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Couple of things at Lidl

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Mick B120/02/2018 12:21:53
495 forum posts
29 photos
Posted by peak4 on 19/02/2018 22:37:37:
Posted by Mick B1 on 19/02/2018 19:44:00:
Posted by peak4 on 19/02/2018 18:58:23:
Posted by Mick B1 on 19/02/2018 18:31:27:

Lidl claim the compressor is 'low noise' - anybody know if that's true?

This review claims 97dBa, so it's all relative to what you expect; certainly not quiet line a Jun-Air or Bambi

Bill

Thanks - that answers the question. Not suitable for running stationary steam engines indoors on air, then.

I don't know how much air your steam engines are likely to consume, but would an airbrush compressor do the job?

Bill

My missus has one.

I haven't yet quite developed the nerve to ask to try it.

Need a bit of time here, I think... laugh

Neil Wyatt20/02/2018 22:17:37
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Posted by Mick B1 on 20/02/2018 12:21:53:
Posted by peak4 on 19/02/2018 22:37:37:
Posted by Mick B1 on 19/02/2018 19:44:00:
Posted by peak4 on 19/02/2018 18:58:23:
Posted by Mick B1 on 19/02/2018 18:31:27:

Lidl claim the compressor is 'low noise' - anybody know if that's true?

This review claims 97dBa, so it's all relative to what you expect; certainly not quiet line a Jun-Air or Bambi

Bill

Thanks - that answers the question. Not suitable for running stationary steam engines indoors on air, then.

I don't know how much air your steam engines are likely to consume, but would an airbrush compressor do the job?

Bill

My missus has one.

I haven't yet quite developed the nerve to ask to try it.

Need a bit of time here, I think... laugh

I have one of these diaphragm compressors. I use it with an old fire extinguisher (300PSI rated) as a tank. It will run an unloaded Stuart 10V or any of my similar sized engines at a stupidly fast pace on about 10psi, but is a bit noisy. More of a spraygun compressor than an airbrush one

Mick B123/02/2018 13:28:58
495 forum posts
29 photos

Ah, and Lidl's Java Sumatra coffee they're selling at £1.99 a bag, loaded 3 dessertspoons to a standard 10-cup coffee filter, makes a good ar$e-kicking mug, too... laughlaugh

Ady104/03/2018 17:13:41
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3166 forum posts
421 photos

cordless drills, inverter welders at 60 bananas, kneeling pads

etc etc

grab em while you can

Ady112/03/2018 02:03:28
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3166 forum posts
421 photos

Electric Brad nail and staple gun for a tenner this week, does to 14mm

Mick B112/03/2018 18:46:59
495 forum posts
29 photos

The little Parkside jigsaw is a useful thing too. Lidl released it in their stores yeterday and mine's just made a batch of Easter bunnies to go in the grandkids' egg baskets. laugh

Journeyman13/03/2018 16:56:44
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489 forum posts
68 photos

Picked up these at our local store today:-

lidl.jpg

The angle finder has a few rough edges but seems accurate enough, the lock isn't up to much but overall not bad for £9.99 with a 3 year warranty. They had a stack of digital calipers for the same price but I resisted as I already have three. Loads of air tools as well but as I don't have a compressor... The hot glue gun is small fairly flimsy but works, I don't know what the glue is but it sticks quite well, £5.99 with six glue sticks. Takes about 5 minute to warm up. Oh yes, picked up a pair of work trousers for £9.99, seem quite well made but I'm sure you don't need to look at a pair of my strides!

John

Edited By Journeyman on 13/03/2018 16:58:38

Mick B113/03/2018 19:07:06
495 forum posts
29 photos

The glue gun looks the same as one I got as part of a 'dent-pulling kit' for the car after a brief argument with the corner of a uPVC window frame. It sort of worked - invariably the glued joint of bodywork to the pulling button was what popped as you pulled at the dent, but that was probably just as well. It never looked quite as it had before the incident, but as compared to a £250 excess and loss of no-claims I decided to accept the result.

I'd think the guns are ideal for ad-hoc wooden structures with non-safety-critical loadings. laugh

Mick B115/03/2018 17:19:28
495 forum posts
29 photos
Posted by Mick B1 on 12/03/2018 18:46:59:

The little Parkside jigsaw is a useful thing too. Lidl released it in their stores yeterday and mine's just made a batch of Easter bunnies to go in the grandkids' egg baskets. laugh

I'm glad I went and bought mine on release day - Sunday. Went into local Lidl again today and they're all gone.

Lots of other tools left.

Howard Lewis16/03/2018 15:58:05
1164 forum posts

Mentioning Bambi air compressors, you may be able to pick up a failed one, cheap.

