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Peter Jones 2021/01/2021 21:24:42
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54 forum posts

Thanks for the link,

I had no idea this stuff was available online

That is something I've only ever seen on a Villiers engine race bike probably 50 years ago? Wasn't 'mine and never got into it.

My father would have known but he's been gone since 2004.

Edited By Peter Jones 20 on 21/01/2021 21:25:34

gary02/02/2021 06:34:11
126 forum posts
31 photos

this is an piece from an old motorcycle book explaining how to climb a frightful hill. a little commonsense and observation will enable many a frightful hill to be climbed by an engine in bad health. such abnormal hills generally owe there difficulty to one or two steep short pitches. when the engine begins to labour, jump off and run alongside for a few yards till the engine picks up freely again. keep a keen lookout from the tail of you eye for any by-roads coming down on to the hill at an angle, up which you may proceed to get a fresh start in emergencies. at worst if you have to push, pile all superfluous clothing on carrier before commencing to shove. it aso tells you how to remove the drive belt to aid pushing, obviously no clutch. the good old days?

Nigel McBurney 102/02/2021 09:54:26
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821 forum posts
3 photos

The one advantage of the leading link forks was that the suspension units were made by companies like Girling and Armstrong so a small manufacturer could apply the latest technology from these large companies to his bike suspension at reasonable cost .With Greeves the fork damping units were Girling and could be replaced easily and cheaply though they lasted a long time ,and the springing ,Metalastic rubber bushes,needed to be pressed in ,so you just posted off the whole bottom link to Greeves and it came back within a week. Other makers ie Dot ,DMW, Norman,Sun ,Cotton used commercial units ,spring /hydraulic damping which were easily changed when worn out or the spring rates could be changed ieasily ,Girling units also had the three position spring adjuster.

Circlip02/02/2021 11:33:56
1235 forum posts

" explaining how to climb a frightful hill"

Try that on Post Hill. A mate was going to try that on a Tiger Cub, we'd seen this on a monochrome (Black and white 405 line) tele in the early sixties. Got to the top, by walking, and looked down it, didn't happen.

On the way there though, he stopped to look at a Vinnie Rapide C in immaculate condition for sale. Went out for a test ride with the owner, came back and bought it - - - - £100.

Regards Ian.

Steviegtr02/02/2021 13:39:53
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1912 forum posts
253 photos

We used to ride our Trials bikes at Post Hill. Must admit when going up it , near the top you feel like the front end is coming over.

Steve.

Martyn Edwards 102/02/2021 15:14:50
24 forum posts
56 photos

My pride and joy 1972 Commando 750cc Interstate (Combat Engine) after a winter refurbishment which included a complete rewire, fitting of an Alton Electric Start, fresh paint and brake upgrade.

44f44c8f-792e-478f-8320-1481403858a8.jpeg

 

Edited By Martyn Edwards 1 on 02/02/2021 15:18:07

Tim Hammond02/02/2021 15:53:59
52 forum posts

On the topic of very steep hills, does anyone remember the cartoonist in "The Motor Cycle", Bill Thacker, I think his name was? Anyway, one of his cartoons, which I still remember after over 50 years with a chuckle, depicts a motorcyclist with his bike parked beside a roadsign saying "Steep Hill, 1 in x", and the man himself on his hands and knees peering over the edge of what appears to be a precipice. A fine cartoonist.

Phil P02/02/2021 16:29:41
749 forum posts
181 photos

I remember many years ago probably in the early 80's at a Post Hill trial, the main section was up the hill and back down through the trees.

I was on my BSA B40 at the time and coming back down through some undergrowth my gear lever caught on something and snicked it into neutral. I never knew that bike could accelerate as fast as that !!

All I remember was seeing the fast flowing beck at the bottom approaching at great speed and wondering how I was going to get out of it...........Then my helmet peak hooked itself over a low hanging branch and yanked me off the back of the bike, which luckily veered off and fell over just before it went into the water.

I thought I had got away with it until I heard the cheer and round of applause from about 20 on-lookers.

Happy days smiley

Peter Jones 2003/02/2021 15:41:25
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54 forum posts
Posted by gary on 02/02/2021 06:34:11:

this is an piece from an old motorcycle book explaining how to climb a frightful hill. a little commonsense and observation will enable many a frightful hill to be climbed by an engine in bad health. such abnormal hills generally owe there difficulty to one or two steep short pitches. when the engine begins to labour, jump off and run alongside for a few yards till the engine picks up freely again. keep a keen lookout from the tail of you eye for any by-roads coming down on to the hill at an angle, up which you may proceed to get a fresh start in emergencies. at worst if you have to push, pile all superfluous clothing on carrier before commencing to shove. it aso tells you how to remove the drive belt to aid pushing, obviously no clutch. the good old days?

That sounds like advice from the 1900's~1920's for normal highwayas it mentions roads coming in at an angle? (rather thasn tracks you would find off road)

Peter Jones 2003/02/2021 16:03:32
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54 forum posts
Posted by Phil P on 02/02/2021 16:29:41:

I remember many years ago probably in the early 80's at a Post Hill trial, the main section was up the hill and back down through the trees.

I was on my BSA B40 at the time and coming back down through some undergrowth my gear lever caught on something and snicked it into neutral. I never knew that bike could accelerate as fast as that !!

All I remember was seeing the fast flowing beck at the bottom approaching at great speed and wondering how I was going to get out of it...........Then my helmet peak hooked itself over a low hanging branch and yanked me off the back of the bike, which luckily veered off and fell over just before it went into the water.

I thought I had got away with it until I heard the cheer and round of applause from about 20 on-lookers.

Happy days smiley

I had a similar experience in the 80's when I was doing Enduro's.

Andre Zembruski and Geraint Jones (World Enduro champion at the time) set up a course somewhere in mid Wales with a 'rather steep' downhill. They put a checkpoint at the top so people would heve to stop and be warned.

I was riding same minute as my buddy Chris. (he won 250 Clubman championship 1980 or 81?) He went first, stopped and looked down then rolled over the edge. I thought 'pussy' and hit it as about 20mph in second gear. He says I passed him about 8ft in the air, upside down. I only remember 'fish tailing a couple of hundred yards bouncing from one sheep track to the next then seeing a cut down tree about 6ft diameter in front of me.

When I woke up, a kid was standing over me , first thing he said was 'why did you crash, we thought you were going to make it' Apparently I did make it almost all the way down but paniced when I saw tree, got sideways and high sided.

Bike was pretty bent up, the chromoly bars had finally bent (been on about 6 bikes previously) front wheel was hitting forks both sides and I was hurting like hell.

Bike started OK so I got instructions how to get back to start. Trying to wheelie over a bank, I found I had a bunch of broken ribs and almost crashed with the pain.

Found out later I caused a major panic, 4 ambulances were out looking for me, course marshals couldn't find me, they thought I was dead in a ditch somewhere but I was already packed up and on my way home (luckily girlfriend at the time was driving, she and a couple of other people loaded biker into van, no way I could do it) It was my worst crash ever but didn't put me off, later I got a 490 Maico (that tried to kill me many times)

JimmieS15/02/2021 19:20:20
265 forum posts
1 photos

Interview with Jonathan Rea, six times World Champion, on UTV (Ulster Television) tomorrow, Tuesday (16/02/21) at 22.45.

JimmieS15/02/2021 19:20:22
265 forum posts
1 photos

Interview with Jonathan Rea, six times World Champion, on UTV (Ulster Television) tomorrow, Tuesday (16/02/21) at 22.45.

JimmieS15/02/2021 19:20:23
265 forum posts
1 photos

Interview with Jonathan Rea, six times World Champion, on UTV (Ulster Television) tomorrow, Tuesday (16/02/21) at 22.45.

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