By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Compressor oil.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Nick_G05/02/2015 14:40:37
avatar
1808 forum posts
744 photos

.

I have a newish compressor. It's obviously of far eastern origin and I have seen the same one several times just with different branding on. (this one is branded Michelin)

I 'think' it's this one :- **LINK**

The original documentation that came with it stated that the original oil should be replaced after about 2 hours of 'running in' with one of ???? grade.

But I cannot find that documentation. Has anybody any idea what oil would be suitable.

Cheers, Nick

Jens Eirik Skogstad05/02/2015 14:53:00
avatar
400 forum posts
22 photos
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFS5NDQg8hg
 
 

Edited By Jens Eirik Skogstad on 05/02/2015 14:54:30

Jens Eirik Skogstad05/02/2015 14:54:49
avatar
400 forum posts
22 photos

http://www.shell.com/global/products-services/solutions-for-businesses/lubes/products/types-oils-lubricants/compressor-oils.html

JasonB05/02/2015 14:58:35
avatar
Moderator
21999 forum posts
2539 photos
1 articles

Pop down your local Machine Mart and get a 1lts or 5lts can, its got "compressor oil" on the lable

Neil Wyatt05/02/2015 15:10:21
avatar
Moderator
18894 forum posts
734 photos
80 articles

Sorry to hijack, but as the question has been answered, what sort of spec of compressor do folks use in their workshops? More to the point, what sort of compressor would suit the average user (i.e. one suitable for paint spraying and occassional light use for some air tools (say pumping up a tyre or a pneumatic wrench, not running an angle grinder or air hammer 24/7)?

Neil

JasonB05/02/2015 15:26:08
avatar
Moderator
21999 forum posts
2539 photos
1 articles

The one Nick linked to would do that sort of thing like tyres or a cleaning blower. But if you want to use it a bit more often or run rotary tools then its worth thinking of a larger one as they run a bit quieter and only need to fill the tank occasionally.

I have used one that size with a 1/2" drive impact wrench but its running nearly all the time so better off with something around the 8cfm FAD size or more

Nick_G05/02/2015 15:34:17
avatar
1808 forum posts
744 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 05/02/2015 15:10:21:

Sorry to hijack,

Neil

.

You ain't as far as I can see. It's related and anything that promotes forum activity has got to be a good thing for the site / community. ....................... Right.?

Nick

Nick_G05/02/2015 15:35:12
avatar
1808 forum posts
744 photos
Posted by JasonB on 05/02/2015 14:58:35:

its got "compressor oil" on the lable

I suppose that would be considered a good clue. laugh

Nick

pgk pgk05/02/2015 15:35:17
2425 forum posts
293 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 05/02/2015 15:10:21:

Sorry to hijack, but as the question has been answered, what sort of spec of compressor do folks use in their workshops? More to the point, what sort of compressor would suit the average user (i.e. one suitable for paint spraying and occassional light use for some air tools (say pumping up a tyre or a pneumatic wrench, not running an angle grinder or air hammer 24/7)?

Neil

I bought one of the lidl 'parkside' compressors when I bought this farm. It was cheap enough (under £100) and quite apart from being invaluable for tractor tyre repairs, blowing out the chainsaw and running sanders and rust scalers it's small enough to park in the shed and blow rubbish off the mill and lathe. The tank's big enough that once it's filled itself I can turn it off and have enough air stored for swarfing ( switch on compressor, fire up laptop, light woodburner,put aay last night tools, switch off compressor). I;ve never used it for spraying but have no doubt that the right gun would be fine

martin perman05/02/2015 15:37:05
avatar
2030 forum posts
86 photos

I use a 7.5 cfm compressor for driving small tools, an orbital sander, air gun, die grinder, snips, hammer gun and a nail gun for taking paint off of castings which does use up the air but I supplement this with a truck brake tank which extends the running time and also takes longer to fill but it doesn't bother me as its not regularly used, not used it for spraying yet.