DON'T test it with the cover off! If you do, you'll never rust!

The one at church failed. We stripped it out and a 1/4 UNF bolt had failed. It held a sort of welsh washer over a cast chamber, but had broken off flush with the bottom of the chamber. Drilling out was a nightmare. The head was embossed "12.9". At the cost of two drills, (one hard tipped) drilled it out and enlarged the hole so that could be tapped 1/2 x 40 tpi, Made up a stud, tapped 1/4 UNF at the upper end, and Loctited it in. Sealed the welsh washer to the chamber and the bolt with hylomar. As John Stevenson would have said, "Job's a good 'un" Works just like it always did. A replacement would have been £800!

Howard

clogs16/03/2018 17:18:43
366 forum posts
12 photos

Howard Lewis,

can I ask what is a Welsh washer.........?

Tim Stevens16/03/2018 17:44:38
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826 forum posts

From distant memory, before PC had been invented, a Welsh washer was a Core plug. That is, a dome-shaped disc of steel with a chamfered edge. It is placed in a casting hole with the sharp edge inwards, and given a smart tap. That is where the Welsh, being smart, have the advantage, see.

Tim

SillyOldDuffer16/03/2018 18:39:12
2786 forum posts
563 photos

Or is it a Welch Washer, so named to confuse the English?

not done it yet16/03/2018 19:11:28
1794 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Tim Stevens on 16/03/2018 17:44:38:

From distant memory, before PC had been invented, a Welsh washer was a Core plug. That is, a dome-shaped disc of steel with a chamfered edge. It is placed in a casting hole with the sharp edge inwards, and given a smart tap. That is where the Welsh, being smart, have the advantage, see.

Tim

I think you will find they are Welch plugs. Named after a couple pf brothers in the US.

Meunier16/03/2018 20:29:01
110 forum posts

Welsh washer, hmmm, seem to remember seeing one of those in the drawer of our Welsh Dresser.
DaveD

Ady126/03/2018 02:43:35
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3166 forum posts
421 photos

Electric impact guns in this week

30 bananas

Specifications:
Max. loosening torque (Nm): 320
Max. tightening torque (Nm): 100 (safety limited)
No-load rotation speed (rpm): 3,600
Tool holder: 1/2" external square

Edited By Ady1 on 26/03/2018 02:44:14

Neil Wyatt26/03/2018 09:11:32
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13397 forum posts
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I could have done with one of those yesterday, getting a brake caliper off to change my discs.

Clive Foster26/03/2018 10:01:46
1319 forum posts
29 photos

I have one of the electric impact guns. It is good value and pretty effective but in practice the specifications seem to be a bit optimistic. Somewhat bulky and I'm not completely sold on under car with 240 V electrics but a proper pro level windy impact gun is approaching ten times the price. Doubt if there is much to choose between it and the Machine Mart et al DIY windy gun offerings.

I doubt if it will shift anything needing much more than about 250 Nm / 180 ft lb to undo. Maybe clean dry oiled threads just tightened up but filthy dirty under the car. Nope. My rule of thumb is to expect that under the motor may take double what it was done up to. Had to resort to the 6 ft scaffold pole with 3/4 drive short extension welded on crossways to deal with something brake related under friend Mikes VW Touareg. But it zipped out the impossible to see, foot or so inside, top rear damper bolts on my P38 out so fast that I thought the socket had cammed off. Book says torqued to 92 ft lb, and they certainly weren't playing ball with the standard 1/2" breaker bar. With EAS wiring and air suspension pipes in very close proximity thats one bolt you really need to be certain of good socket & drive alignment when tackling.

Clive

Edited By Clive Foster on 26/03/2018 10:02:26

Neil Wyatt26/03/2018 11:07:46
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Moderator
13397 forum posts
576 photos
68 articles

Posted by Clive Foster on 26/03/2018 10:01:46:

Had to resort to the 6 ft scaffold pole with 3/4 drive short extension welded on crossways to deal with something brake related under friend Mikes VW Touareg.

My dad taught me the 'jack under the wheel wrench' trick.

In this case it needed a extractor for rounded nuts as on my previous attempt the socket had spoilt the bolt heads.

It was 3/8" drive and I managed to fubar a cheap 3/8 ratchet spanner. In the end a 1/2 to 3/8 adaptor, a foot to keep the extension in line and both hands eventually rewarded me with a very loud crack. A much longer bar failed because I couldn't keep it straight and apply enough force.

Mark Rand26/03/2018 22:34:23
357 forum posts

Have you invested in a tube of anti-seize as a result of this?

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