By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Oct 22nd

Original Myford raiser block queries

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
choochoo_baloo27/12/2016 15:04:17
avatar
197 forum posts
36 photos

Hello all,

Having taken the (original I think) Myford raiser blocks off my ML7 with Myford cabinet stand, I want to check a few things:

Compared with the main lathe, the paint work is flaking and generally poorly applied. Also the levelling nuts were painted in...will repaint anyway, but want to gauge whether experienced Myford owners agree this was a home bodge?

See first photo, the studs (with levelling nuts out), wont budge. Curious to know, how and why are these fixed to the block? Slightly concerned that there wont he enough thread protruding to fit the final nut on the bed.

Want to fit coolant pump in due course. Will these O rings be up to the job of sealing the tray to stop it leaking through? They're slightly proud of the bottom face of the block.

Can someone recommend a *quality* Myford grey paint (having found a few online) - mins a 1950s made ML7.

Thanks in advance.

 

 

Edited By choochoo_baloo on 27/12/2016 15:05:31

NJH27/12/2016 15:17:31
avatar
2314 forum posts
139 photos

 

Try www.paragonpaints.co.uk

They list "Original Myford Grey Paint"

( I can't vouch for it personally - mine is green and, thankfully, does not need paint - yet!)

Norman

Edited By NJH on 27/12/2016 15:20:22

Curtis Rutter27/12/2016 16:08:52
127 forum posts
13 photos

Can't see any photo's?

Trevor Drabble27/12/2016 16:20:49
avatar
204 forum posts
5 photos

Stokes Paints in Sheffield ( 0114 258 9595 ) used to produce very good machine enamel in small quantities to your choice of colour . No connection to company other than very satisfied passed customer .

Trevor .

Mike Crossfield27/12/2016 18:09:39
193 forum posts
17 photos

No photos showing, so can't help re. raising blocks.

A paint which I can highly recommend is Tractol enamel. Very tough and oil resistant. High solids content so covers well, and slow drying, so even if you brush apply the finish is good. You can usually source it on line from flea bay, or from suppliers like Smith&Allen (who incidentally are also the cheapest supplier I've found for Myford spindle and slideway oils). Agricultural suppliers often stock it as well.Ferguson Grey is a very close match to the grey used on older Myford.

Mike

choochoo_baloo28/12/2016 16:04:05
avatar
197 forum posts
36 photos

Woops, attached are the block photos. Advise as per my original post would be much appreciated.

Block1.jpeg

Block3.jpeg

Block2.jpeg

Edited By choochoo_baloo on 28/12/2016 16:06:33

Michael Gilligan28/12/2016 16:38:03
avatar
14159 forum posts
618 photos

They look like the real thing; but rather badly re-painted [probably with a chemically incompatible paint].

The O-rings, or suitable replacements, should seal O.K. if the mating surfaces are clean and reasonably flat.

Sorry ... I haven't got any on mine sad so can't help more than that.

MichaelG.

.

Edit: Rather strangely; they don't look like the new [improved?] ones currently being sold by 'Myford' ... I guess the change of style doesn't make much difference, because it's the Levelling Screws that provide the contact patch.

http://www.myford.co.uk/cgi-bin/sh000002.pl?WD=blocks%20raising&PN=RAISING%2dBLOCKS%2d%2d20%2d025%2d651%2ehtml#SID=204

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 28/12/2016 17:04:20

Robbo28/12/2016 17:43:34
1504 forum posts
142 photos

That's an original Myford raiser, but there don't seem to be any levelling screws. The bolts you can see pass through the levelling screws which are threaded into the block ( 9/16" BSF if memory serves). The hex head of the levelling screw should be visible above the surface of the block, and the lathe foot rests on the top of the levelling screw.

