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Boxford

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Scrumpy04/01/2017 20:26:20
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151 forum posts

i have been given a Boxford Cud lathe we think it comes fully fitted with lots af extras it has been stored for some 10 years on trying it works quite well except the travice will not work either cross or longitude you can close the nut for screw cutting the lead screw works both ways but no travice has anyone any idea what this could be and how I can fix it . I would like to change the belt but it looks like a major strip down is this so any help appreciated

Brian H04/01/2017 20:33:23
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2312 forum posts
112 photos

If the belt is a continuous one then I would cut it off and get a segmented one from here; http://www.lathes.co.uk/boxford/index.html.

This site also has spares, accessories and handbooks as well as the 'T' belt that means you don't have to dismantle anything.

Bazyle04/01/2017 20:55:15
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6379 forum posts
222 photos

A CUD doesn't have cross feed. That's on a BUD. The CUD uses the screwcutting feed for longitudinal traverse. However you might have a BUD anyway otherwise it would be obvious there is no separate feed arrangement.
If you have a 'star' wheel and a lever with a detent on the front of the apron in addition to the half nut engagement then it is a BUD.

Feed is engaged by moving the lever up or down (it interlocks with the screwcutting halfnut lever to prevent dual operation) One is for longitudinal and one is crosswise. But you also have to gently do up the star nut to engage the clutch.

DO NOT rely on the clutch to stop the saddle as it might stick and note if you ever try to strip the apron the screw in the middle of the star wheel is LEFT HAND.

not done it yet04/01/2017 21:02:18
6878 forum posts
20 photos

It seems like you need to look under its apron? Could be non-engagement or something broken. Looks a fairly simple arrangement. Whatever it is, it looks like removal of the apron will be needed to fix it - unless it is the pin holding the selector handle (onto the shaft) that has broken.

Speedy Builder504/01/2017 21:30:36
2644 forum posts
218 photos

Same as Bazyl, disengage the screw cutting half nuts. Select longitudinal feed by moving the select lever upwards. Tighten the star screw tightly clockwise to engage the feed. If the feed doesn't work, strip the saddle down. It may be that the key that slides along the lead screw groove has broken / missing. Take heed to Bazyls warning about the star wheel screw . It is LH thread. Ie screw it in clockwise to remove the screw.
Sorry to repeat Bazyles post, but he is on the money.
BobH

Bob Brown 104/01/2017 22:19:02
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1021 forum posts
127 photos

AUD gear box and auto feed to saddle and cross slide, BUD as AUD less gear box, CUD as BUD less auto feed to saddle and cross slide. If there are not two levers and a star clutch on the saddle it's a CUD.

Mark C04/01/2017 22:48:48
707 forum posts
1 photos

You might want to join up here **LINK** at the Boxford group. You will get a LOT of dedicated Boxford help there.

Mark

Marcus Bowman04/01/2017 23:00:18
180 forum posts

I second Brian Hutchings earlier reply re: belt. I have an AUD with the underdrive (motor in the cabinet), and I renewed the belt years ago. Cut it off, then fit a T-belt. The links are easy to assemble, and it can all be done without dismantling anything. Take care when oiling the backgear reservoir. Over-enthusiastic oiling with attendant spillage will shed oil onto the belt and it will slip. Other than that, I have had 20 years out of the current belt, and it looks as good as new.

You might also want to squeeze a rag into the gap at the headstock end of the bed, between the vee and the sheet metal cover at the rear of the headstock. Oil or coolant will run along the bed, and through that gap, then drip down onto the belt. My last rag lasted about 15 years, before I changed it.

Marcus

Scrumpy05/01/2017 18:18:20
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151 forum posts

Many thanks for all the replays on the post but After visiting my mate to view the Boxford lathe again and checking on the saddle there is a lever for screw cutting a lever with 3 indents along with a star nut this nut you can pull it out when the lever with the indents is in the correct position can I assume this to be a bud lathe sadly the traverse does not work so it looks like it needs to be stripped any suggestions on how to tackle this strip down the lathe apart from this problem is in very good condition and free for taking away but there is always a catch

I was going to buy a new Warco lathe but this lathe is a far far better propessition so the money will be put to a DRO any help on this is appreciated

Ajohnw05/01/2017 18:47:58
3631 forum posts
160 photos
Posted by Scrumpy on 05/01/2017 18:18:20:

Many thanks for all the replays on the post but After visiting my mate to view the Boxford lathe again and checking on the saddle there is a lever for screw cutting a lever with 3 indents along with a star nut this nut you can pull it out when the lever with the indents is in the correct position can I assume this to be a bud lathe sadly the traverse does not work so it looks like it needs to be stripped any suggestions on how to tackle this strip down the lathe apart from this problem is in very good condition and free for taking away but there is always a catch

I was going to buy a new Warco lathe but this lathe is a far far better propessition so the money will be put to a DRO any help on this is appreciated

Have you tried tightening the black star shaped knob sticking out of the apron ?

It needs to be screwed tighter until you get a reliable feed. It's a slip clutch so that the saddle can be run directly onto a bed stop. Something I regularly do. It needs to be set tight enough to take a cut. To check slacken it right off (unscrew) and see if the saddle feeds along. It probably wont. Try a bit more tension. It might move a bit and stop etc, You might be able to stop it with your hand when it's very lightly set. When you actually come to turning just tighten it up more until it feeds reliably.

The 3 position lever suggests that it has both feeds. Both disengaged in the middle and saddle feed when it's in the top position. Hope I have that right. I hardly ever touch mine and it's currently in the top position for saddle feed which is all I use. This is an ME10 but as far as I am aware all are the same when the feeds are fitted.

You can find the parts diagrams on the yahoo group - very useful if you actually do need to strip it down. I'd suspect it's just lack of use and a loose clutch setting.

Oh - don't try a bed stop when it's screw cutting - it would be a disaster.

John

-

Edited By Ajohnw on 05/01/2017 18:49:04

Bazyle05/01/2017 18:50:27
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6379 forum posts
222 photos

Does the leadscrew have a keyway all down the length? If not it may be a CUD with a BUD apron intending a conversion.

If the 3 position lever is put up or down not he middle neutral position the star wheel should turn when the leadscrew is turned. If not there is something up with the initial gears or the key that picks up the drive to the worm. The worm slides along the leadscrew and engages a brass wormwheel which might have been damaged n a crash.

If the star wheel is turning as above the problem is with the clutch which is a bit of an odd design and can fall apart if someone messes around and undoes the starwheel retaining screw then undoes the wheel letting the shaft move in too far. This can look like it is repaired by putting the star back on but the internals have fallen apart.

When removing the apron put a plank on the bed, prop up the underside of the apron with several small wood sheets, then undo the screws. You can then slide out the sheets progressively dropping the apron. This applies to most lathes and is more significant for bigger ones where you can't hold the weight in one hand while undoing the screws with the other but good practice.

One of the socket end grub screws is a lock for a second one deeper down the hole. Make sure you use genuine imperial unworn allen keys to avoid rounding the sockets.

MalcB05/01/2017 19:13:03
257 forum posts
35 photos

You need to download or Purchase a copy of "Know Your Lathe" its a great book dedicated to the earlier Boxfords.

As mentioned, joining Yahoo Boxford User Group is a great asset too. Plenty of very useful downloads to get a grip with.

Mark C05/01/2017 19:18:36
707 forum posts
1 photos

If the feed clutch is in good order (and has the plastic black star wheel - the newer type that does not turn when the saddle moves) you will break things with it as it is NOT a slipping clutch. There are two different types!!!

Mark

Toby05/01/2017 19:30:25
117 forum posts
17 photos

I don't know if it will help but there are some good pictures of the back of an apron here.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/1947-model-9a-128005/index2.html

I know that thread is for a southbend but there are only very minor differences between those pics and ones I have of my AUD.

Bob Brown 105/01/2017 19:40:57
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1021 forum posts
127 photos

box1.jpg

Mark C05/01/2017 19:51:13
707 forum posts
1 photos

Bob, that is the old type - that will slip, the new design may not, especially if you tighten it up!

Mark

Bob Brown 105/01/2017 20:20:00
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1021 forum posts
127 photos

Mines a late metric AUD and unless you go mad it will slip

Mark C05/01/2017 20:47:58
707 forum posts
1 photos

Bob, I have both types and the early one needs to be tight or it will slip. If you tighten the later one as much it will not slip - or mine doesn't at any rate. I use a stop on mine and the first time I used it on the VSL (same as yours but with bigger spindle) it pushed the thing down the bed, which would have been a disaster if I was not watching at the time!

Mark

Martin 10005/01/2017 21:21:25
275 forum posts
6 photos

It's been a good few years since I rebuilt the apron on my Boxford but I seem to recall there was some degree of adjustment available on the clutch with a screw or a nut - mine is the earlier model with the rotating metal handwheel.

Scrumpy06/01/2017 12:16:43
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151 forum posts

Hi all thanks for the information so far but on bringing the lathe home and into the workshop I was able to spend more time looking it over (1) the lead screw has a key way the full length so can I assume it a Bud (2) the star wheel does not turn when you move the sadle so I think is a strip down (3) does the star wheel have a locking screw fitted in the end as you can unscrew it and remove (4) can spare parts be purchased or would I be better to leave it as it is first impressions it looks to be a very good lathe Derek

Good to see the Devon flag used

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