Martin P

Gordon W05/02/2015 16:12:55
2011 forum posts

I have a cheap (sub £100 ) one, it does most things well enough. I don't think they are good for spraying paint, maybe with oil and water traps fitted they would be OK. Good for oil , creosote etc. I have run air tools such as wrench and hacksaw but the motor is going most of the time. If I was starting out from scratch I would get a big one and use a lot of air tools.

mechman4805/02/2015 16:13:21
avatar
2938 forum posts
466 photos

I use a 7.5 cfm compressor from Machine Mart (bought on VAT free day, usual disclaimer ) for general use, one of my intentions is to rig it up for mist coolant system that I've got in mind for the mill & lathe plus a take off for running little oscillators, Stuarts etc. .. when I get round to starting them.. had the kits for over a year now, just never got round to starting them... blush .. ho hum!

The one I have... **LINK**

A bit in the noisy side but does what I want it to.

George.

Bob Brown 105/02/2015 16:13:23
avatar
1021 forum posts
127 photos

Compressors are inefficient as most of the energy put in comes out as heat, as far as spec for a workshop, it comes down to what it is going to be used for. I have a 2.5hp belt driven machine which is a lot quieter than the direct drive machines although still not what one would call quiet. It will do all of the jobs I need it for but may be a little small for a large spray job or any serious sand blasting.

Bob

Clive Hartland05/02/2015 17:02:52
avatar
2758 forum posts
40 photos

The small compressor we have at work has the entry in the handbook, use ASE 30 oil, which to me sounds like normal engine oil. Makes a lot of condensation so needs regular blow out from the valve at the bottom of tank. If you do not blow down regularly the quick detach couplings soon fail as does the pressure switch.

Clive

Rik Shaw05/02/2015 17:31:25
avatar
1469 forum posts
398 photos

I have an ALDI special branded PowerCraft. 2.5hp and 25litre capacity compressor which I use mainly for blowing out work after machining. The handbook recommends changing the oil after 50 hours operation but although the machine is around two years old I am still in the "I'll get round to it sometime" phase. Recommended oil is SAE 15W/40.

I have used it for sandblasting stuff - again with ALDI kit - and although it made the thing wheeze a bit, it coped.

It's noisy but I'm married so it doesn't bother me!

Rik

oldvelo05/02/2015 19:08:01
280 forum posts
54 photos

Hi

Go with a synthetic oil for your compressor for the best performance and protection.

A bit more expensive than a straight mineral oil.

Stay clear of motor oils for as there is no benefit in using a multigrade detergent oil.

Eric

martin perman05/02/2015 19:55:24
avatar
2030 forum posts
86 photos

Several years ago I was given an old industrial compressor and tank powered by a 3ph 3hp motor, I acquired a single phase 3hp motor and fitted it and set it all up and switched it on, the motor was fitted with a centrifugal switch so run up reasonably quickly, no sooner was it running when my wife appeared at the garage door and said that her television had reduced its picture to a little white dot so we went in doors and found the TV working ok, so back to the garage and I started the compressor again to the tune of its doing it again, I never did tell her it was me causing the tv to go awol I just made sure I always had plenty of air and ran the compressor when swmbo wasn't watching her box.wink

 

Martin P

Edited By martin perman on 05/02/2015 19:57:58

Jens Eirik Skogstad05/02/2015 20:59:28
avatar
400 forum posts
22 photos

Nick, after 2 hours running in and compressor oil is renewed, the next compressor oil will be renewed for each 50 hours and check/blow clean or change airfilter under normal maintenance. Empty water from air pressure tank periodically.

Neil Wyatt05/02/2015 21:12:14
avatar
Moderator
18894 forum posts
734 photos
80 articles

Thanks for the thoughts.

John, I know what you mean, but I'm specifically thinking along the lines of an 'under the bench' machine for occasional use to solve a few awkward tasks, not a workhorse.

Neil

Bob Brown 105/02/2015 22:08:58
avatar
1021 forum posts
127 photos

Neil,

May be you are thinking of something like this **LINK** , would be OK for a blow gun and small spray gun/air brush, mist coolant. Critical bit quiet noise level: 68dB.

Bob

Edited By Bob Brown 1 on 05/02/2015 22:11:11

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
walker midge
emcomachinetools
JD Metals
rapid Direct
cowells
Warco
Eccentric July 5 2018
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest