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Last Night's Astro Image

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Geoff Theasby09/01/2017 21:33:41
595 forum posts
15 photos

battle_crawler_medium_420_by_studio_octavio.jpgBoiler,

Digressing, (Great images, Neil) layering in the computer enables images like these.

Geoff

Martin 10010/01/2017 10:49:58
252 forum posts
6 photos

Nice pics and amazing what you can do with a bit of image stacking.

 

I take the easy option, a fresh image every day, no need for a telescope and I get to sleep all night

Astronomy Picture of the Day

 

Edited By Martin 100 on 10/01/2017 10:51:02

Geoff Theasby10/01/2017 11:56:42
595 forum posts
15 photos

Test

Attachment problems

This was a real ship, designed by real Naval Architects. It took to the water, sailed about being military, and nobody laughed!

navy 3.jpg

Geoff Theasby10/01/2017 19:42:59
595 forum posts
15 photos

geoff moon.jpgThis was taken from my garden in 2013, I thought I'd lost it! Lumix FS-35 at maximum zoom.

Geoff

Neil Wyatt02/03/2017 22:59:21
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Wow, it's been TWO MONTHS since I got a gap in the 'permacloud' that I have been able to make use of. Tonight with high hopes of a clear night right through to the small hours I set up, but only got half an hour of pictures before the cloud rolled in sad. The result is a bit noisy, but at least you can tell what it is, the Rosette nebula. Sadly there will be too much moon to get more of this for a few weeks and its rapidly sinking towards the west.

BW04/03/2017 12:01:08
249 forum posts
40 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 04/12/2016 19:27:13:

And last night's image. Started imaging at 12:45 and was up until nearly five...

Hey Neil,

I like that picture.

Is that actually what you see through your eyepiece when you point your telescope at the right place ?

......... and if you cannot see it how do you know where to point the telescope ?

Bill

Neil Wyatt04/03/2017 13:37:41
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Posted by Bill Wood 2 on 04/03/2017 12:01:08:

Is that actually what you see through your eyepiece when you point your telescope at the right place ?

......... and if you cannot see it how do you know where to point the telescope ?

Bill

No, its too faint to see in colour and even with a big scope and a very dark sky the Horsehead is apparently just a faint black scoop out of the nebulosity.

Easy to find as the big star is Alnitak, the left hand star in Orion's belt.

Other targets can be found using 'setting circles' or 'star hopping' but I made a GOTO box, so for the Rosette above I lined the scope up on relatively nearby Betelgeuse then told it to swing to the nebula.

See here for an idea of what you can see with a telescope.

Neil

BW05/03/2017 04:35:21
249 forum posts
40 photos

Thanks Neil - that was puzzling me.

So if your GoTo box was a tiny bit inaccurate or if there is a +/- on the repeatability or the tracking could you spend 5 hours gathering data and have not much to show for it after the data is processed ?

I imagine the horsehead itself would occupy 0.0000x of a second in the field of vision

At the opposite end of the spectrum from yourself, am currently enjoying looking at craters on the moon and struggling to line up on Jupiter unbelievable how I can see things with bare eyes and yet miss them completely with the telescope. I guess I will get better with practice.

Am off to google hints to line up a small telescope.

Bill

Neil Wyatt05/03/2017 09:58:56
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The critical first step is polar alignment, which means making sure the 'right ascension' axis of the mount points exactly at a point above the north pole. This is done (on my setup) by looking through a special finderscope aligned with the axis and placing polaris at the right point (calculated by time and date) on a circular scale (to allow for it being slightly away from the pole).

Once this is done the mount will move (if I have it balanced right) with far more accuracy (the resolution is about 0.75 arc seconds) than I can point it for setting up! Most targets are big (the Rosette nebula is nearly three times the diameter of the moon), the apparent size of the Horsehead is about ten times the size of Jupiter at its biggest.

But yes, if the setup is poorly balanced I can end up with photos of the wrong part of the sky. A few quick test pictures usually confirm all is OK, for faint targets you just check the star pattern.

I suggest downloading the free programme 'Stellarium' which will give you an excellent way to choose targets for observation.

Neil

SillyOldDuffer05/03/2017 16:54:26
5003 forum posts
1061 photos

Ages ago I got interested again and wrote myself an astronomy shopping list. It must have tempted fate because almost every night since has been cloudy. 100% cover as I type this. I haven't seen Polaris for months. Is England the worst place in the world for star-watching?

Dave

Neil Wyatt05/03/2017 20:10:10
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It seems to be generally agreed that this has been one of the worst winters for clear skies in living memory! The jet stream has been south of its usual location bringing endless low pressure and none of those nice big highs that give clear skies.

There were some fair nights in mid January, but caught a virus and didn't want to be out in the cold

Neil

Michael Gilligan22/03/2017 07:38:40
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14601 forum posts
634 photos

For armchair Astronomers/Astronauts: Here's a Flickr archive of NASA images

Currently 1423 pages, but will presumably increase surprise

Page_1 of PhotoStream: **LINK**

Page_1423 of PhotoStream:**LINK**

About: **LINK**

https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/projectapolloarchive/21751523890/

MichaelG.

Neil Wyatt24/03/2017 01:39:11
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The great thing about NASA images is they are all copyright free, even for commercial use!

Another great resource is APOD - awful 190s-style website, but knockout images.

Neil

Ian S C24/03/2017 10:11:34
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7448 forum posts
230 photos

Last night there was an Air New Zealand flight south to view the Aurora Australis, about 150 passengers flew south in a B-767 from Dunedin, mostly Kiwis, but others from USA, Australia, South Africa, and no doubt other places, it cost them $NZ2,000 +, and those interviewed this morning said they would do it again. Thre probably are some photos on line.

Ian S C

Neil Wyatt25/03/2017 22:14:44
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An aurora is something I have always wanted to see.

We have had a few clear nights, this is Markarian's Chain - a chance alignment of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster - that looks like a wing of flying saucers coming in to attack!

I counted 25 galaxies in this picture, there are probably more!

This is the beehive cluster, just an open cluster of very pretty stars in Cancer:

Ian S C26/03/2017 12:10:20
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7448 forum posts
230 photos

The Aurora Australis ca sometimes be seen as far north as Darfield in Canterbury. Saw my first (and best) when I was about 8 yrs old, my bedroom window faced south, and I don't know how many hours I stood at the window watching it, a thing you can never forget.

Ian S C

Roderick Jenkins26/03/2017 13:33:17
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Neil,

I think you're getting the hang of this lark. Very nice.

Rod

Ady124/04/2017 00:46:14
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513 photos

**LINK**

Neil Wyatt24/04/2017 08:38:37
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I thought you had taken that Ady!

I got some pictures of Jupiter with red spot and three of its moons last night, it will take a good while to process them.

Hoping for a clear night tonight, only four hours of 'astro dark' left already.

Neil

Ian S C24/04/2017 11:48:07
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The last few nights the Aurora Australis has been quite bright, and visible as far north as Auckland. No sighting here as it's a bit misty to the south.

Ian S C

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