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Regulator

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david homer21/03/2015 10:46:24
35 forum posts

Hi

Has anyone made and is using a Gordon Smith ball and spring type steam regulator

David

Neil Wyatt23/03/2015 16:29:34
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Moderator
18899 forum posts
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80 articles

>bump<

david homer26/03/2015 09:46:55
35 forum posts

What type of regulator does anyone use, disc Stoudley type, disc in a tube, needle valve in a tube and what are the merits and advantages or disadvantages of each type.

David

John Baguley26/03/2015 10:00:06
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494 forum posts
51 photos

My favourite is the screw (needle valve) type, preferably with a PTFE type material for the seat. Seals 100% and a nice smooth and gradual opening. Made quite a few and never had any problems with them.

I personally hate any rotating disc type regulator as it's virtually impossible to get them to seal against a hydraulic test and not easy to get them to seal against ordinary steam pressure.

John

IanT26/03/2015 15:40:36
1946 forum posts
194 photos

I'll go along with John on this.

I have a 2.5" GNR Atlantic (reputedly built by Peter Dupen and his brother before the war) and it has a disk-type regulator that is giving me grief. As a 'vintage' engine - I don't want to do too much to alter it but I've been very tempted to do so.

Regards,

IanT

PS It's a disk in a tube type by the way...

Edited By IanT on 26/03/2015 15:42:34

fizzy26/03/2015 18:40:57
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1836 forum posts
120 photos

I use plumber ball valves - very cheap and reliable

david homer26/03/2015 21:58:47
35 forum posts

Hi guys, thanks for the replies.

John could I ask how far you have to rotate the spindle to get a reasonable flow, I expect you are using a coarse thread.

David

John Baguley27/03/2015 00:15:22
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494 forum posts
51 photos

Hi David,

I use the largest diameter Whitworth thread that I can fit in. I find that 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn gives ample opening for normal running. It's surprising how little an opening of the regulator you actually need.

John

John Baguley27/03/2015 00:31:12
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494 forum posts
51 photos

Here's one I made for my 2½" gauge Helen Long:

346.jpg

347.jpg

If I remember correctly, the thread on that is 3/8" Whit. The seat is bearing grade PEEK which contains PTFE and Graphite. The spring was supposed to take up any backlash in the thread but proved to be unnecessary,

I made a couple of smaller ones for two Tich's that used 5/16" Whit threads.

As Fizzy says though, ball (gas) valves are very good if you have the room to fit one. Just make sure it is rated for the pressure and the temperature.

John

Edited By John Baguley on 27/03/2015 00:36:50

duncan webster29/03/2015 17:31:20
3710 forum posts
69 photos

Could John Baguley be persuaded to post drawing of his Tich regulator, save me dreaming up my own?

John Alexander Stewart03/04/2015 12:47:00
821 forum posts
56 photos

My little Tich has the same type of regulator as John Baguley's posting shows above. It's been what must be getting close to 30 years now since I made it, and it has been problem-free.

I believe that the thread was 1/4-20 UNC, and the end of the spindle was about a 45 degree taper, but that's from memory. The 1/4-20 thread was the coursest thread I could find in my taps and die collection.

The regulator has been problem free.

Just another thumbs up for that design.

david homer03/04/2015 14:11:32
35 forum posts

Hi guys

Thanks for the postings, all very good information, one question I have if anyone can answer it is the quantity of steam I could pass through one of that design. I am building a 3 cylinder 5" gauge Royal Scot, Martin Evans design, the regulator he shows is a sliding plate on the top of the regulator body, the body is shown with 2 x 5/16 holes so my concern is whether I could get sufficient steam through a screw type regulator.


duncan webster03/04/2015 17:43:43
3710 forum posts
69 photos

2 off 5/16 holes is huge, you will get away with a lot less

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/flow-velocity-steam-pipes-d_386.html gives recommended speed for high pressure saturated steam, work it out from there.

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