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grinding a masonry drill for steel

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fizzy02/06/2015 21:02:00
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what are they made from (main drill body) and can they be ground for steel?

Michael Gilligan02/06/2015 21:57:08
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Posted by fizzy on 02/06/2015 21:02:00:

what are they made from (main drill body) and can they be ground for steel?

.

what are they made from (main drill body) ? ... Non-descript steel [approximating Cheese]

can they be ground for steel? ... Geometry, Yes ... Durable edge, No

Ady102/06/2015 22:00:09
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I've ground the carbide tip for doing stainless steel.

The main body appeared to be ordinary steel on my cheapo masonry drills

Drilled it using the backgear, less heat

12-inch-caliper.jpg

John Haine02/06/2015 22:01:09
3428 forum posts
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The tip is tungsten carbide and can be ground to a sort of point for steel I understand. I think some sort of 4 facet grind would work. I can't remember where I saw this but could be useful if you have something too hard for a normal drill.

Michael Gilligan02/06/2015 22:03:26
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Posted by fizzy on 02/06/2015 21:02:00:
(main drill body)

David Colwill02/06/2015 22:06:14
679 forum posts
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The body of the drill varies according to quality, the better ones are made from a tough steel and the cheap ones from cream cheese. I have used this dodge on more than one occasion, usually involving a steel of unknown origin that has work hardened to the point that HSS won't touch it. I can sharpen drills by hand ( after a fashion ) and the technique I use for sharpening is to present the masonry drill in exactly the same way I would with an ordinary drill. I should point out that I have only used these drills for opening out holes already drilled. Also the carbide tips are very small and prone to breaking. I only really use this as a last resort.

Regards.

David.

Capstan Speaking02/06/2015 22:07:49
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Definitely do-able if you can't buy a proper t.c. drill.

Grind the negative rake off the end. Even then the "top rake" is an unhelpful 90 degrees.

The tip is soft-soldered in so the slightest heat and it's gone.

Bob Brown 102/06/2015 22:27:42
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You can buy masonry bit that have a ground edge to drill a variety of materials including steel see **LINK**

To quote "High performance bits with multiple diamond-ground carbide tips.
Suitable for masonry, wood, aluminium, structural steel, plastic, concrete B35 and multi-layer materials such as tile on concrete."

I've used them to drill though aluminium then into brick also wood into brick/concrete block.

Bob

Edited By Bob Brown 1 on 02/06/2015 22:29:37

Vic02/06/2015 22:37:26
2645 forum posts
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If you need to open up a hole in tough material you can use a Glass drill as it is, the leaf shape works quite well.

JasonB03/06/2015 08:48:19
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Couple of pics of some commercial TCT twistdrills I have to give you an idea of how to grind, tips are brazed like most masonary drills so will stay put. Looks to hace a 4 facet type grind with a very shallow angle to the first edge .

 

hpim1531.jpghpim1532.jpg

hpim1534.jpg

hpim1535.jpg

 

Edited By JasonB on 03/06/2015 10:05:46

Gordon W03/06/2015 08:51:10
2011 forum posts

Masonry drill quality is very variable, all the decent ones I have the tips are brazed on. Sharpening is quite easy, just a sort of 4 facet spade drill. Cheap diamond disc in angle grinder is the easiest and cheapest way, touch up on green grit wheel. I've done this mostly when drilling in multi-media jobs.

Jon Gibbs03/06/2015 09:05:39
739 forum posts

I've had some success with spear point tile drills if this helps.

The other option is to try something like the Bosch Multi-construction drill bits but these aren't as sharp from my experience.

In both cases high drilling pressures are needed.

Jon

Danny M2Z03/06/2015 09:42:04
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Posted by JasonB on 03/06/2015 08:48:19:

Couple of pics of some TCT twistdrills I have to give you an idea of how to grind, tips are brazed like most masonary drills so will stay put.

Nice photo's Jason, I had always wondered if it was worth attacking my brazed tip masonry drill bits with a suitable grinding wheel. Unlike another thread the grinding wheel striations are a part of being a practical bloke. I bet the hole won't mind

* Danny M *

John Stevenson03/06/2015 09:58:48
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Posted by Danny M2Z on 03/06/2015 09:42:04:

Unlike another thread the grinding wheel striations are a part of being a practical bloke. I bet the hole won't mind

* Danny M *

.

LOL wink

Ground quite a few up to get John out of trouble.

Diamond wheel and grind 4 facet, they work fine but don't expect H7 tolerance.

Try to use a decent drill, anything that has a chrome shank is suspect.

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