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Lock making

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Martin Newbold07/07/2016 12:29:39
415 forum posts
240 photos

Sam, Locks are fabulous fun. I was enriched by this through my child hood as my father was in the Guild of Locksmiths and made most of his locks picks and keys for every type of lock possible .

There was always the deepest mystery behind them until you saw all the parts and keys being made and operated . Sadly he is no longer here and you can find an existence of bumping and lock work on youtube which sadly in my opinion should not be there .

Your basic padlock looks good . but to counter picking or bumping of the padlock there is much you need to learn about internals about pins leavers and anti picking devices which are numerous and complex.

Cheers , Martin

Brian John07/07/2016 14:19:00
1452 forum posts
579 photos

If it was that easy to pick a lock then people would never lock themselves out of their houses but they do it all the time. It might look easy to pick a lock on youtube but then, playing the violin looks easy too....until you try it.

Tony Pratt 107/07/2016 18:02:43
887 forum posts
2 photos

This subject has piqued my interest so I have ordered a pick set & practice lock from the Bay, it looks dead easy on the net but I am guessing in reality it will be extremely hard to pick a lock, at the start anyways.

Tony

Mike Poole07/07/2016 18:46:51
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2047 forum posts
47 photos

Tony, you will probably be shocked at how easy a Yale type lock is to pick. This is probably why they are not recommended by police or insurance companies, if I forget my work keys I find it quicker to pick the lock with a paper clip than go home and get the keys.

Mike

Martin Newbold07/07/2016 19:02:21
415 forum posts
240 photos
Posted by Michael Poole on 07/07/2016 18:46:51:

Tony, you will probably be shocked at how easy a Yale type lock is to pick. This is probably why they are not recommended by police or insurance companies, if I forget my work keys I find it quicker to pick the lock with a paper clip than go home and get the keys.

Mike

Depends on the lock type

Sam Longley 107/07/2016 19:02:25
719 forum posts
26 photos

I cannot believe you lot.

All I wanted to know if making locks was a model engineers subject & were there any items on the topic & everyone seems more interested in breaking in.

Are you all a bunch of burglars?

Tony Pratt 107/07/2016 19:33:55
887 forum posts
2 photos

No, but I have had 2 attempted burglaries in the space of a week. They were after my sons MX bike but my layered security stopped them both times.

Just trying to learn more about security & all things mechanicalwink

Tony

Mike Poole07/07/2016 19:36:53
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2047 forum posts
47 photos

Hi Martin, with your background I am sure you know the good locks from the bad but I bet that millions of British front doors would be very vulnerable to easily available equipment and a competent locksmith would open the door very quickly with no damage. Some of the Cowboys have appeared on tv whose first resort is to drill the lock and charge a fortune for replacement, the expert on the program said the lock could be opened easily by a competent locksmith with no damage. The demonstrations on the Internet are something of a double edged sword, it makes you realise that some locks are for privacy type use only but if you want security you will need to spend some serious money on locks and then look at the next vulnerable access points and address them. The downside is that it informs the criminal minded as well but they might know these thing anyway.

Mike

Mike Poole07/07/2016 19:45:53
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2047 forum posts
47 photos

I managed to lock my keys in my car recently and decided to break a small window to reach the keys, in front of a bus queue I repeatedly hit the window until it smashed, no one said a word. One of the motorcycle magazines set up a bike in a busy shopping area and pulled up in a van and loaded bike into it with alarm going off and locks still on, no one said a word.

Mike

KWIL07/07/2016 19:49:05
3111 forum posts
56 photos

You have to remember that with a lock, you are buying time, nothing else. The better the lock, the longer it takes to open.

Great fun.smiley

Bob Stevenson07/07/2016 20:23:15
295 forum posts
6 photos

To return to 'lock-making'.....there are some opportunities for making parts for antique locks and restoration of lock mechanisms genreally. it's quite interesting work being about all the things that 'making type people' (like us!) tend to cherish. i have tackled several over the years and while they can be totally absorbing and very satisfying to achieve they are'nt for the faint hearted or 'dabbler' type of worker.

Antique locks quite often come up for auction and are either in need of some TLC or have bits missing etc. often they have outwitted a previous person and there is a great sense of achievment when the thing works sweetly. I once repaired a Bramah lock where only one side of the lock worked and the local locksmith assured me that "nobody" would "ever be able to repair" the other side thus making entry in both directions possible. After some thought i replaced the missing 'blades' by copying those on the other side using pieces of stainless knife blade and the lock has been extrememely reliable for the last 37 years as it's fitted to my back door! I also changed all 5 locks on my VW slit screen van to one key by removing all the plates, measuring with micrometer and then reconfiguring the locks!.....an interesting and useful little job!

