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Next Project - guess?

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pgk pgk24/03/2016 20:47:52
1914 forum posts
288 photos

Materials have arrived for the first phase.. which is going to push my abilities. And that gentlemen and ladies means I'm hoping you will all tolerate me leaning on you heavily for advice.

I'll start a new thread when I'm at the off and load it with pics but first I want to finish a good tidy-up of the shed and I'll post a pic below of the first tranch materials (which includes some spare) for your speculations.

cam00507.jpg

cam00502.jpg

Dod24/03/2016 23:38:49
114 forum posts
7 photos

Plumbing ? wink

Martin Cottrell25/03/2016 01:09:33
297 forum posts
18 photos

1" scale Minnie traction engine?

JasonB25/03/2016 07:32:01
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18915 forum posts
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Next project - a trip to the scrappy to weigh in that copperwink 2

Could it be a boiler?

pgk pgk25/03/2016 07:55:23
1914 forum posts
288 photos

You guys are all just too smart

You're all correct. My attempt at a 1" minnine.. so it is plumbing and with my zero experience at boilermaking will likely end up as a trip to the scrappy....

...I don't have enough sress in my life...

Speedy Builder525/03/2016 09:03:01
2111 forum posts
146 photos

the copper is 'cheap' - wait till you buy the silver solder !!
BobH

pgk pgk25/03/2016 10:33:41
1914 forum posts
288 photos
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 25/03/2016 09:03:01:

the copper is 'cheap' - wait till you buy the silver solder !!
BobH

One of the questions for the near future was going to be 'how much do i need?'

Little about this hobby is cheap. Even with cheap materials it tends to be expensive tooling ...

Martin Cottrell25/03/2016 21:51:39
297 forum posts
18 photos

pgk

The Minnie boiler is a nice size for a first attempt at boiler making as the plates are a manageable size for flanging and bending (when annealed) and you don't need an industrial sized flame thrower to get things up to temperature quickly when silver soldering begins. I have built a couple of small boilers (first was a Minnie) and found it a reasonably easy exercise so long as you pay strict attention to a few fundamental details. Namely a good close fit of the various parts to be joined, scrupulously cleaned & well fluxed joint faces and adequate heat to bring everything up to soldering temperature quickly.

If you haven't already got it, get yourself a copy of Len Masons book on building the Minnie. It really will take you clearly and confidently through every aspect of the build. Sorry, I can't advise on the quantity of silver solder you are going to need but it shouldn't require a second mortgage on a boiler this size!

Regards Martin.

pgk pgk25/03/2016 22:42:20
1914 forum posts
288 photos

Martin,

I'm working by the book. I have to 'cos I'm thick and need word by word help But it's nice to hear that someone has made their own successful boiler....

And I'll be posting blow by blow accounts so others who follow will know what not to do. I did start today but for me it's all slow going.

Deep down I have the idea that if I can make a successful 1" boiler then it'd be cool to go for the 2"... but baby steps..

When it comes to cooking it up Les packs coke around the boiler.. anyone know if he lights it or just uses it as insulation?

JasonB26/03/2016 07:24:20
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He was probably also using a pump up parafin blowlamp - things have moved on.

Get yourself a few of the insulation blocks that CUP alloys or Chronos do and back those up with some thremolite or celcon blocks (make sure they are completly dry)

J

pgk pgk26/03/2016 08:14:28
1914 forum posts
288 photos

Jason,

Something like that is in my game plan. As to the coke as insulation I was wondering whether something like loose vermiculite could/should be used in addition?

I'm also debating whether to build the brazing hearth on top of my wooden bench (with a top sheet of steel + flagstone) indoors or to make up a block stand outside... Outside would be a nuisance keeping it dry and it has to be at a standing height for these old bones.

I'll start a new seperate thread later today and hope you'll keep an eye on it.. 'cos I'm sure going to need advice and your minnie knowledge on this (slow) build..

Edit: And just in case anyone thinks I plan on using the green worktop as the hearth area.. be assured it's a table in the middle of the floor

Edited By pgk pgk on 26/03/2016 08:16:15

JasonB26/03/2016 08:27:18
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I think you will be lacking ventilation for the big heats, OK for smaller stuff but you don't want to gas yourself. I do a lot of mine on teh corner of the bench but with both windows and the door open but for things that are going to need prolonged heating do it outside.

Also would hate for what happened in the last photo here to happen in your pristine workshop

Neil Wyatt26/03/2016 09:58:26
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18245 forum posts
714 photos
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Is that what they call a Dutch Oven?

Neil

pgk pgk26/03/2016 11:25:53
1914 forum posts
288 photos

Doors and windows do open.. but plastic frames and ply lined room... Outside has the vagaries of welsh weather so it may have to be plan C... I do have an openend weatherproof bay I sometimes use as a garage (tractor height).

I can't use either barn 'cos one has several hundred litres fuel and the other several tons timber and sawdust.

(I thought a dutch oven was just a large pot on a pile of coal with a windmill on top used for cooking tulip casseroles)

norman valentine26/03/2016 12:12:35
250 forum posts
35 photos

A word of caution, I used a large gas torch in my workshop to heat some metal for bending. When I had finished I had a layer of condensation over all metal surfaces which quickly turned to rust.

pgk pgk26/03/2016 17:45:59
1914 forum posts
288 photos
Posted by norman valentine on 26/03/2016 12:12:35:

A word of caution, I used a large gas torch in my workshop to heat some metal for bending. When I had finished I had a layer of condensation over all metal surfaces which quickly turned to rust.

pulled in some much wet air in ventilation? Not something one would think of ahead of it..

J Hancock26/03/2016 18:22:03
452 forum posts

For ' how to do it properly ', Alec Farmers book ( or series) in ME on Boilermaking is worth reading.

Before you start building.

Pero27/03/2016 03:09:03
115 forum posts

Not necessarily wet air in ventilation.

Combustion of fuel gases - propane and butane (or methane if you are using natural gas) generates carbon dioxide and water vapour so if you are burning a lot of gas in an enclosed space the warm air and cold machinery will lead to the inevitable.

Pero

Danny M2Z27/03/2016 05:50:07
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892 forum posts
283 photos
Posted by Pero on 27/03/2016 03:09:03:

Combustion of fuel gases - propane and butane (or methane if you are using natural gas) generates carbon dioxide and water vapour so if you are burning a lot of gas in an enclosed space the warm air and cold machinery will lead to the inevitable.

It also sets off all my workshop smoke detectors which inevitably brings the neighbours running as the things are pretty loud. Then loose another 1/2 hour explaining things.

* Danny M *

Dennis D27/03/2016 08:51:47
72 forum posts
2 photos

Heres a build log I intend to refer to when I start my Minnie. Unfortunately he skipped over the boiler making bit but there are some useful reference pics for other bits

**LINK**

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