The rubber rings ( known as "Dinky Toy tyres" in the spares counter of old) should be OK if they still protrude from the block, but you can always run some liquid gasket round the base to be sure of a seal

Edited By Robbo on 28/12/2016 17:48:28

Michael Gilligan28/12/2016 17:52:22
avatar
14159 forum posts
618 photos
Posted by Robbo on 28/12/2016 17:43:34:

That's an original Myford raiser, but there don't seem to be any raising bolts. The bolts you can see pass through the raising bolts which are threaded into the block ( 9/16" BSF if memory serves). The hex head of the raising bolt should be visible above the surface of the block.

.

The "raising bolts" currently known as "Levelling Screws" are illustrated on the Myford page that I linked.

MichaelG.

.

Edit: just realised what the OP meant by "See first photo, the studs (with levelling nuts out), wont budge"

... that's three names we are using for the same item.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 28/12/2016 17:59:59

David Standing 128/12/2016 18:24:30
1280 forum posts
46 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 28/12/2016 17:52:22:
Posted by Robbo on 28/12/2016 17:43:34:

That's an original Myford raiser, but there don't seem to be any raising bolts. The bolts you can see pass through the raising bolts which are threaded into the block ( 9/16" BSF if memory serves). The hex head of the raising bolt should be visible above the surface of the block.

.

The "raising bolts" currently known as "Levelling Screws" are illustrated on the Myford page that I linked.

MichaelG.

.

Edit: just realised what the OP meant by "See first photo, the studs (with levelling nuts out), wont budge"

... that's three names we are using for the same item.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 28/12/2016 17:59:59

I'll take your three names...........and raise you another wink 2.

In the original Myford installation and operating manual, Myford refer to these as 'jackscrews' laugh.

Michael Gilligan28/12/2016 18:31:05
avatar
14159 forum posts
618 photos
Posted by David Standing 1 on 28/12/2016 18:24:30:

I'll take your three names...........and raise you another wink 2.

In the original Myford installation and operating manual, Myford refer to these as 'jackscrews' laugh.

.

... and to think; Neil was hoping to create a 'Dictionary' surprise

MichaelG.

David Standing 128/12/2016 19:08:21
1280 forum posts
46 photos

And to the OP, the studs should be a loose sliding fit in the raiser blocks/jackscrews.

Yours are probably locked in by crud and paint. Use the stud nuts, fit two together on each stud and lock them together, and you should be able to break the seal and get the studs out by twisting the nuts/studs with a spanner.

When you refit them, here's a dodge to make the process, and that of levelling, MUCH easier.

Source four extra 5/16 BSF nuts, even better if you can get half nuts.

Fit the jackscrews to the raiser blocks, and screw them in to the raiser blocks fully, then unscrew them around 2 to 3mm each, no more. Ideally then check the total height of each raiser block and jackscrew with a digital caliper, and make them all the same.

Fit one (half) nut to the (longer) threaded end of the studs, and screw it right to the end of the thread - loose, NOT locked. Drop this through the jackscrew and raiser block, and through the tray and stand. Loose fit the whole assembly with a nut under the stand.

Repeat with all four, and you should have four studs protruding from the blocks, that you can lower the lathe on to.

If you don't fit the extra nut, you have a lot of faffing trying to locate the holes in the stand/tray/raiser block/lathe bed, whereas if you do fit the extra nut, the lathe drops straight on to the protruding studs.

There should be just enough length in the studs to accommodate the extra nut.

When you start levelling the lathe (following the Myford instructions), nip the two top nuts (either side of the lathe bed) up against each other, and make sure the nut under the inside of the stand is left loose, until you have finished levelling, then nip those up last.

The other advantage with this method is that it gives you a bit more space in the gap between the raiser block and lathe bed to get the jackscrew adjusting spanner in when you are adjusting the jackscrews.

David Standing 128/12/2016 19:09:04
1280 forum posts
46 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 28/12/2016 18:31:05:
Posted by David Standing 1 on 28/12/2016 18:24:30:

I'll take your three names...........and raise you another wink 2.

In the original Myford installation and operating manual, Myford refer to these as 'jackscrews' laugh.

.

... and to think; Neil was hoping to create a 'Dictionary' surprise

MichaelG.

