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Don't try this at home - a t-slotted slide for mini-lathes

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Don't Do This at Home - A T-slotted Slide for a Mini Lathe

Don't Do This at Home - A T-slotted Slide for a Mini Lathe

Please be warned, this article involves scenes of severe cruelty to a small lathe, and set-ups that are decidedly risky. The author produced the subject of the article many years ago and has since learned how lucky he was to get away with it... Right-click and 'view image' to see bigger pictures and plans.

Neil Wyatt05/02/2015 21:03:07
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This links to a full length illustrated article. It has been edited to remove some photos showing setups that are just too dodgy to repeat. My only excuse is that I still had a lot to learn...

T-slotted table

Neil

Harry Wilkes05/02/2015 21:23:03
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Neil

"My only excuse is that I still had a lot to learn..." does that include working links wink

Neil Wyatt05/02/2015 21:42:18
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Ha! I had set the publish date of the article to 6 February.... problem is that as a moderator I can see published articles!

Should be viewable now

Neil

Danny M2Z06/02/2015 03:47:27
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727 forum posts
276 photos

Thanks for posting this Neil. I do have a little X2 mill which should help a bit with the flycutting and T-slots.

Your drawings saved me a bit of measuring though I shall make smaller T-slots as you alluded to.

* Danny M *

Vic06/02/2015 05:59:07
2019 forum posts
10 photos

Hat well and truly off to you Neil. Very ambitious project considering the tools available but a good result nonetheless.

Thor06/02/2015 07:20:17
1049 forum posts
23 photos

Impressive work Neil, especially when considering you made it on a Mini-Lathe. I have made a new top slide for my Compact 8, but I did use a Mini-Mill, made things a lot easier.

Thor

Jesse Hancock 106/02/2015 08:30:38
314 forum posts

I like the warts and all approach to this article. To admit your mistakes is to admit you're human. Well done Neil.

Jesse.

jason udall06/02/2015 08:42:11
2005 forum posts
41 photos
Brilliant. .the hoops jumped through ..but good demonstration of how we can make parts to an "adequate" accuracy.

One thing..couldn't you have made it in two parts (each say at the limit of machining throw)..and then join the two halves...dowels and loctite?.
jason udall06/02/2015 08:45:26
2005 forum posts
41 photos
Just read " adequate."...
No slight implied..
But I guess it might be seen..apologies. .
If at the limit of measurements, then thats as good as possible.
Russell Eberhardt06/02/2015 10:26:45
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2432 forum posts
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Excellent article Neil. I would be too embarrassed to publish some of my earliest projects. Fortunately I didn't photograph them smiley

Russell.

Ady106/02/2015 10:41:24
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3462 forum posts
513 photos

I would be too embarrassed to publish some of my earliest projects. Fortunately I didn't photograph them

I put my guffy stuff up in here so that fellow hackers on the long road to ME nirvana can see that they're not alone in this world

As far as huge lumps of outsize iron like Neils are concerned I got a shaper to deal with that stuff, much easier and safer

This bit of rear lorry leaf spring was 9 x 1 x 4 and banana shaped before the shaper dealt with it

adscf1059.jpg

Edited By Ady1 on 06/02/2015 10:48:27

Peter G. Shaw06/02/2015 11:19:00
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Might I make a comment about warts and all articles.

Although we all like to think we are able to produce first class jobs first time every time, the reality is that a lot of us cannot because a) we may not have the experience to do it; b) we may not know how to do it; and c) it may be more than our equipment (and ourselves) can do. Furthermore, we must realise that even the experts started at rock bottom and will have made mistakes.

I actually think that articles which include notes on cockups, the realization that a different way would be better, poor finish etc probably do more to encourage beginners and those struggling to achieve better results, than some of the "perfect" articles that do tend to appear.

To give an example, some time ago, I had an article published. Ok it looked reasonable, but only because the paint masked the poor finish! Now it seems to me, that really I should have shown both the unfinished ugly article as well as the finished, painted article.

So please, let's have more articles showing cockups, mistakes, and how to recover from them. After all, is there any real shame in filling an unfortunate gouge with something like Milliput and then paint? Because, lets face it, that's what we do when decorating the house, isn't it.

Regards,

Peter G. Shaw

Ian S C06/02/2015 11:32:05
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7304 forum posts
228 photos

Even the big time manufacturers have to fill in dings, as well as the blow holes in castings, some one on here did say how much solder filler was allowed for on RR car bodies.

Ian S C

Gordon W06/02/2015 11:37:57
2011 forum posts

Thick red-oxide primer has improved my welding no end.

Michael Gilligan06/02/2015 11:48:43
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12943 forum posts
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Posted by Peter G. Shaw on 06/02/2015 11:19:

After all, is there any real shame in filling an unfortunate gouge with something like Milliput and then paint? Because, lets face it, that's what we do when decorating the house, isn't it.

.

Quite right, Peter

... and it's worth remembering what some machine-tool castings look like, underneath the 'Primer'.

MichaelG.

Howard Lewis06/02/2015 13:06:51
1884 forum posts
2 photos

After doing some electric welding, I am always grateful for the Angle Grinder to smooth it done, and remove the ugly lumps!

Howard

Neil Wyatt06/02/2015 15:39:38
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15843 forum posts
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It's always rewarding to know people appreciate what you have done badly

In truth, when the first dovetail came out with no detectable join, I thought 'well that was easy, I wonder why other people don't do it that way. After three or four failed attempts to duplicate the feat, I had to accept it as beginner's luck and accept what I had before the dovetails became too wide.

I am surprised that no-one markets such a cross slide for mini-lathes.

Neil

OuBallie06/02/2015 18:00:05
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1131 forum posts
659 photos

Neil,

Well done using that small lathe! Swinging that lump of CI made my eyes pop.

However, I think you should publish the photos you decided to remove, stating quite clearly why the set-ups are iffy.

Newcomers to the hobby need to be shown just what constitutes a dodgy/dangerous set-up to forewarn them NOT to do so, and that no doubt applies to some of us hobby oldies as well.

It may well prevent someone from doing a nasty to themselves and/or whoever is with them, apart from ruining a part.

It behoves us 'learned hobbiests' to pass on our experience/s, good and bad, for the benefit of others especially those new to the hobby.

I remember my first "Oh sh1t" moment using my V10P, when the long bar sticking out the end of the spindle decided to flail everything it could reach. That was a lesson never forgotten, as was leaving the chuck key in place and it went whizzing past my ear. Another lesson learned.

Geoff - been back in the Workshop this week at last.

Neil Wyatt06/02/2015 19:10:31
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I can't find the worst. It showed the 1x3x6 block screwed to the faceplate by the 1x6 face with two M6 screws...

Neil

Michael Gilligan06/02/2015 19:37:39
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12943 forum posts
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Posted by Neil Wyatt on 06/02/2015 19:10:31:

I can't find the worst. It showed the 1x3x6 block screwed to the faceplate by the 1x6 face with two M6 screws...

.

Should probably have used 0BA. devil

MichaelG.

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