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Adept and Super Adept Register

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Martin King 212/08/2018 09:52:25
608 forum posts
223 photos

Hi All, just looked up my records and we have had exactly 6 of these over the years in various sorts of condition and the prices varied from £72 to £165 for the best one. They always seem popular for what ever reason and we have never had bad feedback or a problem with any of them.

Just my 2p's worth.......

Cheers, Martin

Neil Wyatt12/08/2018 11:11:54
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Posted by Martin King 2 on 12/08/2018 09:52:25:

Hi All, just looked up my records and we have had exactly 6 of these over the years in various sorts of condition and the prices varied from £72 to £165 for the best one. They always seem popular for what ever reason and we have never had bad feedback or a problem with any of them.

Just my 2p's worth.......

Cheers, Martin

The electrics are always very reliable, despite the age

Neil

Andrew Tinsley12/08/2018 13:02:25
919 forum posts

Hello RevStew,

Don't you mean swarf collector, mine never gets the chance to get dusty.

Andrew.

not done it yet12/08/2018 14:23:34
3358 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Andrew Tinsley on 12/08/2018 13:02:25:

Hello RevStew,

Don't you mean swarf collector, mine never gets the chance to get dusty.

Andrew.

Were fymords that expensive when Adepts were still a popular purchase option , for hobbyists, back then?

Michael Gilligan12/08/2018 15:05:38
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14011 forum posts
608 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 12/08/2018 14:23:34:

Were fymords that expensive when Adepts were still a popular purchase option , for hobbyists, back then?

.

The ML7 was launched in August 1946, at £34

Not sure how the Adept prices varied with time, but 12s 6d is in a commonly seen advert.

MichaelG.

pgk pgk12/08/2018 17:49:35
1453 forum posts
282 photos

It's interesting to note that **LINK**

puts the relative value of £34 in 1946 as £995 now but **LINK**

puts a labourers wages as £1 a day in 1946 and other sites list that wage as £100-£160 per day now i.e £34 would be nearer to £4K

pgk

Howard Lewis14/08/2018 15:40:04
2337 forum posts
2 photos

Fifteen years ago,, when considering buying a new, fully equipped Myford 7 Series, the bill was going to be nearly £8K! I didn't!

A friend in his 90s now, recalls going with his father to buy a ML 2, and taking it home on the bus , having paid 12/6 (62.5 p) for it!

The Super Adept was a product of it's time. What people could afford and what it was capable of doing, in the right hands.

Remember, lots of machines, locomotives etc were made on machines without micrometer dials or power feeds, long before the modern conveniences that we all now enjoy.

Those were the days when skill had not been overcome by the stopwatch and avarice, and was valued.

Howard

Michael Gilligan13/09/2018 20:25:28
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14011 forum posts
608 photos

Spotted on ebay ... an Adept with an interestingly large chuck surprise

**LINK**

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/vintage-super-adept-model-makers-small-lathe/123361348570

MichaelG.

RevStew13/09/2018 21:25:24
87 forum posts

Not unusual to find one with such a relatively large chuck. This one will make plenty of cash as it has the rare speed reducing pulley wheel from the same firm.

RevStew13/09/2018 21:27:49
87 forum posts

I've been reading of people building small compression ignition engines for model aircraft, without even the benefit of a lathe, so an Adept, however basic, is still capable of amazing work, in the hands of someone with time, and ability.

Michael Gilligan14/09/2018 08:54:04
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14011 forum posts
608 photos
Posted by RevStew on 13/09/2018 21:25:24:

Not unusual to find one with such a relatively large chuck.

.

I am in no position to argue, RevStew; having never felt the need to research the market ... but I am astonished by that assertion.

Can you give any explanation, please, as to why such a disproportionately large chuck is 'not unusual' ?

The best I can think of is that misguided people fit such things, then realise their mistake and decide to sell it on.

[this would skew the distribution, and give the appearance that such a contraption was commonplace]

Grateful for your thoughts, and perhaps some illustrations.

MichaelG.

RevStew14/09/2018 09:13:06
87 forum posts

The 4 jaw chuck was an expensive option for the Adept, and it was only in later years, after the original chucks were no longer available, that people started fitting the chucks that were available, which were generally bigger than the standard. These larger chucks cause the issues described below, (from the lathes.co.uk site), courtesy of Mr Andrew Webster. I did try to contact him for permission to reproduce this extract here, but his email did not work. I hope this is OK in the spirit of the discussion. Apologies to all concerned if not.

Cast iron's most striking characteristic is its high resistance to sliding wear. Few lathes of the time featured pre-stressed ball or roller bearings. These were costly in the smaller sizes until the 1950s. The better large lathes therefore often had replaceable bushings of bronze or gunmetal, but many gave excellent service with a hardened and polished steel mandrel running in a lapped iron split-housing. Most, if not all, of the small model-maker's lathes had an unhardened mild steel spindle running direct in an iron housing. These were seldom polished or lapped, and the sometimes the housing was bored without reaming, like the Adept.

This being said, the longevity of this arrangement is remarkable if attention was paid to cleanliness and lubrication. It is nevertheless likely that an Adept or similar spindle will exhibit significant wear, especially at the tail housing where an excessively heavy chuck could cause headstock centre drop. Some owners fitted cycle oil cups which did much to keep things oiled. Some fitted fibre shims to stop oil running quickly out of the sawn housing. Others neglected the oiling, paid no attention to iron and corundum dust, and responded to heavy wear by screwing the housings together until they fractured. This is a common fault on small, old lathes.

Michael Gilligan14/09/2018 09:27:39
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14011 forum posts
608 photos

Thanks for that ... All perfectly logical

BUT the chuck in the ebay photo takes us to a whole new level of farce !!

MichaelG.

Neil Wyatt14/09/2018 10:50:51
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Moderator
16568 forum posts
687 photos
75 articles

An excellent example of using what you have, not what you need. Probably worth more with the countershaft although no catch plate or four jaw (the best of all the bits). Let's hope the bearings haven't been ruined.

I must get mine connected up to a motor... I screwed my new spindle for a 50mm lever-scroll chuck. Unless the seller of that lathe has cut off the outer part of the jaws I doubt that have any more capacity than my chuck with is a fraction of the size!

The extra metal and protuberances will enhance it's performance as a boat anchor

Neil

RevStew14/09/2018 11:06:03
87 forum posts

Still looking for a nice original 'super' not much luck so far. Or a 'Wizard' etc. One will turn up eventually I'm sure.

David T14/09/2018 12:14:27
71 forum posts
14 photos

We used to have a Super Adept, although it moved onto a new owner a few years ago. It had no topslide, but that may have been a blessing in disguise given the "Gibraltar" style toolpost that it came with. I installed the oilers, added an NVR switch, and made a new spindle with an M14 nose to take a modern chuck. I also had to make a new motor pulley as the original was massively eccentric.

Edited By David T on 14/09/2018 12:15:30

Ian S C14/09/2018 12:14:53
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7447 forum posts
230 photos

That 3 jaw chuck was probably the smallest the owner could find, the 4 jaw it a little fiddlelly but at that size you really need the grip of the 4th jaw, I have at times thought that if I could get a 3 jaw chuck about 1 1/2" dia it would be handy.

I have a book "The Simple Lathe and its Accessories" The "Amateur Mechanic & Work" handbooks. First published in 1923, mine is the Australian edition 1943, I thought it had the price, but no, it does say that the stand and flywheel and treadle are available as an extra at less than 3 pounds, I have seen adverts giving a price of ?5 . The 4 jaw chuck ?1 - 12 - 6. 

I bought my Super Adept in Dunedin NZ in 1962 for 5 NZ pounds, with the jack shaft included.

I have 2 other books in the same series"metal Turning Made Easy", and "Small Lathes Making and Using".

Ian S C

Edited By Ian S C on 14/09/2018 13:06:11

Michael Gilligan16/09/2018 19:15:20
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14011 forum posts
608 photos

It sold for £170

Neil Wyatt16/09/2018 19:39:34
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16568 forum posts
687 photos
75 articles

surprise

Maybe someone wanted the chuck...

Allen Venter19/05/2019 01:49:11
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5 forum posts

Anyone have any spares?, im after a main lead screw, cross slide and top slide, i have a bed with tailstock. Thanks.

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