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Hopper01/11/2015 06:27:57
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5505 forum posts
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Posted by John Olsen on 01/11/2015 05:32:30: ...I have seen it claimed that Honda spent more developing the disc brake for the 750 four than BSA Triumph did developing their triples, although I don't know if that is true or not. But making a triple as multiple slices of vertically split crankcase does not seem very smart to me....

Edited By John Olsen on 01/11/2015 05:35:54

Quite possible on the development budget. I believe Doug Hele/Bert Hopwood made the first prototype triple in a back room at the factory pretty much off their own bat and had one up and running in 1962. But the management types decided the market would not take to multi-cylinder bikes so put it on ice until the Honda 4 was well in view in 68.

Probably stuck with the vertical case joints so existing antique machine tools could be used in manufacture. I don't think it makes much difference to oil leakage. It seems to be more the quality of the joints and sealant than the orientation. Most oil leaks originated in the top end where the heat did its work.

Edited By Hopper on 01/11/2015 06:31:59

thaiguzzi01/11/2015 06:46:07
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703 forum posts
131 photos
Posted by OuBallie on 30/10/2015 16:25:25:

Love that Norton, and the difference between old and new cars/bikes overloaded with computers.

Mention of RC motorcycles, I sold an RC model, of a Honda I think it was, in my shop in the '80s.

Everyone was sceptical, including myself, until that is I built one and tested it.

It worked a treat, with the 'steering' servo tilting the whole body of the bike aft of the front forks.

Here's my contribution, not mine I hasten to add, but it reminded me of my CB350 Twin I bought in 1972.

2015 and still in Ex-factory condition:

Honda 175

License disc says it all:

Honda 175

Even more so the odometer!:

Honda 174

Can confirm what Mike said about counter steering, it's the quickest way to put a 'bike down or get into a corner fast.

It went against the grain until tried, but too much and you are down.

Geoff - 4 wheels for me now, though I miss the feeling of freedom!

Memories. Passed my test on one of those in 77. CD 175 classed as an "old man's" bike, (which it was, 'cos it was my dad's), not to be confused with the CB 175, which with it's racier more up to date styling, had some pvc/velour tank strip. Jeez, the 70's and Jap styling errors...

thaiguzzi01/11/2015 07:28:38
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703 forum posts
131 photos

evg 2.jpgevg 3.jpgOk, i'll bite. Here's my T140, owned from new, 1979. Very, very non std. billet 89mm Weslake crank, Carrillo rods, nickel plated highly modified frame, Fournales shocks, etc etc.evg 1.jpg

Edited By thaiguzzi on 01/11/2015 07:35:36

thaiguzzi01/11/2015 07:31:18
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703 forum posts
131 photos

p2050016 da guz.jpgAnd here's my Guzzi. 89 Cali III, internally stock, very non std externally, owned about18-19 years.p2050015 da guz.jpg

thaiguzzi01/11/2015 07:34:13
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703 forum posts
131 photos

Just finishing off an air cooled monoshock trials bike project. A Yamilia - Yamaha 135cc 2T bored to 147cc in an 89 Aprilia Climber rolling chassis. Pics to follow, just got the paintwork back yesterday.

Mike.

Windy01/11/2015 11:48:20
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869 forum posts
185 photos

Good to see a thread on motorcycles as far as what connection to model engineering look at the number of miniature motorcycle engines made.

Even though I haven't ridden a motorcycle for 30 years I'm still involved with them mainly for pure speed attempts I know that it's not every bodies cup of tea but the camaraderie and help from these potential record breakers is phenomenal.

Here is a link to a motorcycle, car and the very way out speed machines site.

**LINK**

There are lads and lasses that are interested in model engineering who compete at these speed meetings.

You never know the flash steam hydro might get two wheels wink.

Windy

 

Edited By Windy on 01/11/2015 11:49:23

Yngvar F01/11/2015 11:57:29
68 forum posts
52 photos
Posted by Hopper on 01/11/2015 05:23:2

And a very nice hanger at that! I like the little air scoop on the front brake. Is that an aftermarket accessory or did they come standard like that some years?.

It's the original 8 inch brake.

Wolfie01/11/2015 14:27:54
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502 forum posts
Posted by thaiguzzi on 01/11/2015 07:28:38:

evg 2.jpgevg 3.jpgOk, i'll bite. Here's my T140, owned from new, 1979. Very, very non std. billet 89mm Weslake crank, Carrillo rods, nickel plated highly modified frame, Fournales shocks, etc etc.evg 1.jpg

Edited By thaiguzzi on 01/11/2015 07:35:36

heartheartheart I want one yes

Ian Abbott01/11/2015 14:54:05
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279 forum posts
21 photos

A very not standard 1954 MAC Velo. Ended it's life on a very un-level level crossing at a very antisocial speed. The comments centred around, "…you walked away from that!…" albeit with a shredded Belstaff and less skin.

Just think how well Velocettes would sell now if the company could have done a Morgan.

Ian1954 mac.jpg

Old Elan01/11/2015 15:10:27
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92 forum posts
34 photos
Posted by Ian Abbott on 01/11/2015 14:54:05:

Just think how well Velocettes would sell now if the company could have done a Morgan.

A wooden framed motorcycle?

Wouldn't have thought that a good idea!

wink

Ian Abbott01/11/2015 16:48:19
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279 forum posts
21 photos
Posted by Old Elan on 01/11/2015 15:10:27:A wooden framed motorcycle?

Wouldn't have thought that a good idea!

wink

Funny you should say that. Given the right circumstances, wood can be stronger and lighter than metal. And I remember seeing just recently wooden framed bicycles and somewhere a wooden motorcycle. I can't remember where, but I think it was maybe a college or university. Laminated wood and probably epoxy resin and some glassfibre.

And slightly to one side, is the fella' who's been building Brough Superior SS100s to original spec. and now has a newly designed SS00, built "…as George would have wanted…" or words to that effect. I have the web page somewhere, I'll see if I can find it. Apparently at about £50,000, which 'aint too bad, considering what a modern superbike is worth.

Can't help a bit of name dropping here, but I was born just around the corner from the site of George Brough's works in Basford, and then we moved to just up the road from Pendine, George's pile at Redhill. As teenagers we'd hang out on the bus stop bench and watch him drifting his E Type in a controlled slide out of the drive onto the A60. Just down the road was Billy Wing's Velocette dealership, a wonderfully grimy and crowded ex corner shop, where purchases weren't necessary to ensure conversation.

Ian

JA01/11/2015 17:31:36
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1214 forum posts
73 photos
Posted by Old Elan on 01/11/2015 15:10:27:

A wooden framed motorcycle?

Wouldn't have thought that a good idea!

wink

I think someone put a Triumph Twin engine in to a home made plywood frame around 1960. I also recollect that plywood was better quality then. Ex-aircraft industry?

JA

Bob Brown 101/11/2015 17:34:16
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1021 forum posts
127 photos

Made of Wood

wooden.jpg

Old Elan01/11/2015 17:44:48
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92 forum posts
34 photos

'Given the right circumstances, wood can be stronger and lighter than metal. I remember seeing just recently wooden framed bicycles and somewhere a wooden motorcycle'.

Just being facetious! devil Plenty of wooden bikes about and a few motorcycles too.

Neil Wyatt01/11/2015 17:45:20
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80 articles

> License disc says it all:

Ah well, he can bin it now.

Neil

Mike Poole01/11/2015 17:59:56
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3047 forum posts
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There was an article in bike magazine in the 70's about a wooden framed motorcycle, is was done as an engineering project by a student, it had the name red shift which always makes me smile.

Mike

stevetee01/11/2015 20:29:21
142 forum posts
14 photos

There is a bloke near here who takes his wooden vehicles fairly seriously. Having read 'flying on 4 wheels' by Frank Costin he scratch built the trike below , wooden chassis, wooden body, wooden fuel tank, in only a few thousand hours. 602cc, 100+mph 55 mpg. Has been described as' the worlds most aerodynamic car in day to day use' I went on a trip to Zurich with the buider back in the day , someone said i would go out in a wooden car and come back in a wooden box. I didn't.  He has got bored with engins now and builds HPV's Human powerd vehiclestryane.jpgpict5437.jpg

Edited By stevetee on 01/11/2015 20:31:24

Mike Poole01/11/2015 21:32:48
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Posted by Hopper on 01/11/2015 06:27:57:

Probably stuck with the vertical case joints so existing antique machine tools could be used in manufacture. I don't think it makes much difference to oil leakage. It seems to be more the quality of the joints and sealant than the orientation. Most oil leaks originated in the top end where the heat did its work.

Edited By Hopper on 01/11/2015 06:31:59

My experience on my T150V was the the narrow gasket faces between the rocker boxes and the head squeezed the gasket out which led to a decent oil leak. Some people tried copper gaskets which also was the solution for the head gasket. I often thought machining an O ring groove in the rocker box gasket face may be a solution but I think it would be rather difficult unless using a cnc mill.

Mike

Ian Abbott01/11/2015 22:18:47
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279 forum posts
21 photos

For gaskets like the narrow rocker covers, we used to glue the paper gasket to the cover and let it dry clamped to a flat surface, then give it a light smear of grease before assembly. Never had one leak. 'Course, if you ever wanted to get them off an aluminium cover, you were in for a happy half an hour. Those jobs went to the apprentice. Trying to hold the damn thing down and not take metal off with the glue was an exercise in patience and futility.

Ian

duncan webster01/11/2015 22:50:55
3444 forum posts
63 photos

I think they eventually got round to making the rocker box part of the head on the very last Triumph twins, which must have helped a lot, no longer had the push rod forcs opening the joint. It only took them 40 years!

On my Velo you were supposed to set the tappets with the engine hot, but you had to take the tank off to get at them, so you had to take it for a thrash, then whip the tank off quick!

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