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The Interesting Video Thread

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Nigel Bennett04/12/2015 16:19:42
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431 forum posts
11 photos

Thanks for that, Neil!

They make it look so easy, forging those rods. Amazing.

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:17:48

Philip Rowe04/12/2015 16:43:26
225 forum posts
31 photos

What always amuses me in these films, is how everything always fits and lines up perfectly.

Never happens in my workshop! !

Phil

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:18:17

Richard Marks04/12/2015 16:45:51
210 forum posts
8 photos

Wot! No health & safety kit and risk assessment, what is this world coming to?

(This was the real world)

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:18:30

Speedy Builder504/12/2015 17:38:46
2494 forum posts
196 photos

No hydraulic test then ?

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:18:48

Boiler Bri04/12/2015 18:41:30
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839 forum posts
199 photos

Great post. I like the brave guys under the loco checking the bolts align with the holes. How would he have said no! Stop. My heads in the way😳

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:19:00

KWIL04/12/2015 19:51:50
3473 forum posts
66 photos

In those days if you wanted a small lip on a piece of metal, you could bend it up at 90 degrees, place a spacer with the thickness equal to the required upstand and then work on the back of the power guillotine. Now the guillotine is all boxed insad

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:19:16

Ron Colvin04/12/2015 21:59:35
79 forum posts
6 photos

Can anyone identify what type of locomotive number 56 is?.

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:19:30

julian atkins04/12/2015 23:07:36
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1246 forum posts
353 photos

hi Ron,

my memory is a bit vague on this but it was WD (War Department) loco built at the North British loco works to an LMS design with added westinghouse pump etc. it is definitely the NB works at Glasgow. others far more expert than me on such matters may be able to give further details.

cheers,

julian

Edited By julian atkins on 04/12/2015 23:08:40

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 07/12/2015 08:19:44

Nick_G05/12/2015 08:56:42
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1808 forum posts
744 photos

.

Martin Connelly05/12/2015 12:58:05
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2003 forum posts
214 photos

If you read David Clark's "The Practical Engineer" articles you will read about accidents and near misses that could have had a lot worse consequences. If they had been filming and someone got hurt you would never have seen the film. People just accepted injuries and death as part of the process. The biggest killer due to work is currently asbestosis due to people working in their own clothes with just a cloth cap to keep their hair clean. A lot of their own families have also died from the asbestos carried home. The good old days were never that good.

If anyone thinks we should go back to those days then think about having to go round to someone's house and telling them that their loved one has been killed in an industrial accident.

I work in an industrial engineering company and nowadays it's a big deal if someone cuts their finger. That is how I like it.

Martin

Steve Withnell05/12/2015 16:51:07
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843 forum posts
222 photos

Are our own videos "interesting" ? This is my set up for machining the Whittle V8 crankshaft - another project on hold!   The crank is held in slotted tubes to add back some rigidity whilst the crank webs are finished off.

Steve

Edited By Steve Withnell on 05/12/2015 16:51:33

Edited By Steve Withnell on 05/12/2015 16:54:38

colin hawes06/12/2015 17:01:54
553 forum posts
18 photos

I have just got round to watching the videos, they are really fascinating, thanks to all for showing them. More, More! Colin

Muzzer06/12/2015 19:25:38
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2904 forum posts
448 photos

There's a bad echo in here!

Link to recent Engineering Video thread.

Perhaps they should be combined?

David Colwill06/12/2015 22:11:59
774 forum posts
40 photos

I watched "The watchmakers apprentice" on Netflix last night and highly recommend it ! The level of skill is nothing short of amazing.

David

ChrisH06/12/2015 23:53:56
1009 forum posts
30 photos

Hopefully the link below will go to a vid showing how `RR built Merlin engines in WW2:

**LINK**

they were very sophisticated and clever and far more advanced for their day than I had imagined! Excellent stuff!

Chris

Nick_G07/12/2015 00:30:23
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1808 forum posts
744 photos
Posted by ChrisH on 06/12/2015 23:53:56:

Hopefully the link below will go to a vid showing how `RR built Merlin engines in WW2:

**LINK**

they were very sophisticated and clever and far more advanced for their day than I had imagined! Excellent stuff!

Chris

.

That was brilliant. smiley

Not only did they think of everything it's the speed at which they set it all up.

Nick

Neil Wyatt07/12/2015 08:23:02
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Moderator
18893 forum posts
734 photos
80 articles

I hold my hands up for starting a new thread when I should,have put my post here. I have merged the two so sorry if that makes some of teh discussion disjointed, but at least the apparently off-topic comment (which appears to have been meant to be a response to comment in the other thread) now has a context.

I've also removed now irrelevant comments on content. Thanks to Jason for cooling it down yesterday.

Neil

Cornish Jack08/12/2015 15:55:16
1219 forum posts
171 photos

Just seen on my other regular forum - Pprune ...**LINK**

The light front end on the leading tractor very reminiscent of a threshing rig arriving at my uncle's farm during WW2. The approach was up a short, steep 'tump' and the front end kept lifting. The solution?? - the largest (and she was LARGE!) Landgirl was selected to stand on the front axle and balance was restored. Not sure that this would be so simple today!!cheeky

rgds

Bill

Neil Wyatt08/12/2015 16:48:02
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Moderator
18893 forum posts
734 photos
80 articles

Posted by Cornish Jack on 08/12/2015 15:55:16:

The approach was up a short, steep 'tump' and the front end kept lifting.

We call them 'twmps' (OK, technically it's twmpathau) on my side of the channel. Lovely word. there's a 'Hetty Pegler's Tump' in Gloucestershire. Twmpath is also the Welsh word for ceilidh!

Neil

Cornish Jack08/12/2015 21:28:14
1219 forum posts
171 photos

Neil - there's interesting then, boyocheeky but this incident was in Herefordshire so it was a single, not a double U!! Mind you, I can claim usage for either, being a Cornish/Welsh half-breedindecision... there's proper Celtic for you!

rgds

Bill

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