Not if we have anything to do with it wink 2.

choochoo_baloo28/12/2016 21:38:35
avatar
197 forum posts
36 photos

Thanks for the replies chaps. Will take my time and read them thoroughly once back in the workshop.

Yes to be explicit, I managed to (after some spanner with elbow grease) remove the four levelling bolts which had been painted in! Here's the photo of the new ones that were linked by Michael:

screen shot 2016-12-28 at 21.33.16.jpeg

Edited By choochoo_baloo on 28/12/2016 21:38:53

AJW28/12/2016 21:43:29
avatar
275 forum posts
117 photos
I have for years had my 50's Myford mounted on studs which come up through the cabinet and into the lathe feet. Very easy to level and never found any problems with it and I have a motorised VMC mounted on the back of the bed!

Alan
choochoo_baloo29/12/2016 19:07:28
avatar
197 forum posts
36 photos

Does anyone know how the studs are held in the blocks? Also are the O rings just a push fit in the recesses?

Ideally want to remove the former, and definitely remove the latter, for stripping and re-painting the blocks.

Robbo29/12/2016 19:20:48
1504 forum posts
142 photos

The levelling screws are threaded 9/16 BSF if you want to clean up their threads. Their thread extends about half the depth of the block.

The long studs are threaded 5/16" BSF through the rest of the hole in the block. When you get them out (using the locking nut method outlined previously by David Standing) you will see that the lower thread on the bolt is longer than the top one.

When fitting blocks to a Myford cabinet it is sometimes necessary to fiddle them up and down the thread in the block to get enough thread at each end.

David Standing 129/12/2016 20:19:27
1280 forum posts
46 photos
Posted by choochoo_baloo on 29/12/2016 19:07:28:

Does anyone know how the studs are held in the blocks? Also are the O rings just a push fit in the recesses?

Ideally want to remove the former, and definitely remove the latter, for stripping and re-painting the blocks.

Wasn't my post of 19:08 yesterday clear? sad.

When I said the studs are a loose sliding fit in the jackscrews/raiser blocks, I meant nothing holds them in, apart from the nuts above them stopping them dropping through. If yours are stuck, it is because paint/crud is stopping them from sliding through by gravity.

And yes, the o rings are just a push fit in the raiser blocks. New ones would also be an interference fit on the studs too.

KWIL29/12/2016 22:52:57
3127 forum posts
57 photos

David,

Robbo is quite correct, the original bolts were or should be part screwed to the block so that you can bolt down the raising block independently of what ever is sitting on the raising blocks. At least the ones I have on an ML7 and Super 7 are. Originally two differing lengths of 5/16" BSF studs were available from (old) Myford.

I have made other raising blocks by preparing round bar to appropriate dimensions, fitting O rings and fitting levelling screws as normal.

David Standing 129/12/2016 23:03:51
1280 forum posts
46 photos
Posted by KWIL on 29/12/2016 22:52:57:

David,

Robbo is quite correct, the original bolts were or should be part screwed to the block so that you can bolt down the raising block independently of what ever is sitting on the raising blocks. At least the ones I have on an ML7 and Super 7 are. Originally two differing lengths of 5/16" BSF studs were available from (old) Myford.

I have made other raising blocks by preparing round bar to appropriate dimensions, fitting O rings and fitting levelling screws as normal.

KWIL

Not trying to be pedantic, but the OP is already confused, and a reference to 'bolts' is likely to cause even more confusion. It has confused me.....

Are you really saying that 'bolts' (as we understand them) were used in conjunction with the raiser blocks in some cases? How would that work then?

Or are you saying studding (threaded end to end, not at each end like most of the raiser block studs you see) was used, and the raiser blocks were threaded internally?

Thanks

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
cowbells
TRANSWAVE Converters
Eccentric July 5 2018
Warco
Eccentric Engineering
Meridienne; London MES
Ausee.com.au
ChesterUK
Allendale Electronics
emcomachinetools
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest