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thaiguzzi01/07/2019 03:42:12
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555 forum posts
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Posted by thaiguzzi on 16/05/2019 04:43:28:
Posted by Windy on 01/12/2018 12:03:21:
Posted by thaiguzzi

Very nice.

I presume alignment is on the top portion with the knife edges, and the balancing done below on the 2 pairs of brgs?

Many years ago, we did static balancing on our knife edges too.

Bob R - lovely work on the pre unit single.

The bearings are mainly for aligning the pressed up crankshaft similar to a Alpha-Tru aligner the straight edges for balancing.

alpha tru

Bump.

If anybody sees or hears of one of these for sale, please pm me.

Mucho appreciated.

Bump.

Another month, another bump.

Anyone?

Hopper01/07/2019 05:04:41
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Looks easy enough to make?

Windy01/07/2019 10:41:50
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734 forum posts
221 photos

At least this old git is of use doing a few repairs and modifications for true friends and enthusiasts it does keep you active.

Love of speed machines is never far away and keep doing bits on my full size project.

My friends. steam rocket bike is on test hold at the moment due to work commotments.

He has a drag racing type slipper clutch he made with all the load data for me to use.

Anyway my monthly treat at Elvington Top Speed soon it's Tuesday July 16th.

Neil Wyatt01/07/2019 22:40:16
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74 articles
Posted by Windy on 19/06/2019 07:44:33:
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 18/06/2019 19:32:55:

That would be my old bike then :D

Glad to see the old girl's still pumping out the ponies. I made the entire turbo system complete with water-cooled intercooler, secondary fuel rail, 3" straight-through exhaust and extended swing-arm in my 10' x 7' garden shed. I've got a good workshop now and some nice equipment but back in 2007 the only tools was a battered drill press, and old Atlas10 lathe and an even more battered 6x4 bandsaw.

The only motivation I needed was someone telling me not to bother trying because it was doomed to failure.

Pete I was similar in my early days very little equipment but loads of enthusiasm had no qualification and learnt by trial and error.

Was told a few years ago would not call you an engineer more a tinkerer.

The following year did a one way average speed over he 1/4 mile of 207.9 mph.

The photo is a bit crap my young Sister had made a scrap book of my exploits otherwise would have very few pictures of those days.1973

First year with the two engines

EPIC!

peak401/07/2019 23:37:17
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809 forum posts
67 photos
Posted by thaiguzzi on 01/07/2019 03:42:12:
Bump.

Another month, another bump.

Anyone?

Could you use a grinding wheel balancer like this?? on ebay UK.
I know some are made in India, which might be a bit cheaper and closer.

 

See also This One

Bill

Edited By peak4 on 01/07/2019 23:38:33

thaiguzzi02/07/2019 04:53:08
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555 forum posts
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Thanx for the suggestions, yes i could make one, yes the Vertex is expensive and both the above are suitable.

However,

i like that Alpha original purely because it is classic Brit tooling and i'm into that sort of stuff.

Another would be a genuine between centres crank aligner like HD used or a larger J&S bench centres.

Windy02/07/2019 08:46:17
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734 forum posts
221 photos

The one I made was out of mainly scrap my classic bike friend has two sizes of the Alpha and used them a lot when he used to do a lot of work for a now gone local motorcycle dealer.

thaiguzzi04/07/2019 13:52:23
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555 forum posts
130 photos
Posted by Windy on 02/07/2019 08:46:17:

The one I made was out of mainly scrap my classic bike friend has two sizes of the Alpha and used them a lot when he used to do a lot of work for a now gone local motorcycle dealer.

Let me know if he ever wants to sell them, especially the bigger one.

Ta velly much.

Windy04/07/2019 23:38:17
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734 forum posts
221 photos
Posted by thaiguzzi on 04/07/2019 13:52:23:
Posted by Windy on 02/07/2019 08:46:17:

The one I made was out of mainly scrap my classic bike friend has two sizes of the Alpha and used them a lot when he used to do a lot of work for a now gone local motorcycle dealer.

Let me know if he ever wants to sell them, especially the bigger one.

Ta velly much.

I doubt he will ever sell one he restores numerous classic bikes not for resale but for his own personal use

thaiguzzi05/07/2019 04:46:51
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555 forum posts
130 photos
Posted by Windy on 04/07/2019 23:38:17:
Posted by thaiguzzi on 04/07/2019 13:52:23:
Posted by Windy on 02/07/2019 08:46:17:

The one I made was out of mainly scrap my classic bike friend has two sizes of the Alpha and used them a lot when he used to do a lot of work for a now gone local motorcycle dealer.

Let me know if he ever wants to sell them, especially the bigger one.

Ta velly much.

I doubt he will ever sell one he restores numerous classic bikes not for resale but for his own personal use

Ok, thanx for the prompt reply., cheers.

Hopper05/07/2019 08:39:57
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3653 forum posts
72 photos
Posted by thaiguzzi on 02/07/2019 04:53:08:

Another would be a genuine between centres crank aligner like HD used or a larger J&S bench centres.

