluorescent tube that I took down. Much smaller area of course. I intend to replace the lights in my workshop with LED as soon as I can.

Maurice

"Bill Hancox"22/02/2017 01:58:14
avatar
257 forum posts
77 photos

I replaced all the bulbs in the house with LED equiv. I now have beautiful bright light throughout the house. I replaced the tubes in one older 4' fluorescent fixture in my shop with 2 Phillips LED drop in tubes ($17 each). These require a magnetic ballast which to the best of my knowledge are no longer manufactured in North America. I believe they have been replaced by electronic ballasts. I replaced the 4' fixture over my workbench with a 4' integral LED fixture ($150). The light is magnificent. I no longer have to turn on additional lamps to see the work at hand. I also replaced the lamps on my lathe, drill press and bench grinder with LED bulbs. It will be interesting to see this month's electric bill.

Toby22/02/2017 08:49:03
117 forum posts
17 photos

I have to admit I thought the only way of getting decent LED light was to replace the whole fitting rather than just using a retrofit LED tube. From the comments above though it sounds like they have improved a lot and I am behind the times!

Having said that, the specs don't back up the views above.

eg a Ledkia 5ft tube here**LINK**

is 2200 lumen.

A standard flozzy tube is about 5500 lumen.

Which is about what I would expect as the LED is only 22W vs the flozzy at 58W and the efficiency of LED is not that different to fluorescent. (certainly not twice as good)

EDIT: according to wikipedia a T8 fluorescent tube is about 80lm/W efficiency, leds are up to about 100 to 130lm/W now so, while LEDs are noticeably more efficient you would still need around the same power input to give a significant light output. And that is the trouble with LEDs they don't like power as they get hot and fail, hence there fact that overall the struggle to match fuorescent.

The story is slightly difference with CFL incandescent replacements, theses small, coiled, tubes are not very efficient so it is possible to get like for like LEDs that are as good if not better.

In my house all bayonet and edison screw bulbs (and GU10 spots) are now LED but any tubes are still fluorescent. If I was to replace the fitting though I would go with LED as long as cost and style were not issues. 

Edited By Toby on 22/02/2017 09:11:09

Geoff Theasby22/02/2017 09:38:34
613 forum posts
17 photos

The advantage of LEDs is that they run cool and last much longer. It helps if they are low voltage types, fed from a transformer, rather than mains powered ones. CFLs also last a long time, some of my domestic lights have lasted 10 years w/o replacement. Individual mains bulbs, esp. in a multi-branch fitting have a worse record. BTW, CFLs are not incandescent. There is no hot, glowing filament giving off light, but an electric discharge in the gas within.

Geoff

John Haine22/02/2017 09:58:09
4679 forum posts
273 photos

All I can say is that having replaced the "flozzys" with LED tubes, they are significantly brighter. This may be because our luminaires were all the cheapest available, but I doubt it.

Gordon Tarling22/02/2017 10:25:47
181 forum posts
4 photos

I am slowly replacing the HF fluorescents in my workshop with LED tubes by converting the existing fittings. Although the spec of the LED tubes shows a lower lumen output than the fluorescents, I find that the LEDs actually seem brighter and give a little more light. This is probably down to the fact that the LED tubes only radiate their light downward, whilst fluorescents radiate in 360 degrees. My advise would be to check lumen outputs of the tubes you're considering very carefully. then try just one and see what you think. BTW, the tubes I'm using are Ledlite 5ft, 24W Cool White, 4000k, 3230 lumens.

Edited By Gordon Tarling 1 on 22/02/2017 10:29:21

Toby22/02/2017 11:08:55
117 forum posts
17 photos
Posted by Gordon Tarling 1 on 22/02/2017 10:25:47:

I am slowly replacing the HF fluorescents in my workshop with LED tubes by converting the existing fittings. Although the spec of the LED tubes shows a lower lumen output than the fluorescents, I find that the LEDs actually seem brighter and give a little more light. This is probably down to the fact that the LED tubes only radiate their light downward, whilst fluorescents radiate in 360 degrees. My advise would be to check lumen outputs of the tubes you're considering very carefully. then try just one and see what you think. BTW, the tubes I'm using are Ledlite 5ft, 24W Cool White, 4000k, 3230 lumens.

Edited By Gordon Tarling 1 on 22/02/2017 10:29:21

excellent advice and I agree, things like whether the fittings have reflectors make a big difference to fluorescent (hence me suggesting painting the ceiling white.......).