Does anyone remember seeing the Peter Phillips Collection of locks and keys circa 1975? Peter was not only a brilliant restorer but a clever engineer and a talented collector. Does anyone know what became of his fantastic collection including his Roman padlocks,, medieval turret locks, Victorian presentation keys and excellent Bramah items including tiny Bramah key inside gold heart shaped locket...?

Mike Poole07/07/2016 20:44:09
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2047 forum posts
47 photos

Building a one off lock would probably be more secure than a commercial item as no one will know how it works even if standard techniques are used and you will know who has the keys and Timpsons won't have a blank to cut a duplicate.

Mike

Neil Wyatt07/07/2016 20:56:09
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Moderator
16436 forum posts
685 photos
74 articles
Posted by Bob Stevenson on 07/07/2016 20:23:15:

Does anyone remember seeing the Peter Phillips Collection of locks and keys circa 1975? Peter was not only a brilliant restorer but a clever engineer and a talented collector. Does anyone know what became of his fantastic collection including his Roman padlocks,, medieval turret locks, Victorian presentation keys and excellent Bramah items including tiny Bramah key inside gold heart shaped locket...?

That spurred some interesting googling. Bramah worked with Maudslay to produce lock-making equipment.

Sothebys sold the Peter Phillips collection in 2002.

BB2, 1 February 1972:

: Collector's World

This week's subjects include:
Pottery: the fake is as old as art, and in the pottery field the faker has reaped a rich harvest. In Oxford a scientific test now exists which can identify the fake.
A varied assortment of chastity girdles, a unique Renaissance padlock, thumbscrews and felons' leg-irons all have their place in the PETER PHILLIPS collection of locks and keys. Examples of these and many others from his comprehensive collection will be in the studio with Mr Phillips.
JAMES NORBURY answers questions. Introduced by HUGH SCULLY.
Directors ROBIN DRAKE , PAUL SMITH Producer JOHN KING (from Bristol)
(' Hang on to those plaster ducks ': pages 8-9)

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Phillips
Unknown: Mr Phillips.
Introduced By: Hugh Scully.
Directors: Robin Drake
Directors: Paul Smith
Producer: John King

Neil

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/07/2016 20:57:34

Bob Stevenson07/07/2016 21:10:22
295 forum posts
6 photos

Wow Neil!...What a clever man you are!........Very well done!

 

....Couple of times I have searched online over the years and never turned up anything!

Edited By Bob Stevenson on 07/07/2016 21:20:39

Michael Gilligan07/07/2016 22:15:12
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13823 forum posts
603 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 07/07/2016 20:56:09:

That spurred some interesting googling. Bramah worked with Maudslay to produce lock-making equipment.

.

Hence my earlier comment

MichaelG.

Alan Johnson 708/07/2016 09:51:30
70 forum posts
13 photos

About 30 years ago I saw some old (200 years +) Chinese locks a friend brought back from Peking (then). He lived there, so had time to browse the markets. Very interesting.

Alan.

Neil Wyatt08/07/2016 10:36:28
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Moderator
16436 forum posts
685 photos
74 articles
Posted by Bob Stevenson on 07/07/2016 21:10:22:

Wow Neil!...What a clever man you are!........Very well done!

Google is a plausible substitute for intelligence under some circumstances

Neil

Brian G08/07/2016 13:50:00
557 forum posts
22 photos
Posted by Alan Johnson 7 on 08/07/2016 09:51:30:

About 30 years ago I saw some old (200 years +) Chinese locks a friend brought back from Peking (then). He lived there, so had time to browse the markets. Very interesting.

Alan.

I'm curious Alan, were they in any way similar to these padlocks, where a shaped key pushes down spring leaves to allow the shackle to slide sideways out of the lock? **LINK**

As a child I was fascinated by the carvings on my great aunt's camphorwood chest which had a lock of this type.

Brian

Alan Johnson 708/07/2016 21:04:51
70 forum posts
13 photos

From memory - which is excellent after 30 years, I think they are the same, BUT I will ask for photographs the week after next.

I am in Paris now, back to Perth (Western Australia) next week. Back to work following week. I will email Douglas who is in Canberra - the other side of Australia, and post a reply.

Isn't the internet wonderful! In the past it would all be Airmail at best.

Alan

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