I think you can still buy the Rowe crank truing stand with indicators which is in the HD style. Costs about $1,000 though.

thaiguzzi06/07/2019 06:23:50
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555 forum posts
130 photos
Posted by Hopper on 05/07/2019 08:39:57:
Posted by thaiguzzi on 02/07/2019 04:53:08:

Another would be a genuine between centres crank aligner like HD used or a larger J&S bench centres.

I think you can still buy the Rowe crank truing stand with indicators which is in the HD style. Costs about $1,000 though.

I dunno what the genuine Rowe one costs, but the Taiwanese copy , which most people buy and use, is approaching that figure.

Windy06/07/2019 15:01:38
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734 forum posts
221 photos
Posted by thaiguzzi on 06/07/2019 06:23:50:
Posted by Hopper on 05/07/2019 08:39:57:
Posted by thaiguzzi on 02/07/2019 04:53:08:

Another would be a genuine between centres crank aligner like HD used or a larger J&S bench centres.

I think you can still buy the Rowe crank truing stand with indicators which is in the HD style. Costs about $1,000 though.

I dunno what the genuine Rowe one costs, but the Taiwanese copy , which most people buy and use, is approaching that figure.

Between centres is ok providing they are perfect but a crank aligner chap mentions that the centres can be distorted sometimes after pullers etc. have been used on them.

Windy06/07/2019 16:24:39
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734 forum posts
221 photos

If you are feeling fit a simple way to align single cylinder cranks.

**LINK**

JA06/07/2019 19:07:42
772 forum posts
44 photos

Only once have I aligned a crankshaft and it was not difficult. I have let others do it.

I have often wondered about crankshaft alignment. Obviously the crankshaft must be aligned for the smooth running of the engine. However I have heard two "stories" that suggest it is not critical.

The old AJS company at Wolverhampton use to put one shaft of the assembled crank into a tightish hole in a big hard wood block. With the shaft vertical the crank would be turned and the eccentricity marked with a piece of chalk. The assembly would be tapped with a mallet until true. This came from either a person who worked there or one of the sons of the owners.

SAAB, as many will remember, made a car powered by a three cylinder two stroke engine. This had a built up crank and the company spent a lot of time trying to find the best way to align it. In the end it was found that the crank aligned itself when the engine first started. The source of this was a very senior Honda engineer, possibly a director of the UK company, who was responsible for introducing the little 600cc sports car in the late 1960s and 750cc four to Britain.

Hopper07/07/2019 02:15:45
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3653 forum posts
72 photos
Posted by Windy on 06/07/2019 16:24:39:

If you are feeling fit a simple way to align single cylinder cranks.

**LINK**

Looks scary to me. He could at least bolt down the stand with the lead block on top of it. Just begging to crush a finger with it flapping about all over the place like that.

I think with my fitness levels I'll stick with the traditional Thor copper mallet.

thaiguzzi07/07/2019 09:18:18
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555 forum posts
130 photos
Posted by Windy on 06/07/2019 16:24:39:

If you are feeling fit a simple way to align single cylinder cranks.

**LINK**

Bloody Hell! Pardon my French. That's not a tiddly 125 crank either. That's a bit of beef, possibly a Brit 350-500 single.

Involute Curve07/07/2019 09:31:05
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328 forum posts
86 photos

That looks like the method used by Velocette as described by Phil Irving in some of his books and Technical papers on such matters.

old mart08/07/2019 20:24:00
439 forum posts
42 photos

I fitted a new big end and rod to a 125 Yamaha engine at work for one of my workmates. We had everything to hand for the job and I found it to be easier than I had feared. As the big end pin was plain, I had to pay attention to the width of the assembly, so it got measured first, also the con rod side float, just in case. I used a copper faced mallet to get the last bit trued up. I managed 0.001" tir which must have been good enough, as the bike was still going strong three years later.

Villiers engines used pressed in hardened plugs to expand the crankpin after alignment. They had to be drilled out before dismantling the crankshaft to reduce fretting.

When I scrapped an old 350 Royal Enfield model G back in the 60's, I was surprised to find a ground steel liner in the big end of the rod, and the white metal bearing on the crankpin.

Edited By old mart on 08/07/2019 20:29:06

Samsaranda08/07/2019 20:46:14
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776 forum posts
5 photos

Back in the early sixties I owned what started out as a rigid framed Matchless G80 that I transferred to a 1956 swinging arm frame, unfortunately soon after the frame swop the big end decided to let go and had to be renewed. Stripped the engine and took the flywheel assembly to our local motorcycle shop to have a new big end fitted and the flywheels re-assembled. Built up the engine with the new big end assembly and everything seemed fine for about 100 miles and then something catastrophic happened with the flywheel assembly and the engine had to be stripped down again. When it was all apart I found that one of the nuts on the crank pin had split in half and the flywheels became independent of each other. Fortunately the engine was only ticking over when it happened so no real damage done. It transpired that standard practice was to renew the crankpin nuts when the assembly was disturbed but this didn’t happen when my big end was replaced so an apologetic mechanic rebuilt the assembly again this time with new nuts. Soon had the engine reassembled and the bike working again, have vivid memories of how viciously that engine could kick back if the manual advance and retard was not set correctly on starting.

Dave W

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