Howard Lewis22/02/2017 13:27:45
6116 forum posts
14 photos

As soon as my shop build was completed was to paint the wooden walls above the benches, and the ceiling, with white emulsion, followed by gloss white. Usually the one 5' Fluorescent suffices, but a second is available when more light is wanted at one end (Barely 10'6" long anyway, but the ceiling slopes from 8' down to 7'6".

LED lamps in the mains BC and ES worklights, and 24V 50W Halogen on the lathe, with a LED strip on the inside of the beam above the lathe.

If I wasn't so mean, I'd change the Fluorescents to LED, believing that it would be brighter and higher colour temperature. Maybe the capital outlay would be offset by the saving in electricity?

What are your experiences?

Howard

Richard S222/02/2017 13:58:40
avatar
230 forum posts
137 photos
Posted by Howard Lewis on 22/02/2017 13:27:45:

As soon as my shop build was completed was to paint the wooden walls above the benches, and the ceiling, with white emulsion, followed by gloss white. Usually the one 5' Fluorescent suffices, but a second is available when more light is wanted at one end (Barely 10'6" long anyway, but the ceiling slopes from 8' down to 7'6".

LED lamps in the mains BC and ES worklights, and 24V 50W Halogen on the lathe, with a LED strip on the inside of the beam above the lathe.

If I wasn't so mean, I'd change the Fluorescents to LED, believing that it would be brighter and higher colour temperature. Maybe the capital outlay would be offset by the saving in electricity?

What are your experiences?. Howard

I'm pleased to see a mention of the need to paint surfaces to reflect the available light where possible, it really does make a difference. I'm also mean with energy consumption and not necessarily make efficient use of it.

I only have a single 4ft Fluorescent 36w over the Lathe and individual Super Bright LED adjustable Lamps on the Mill and smaller Lathe which are more than effective.

I will eventually however convert to LED and add extra Tubes when I've repainted the W/shop walls and ceiling, then modified the workbench etc.

Regards

Muzzer22/02/2017 16:33:32
avatar
2904 forum posts
448 photos

As noted in the previous thread on LED vs fluorescent lighting, the light output vs power consumption is actually very similar. So you will wait many years before the electricity pays off the cost of the change. However, before then you will have recouped your costs on account of the fact that fluorescent tubes have a more limited life and need to be replaced periodically. It's more the hassle of doing it that justifies LED lamps - fit and forget, unless you cheap out on ebay / pound shop specials.

Martin 10022/02/2017 17:11:32
274 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by JohnF on 21/02/2017 23:01:06:

We are currently fitting out a new shop to move our business to and all lighting is LED, believe me they are bright, brighter than fluorescent and I understand do not lose brightness over time as do fluorescent

Then you believe incorrectly

Philips Lighting UK Why is the life of LEDs measured as lumen depreciation?

Unlike conventional light sources that reduce in output and eventually fail, LED products do not normally suddenly fail. Instead, the light output reduces over time.

The normal convention is to quote the life when the output has reduced by 30%. I.e. when there is 70% light output remaining. This is often quoted as the L70 life and is measured in hours.

Philips Technology White Paper - Understanding power LED lifetime analysis

Typical datasheet for a 6ft tube showing 50000 hours to 70% light output

**LINK**

Vic22/02/2017 17:41:13
3074 forum posts
8 photos

Is it me or do LED lights not last anywhere near as long as they're supposed to? I've heard lots of comments about this and certainly the ones I've had haven't lasted anywhere near the claimed amount.

We had an 8 foot fluorescent tube last 18 years at one of my old jobs. They don't make them like that anymore!

Toby22/02/2017 18:07:15
117 forum posts
17 photos

I reckon most here will have tubes that are over 10 years old but we think they are "fairly new".

In reality they will have degraded and not be giving out anywhere near the light they used to. Coupled with dirty covers, no reflectors and gray ceilings (and, dare I say it, failing eyesight....) we decide they are no good.

In 10 years time we will all be complaining that these "new" LED lights are not all they were cracked up to be when fitted and be looking for something that is better.

Don't get me wrong, if fitting new lights I would seriously consider LED but if it is just improving an old setup then perhaps a good clean, a new tube at about £2 and a fresh coat of paint on the ceiling might just do it?

Which reminds me, my workshop lighting is very dingy, perhaps I need to put my money where my mouth is

Edited By Toby on 22/02/2017 18:07:48

Muzzer22/02/2017 19:08:30
avatar
2904 forum posts
448 photos

There aren't many light sources that don't age and lose output. To be reasonably objective about this you'd need to compare them against similar criteria.

This is a pretty interesting and technically respectable looking paper that compares the various light technologies. Contains mostly facts rather than opinions.

Murray

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
Eccentric July 5 2018
cowells
Rapid RC
Eccentric Engineering
Dreweatts
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest