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Speedy Builder509/02/2015 11:59:17
1593 forum posts
109 photos

Question, how do lathes work on a boat?? Levels - do we really need them. If you do use them I suppose the suds drain better.

Nick_G09/02/2015 12:05:17
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1808 forum posts
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Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 09/02/2015 11:59:17:

Question, how do lathes work on a boat?? Levels - do we really need them. If you do use them I suppose the suds drain better.

Because the lathe does not have to actually be level. Just true and square to it's self.

When setting up a lathe on 'dry land' it's easier to deal with a known quantity so to start off level assists the setting up in achieving this.

Nick

Bob Brown 109/02/2015 12:21:13
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966 forum posts
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It has all to do with twist in the bed, it can be at an angle as long as there is no twist in the bed, if there is a twist in the bed it will machine a taper simples.

Ian S C10/02/2015 10:20:59
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7110 forum posts
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The important thing is that the bed is parallel to the spindle, and across the bed is the same angle at the tail stock end as it is at the head stock, it can be useful at times to be level, but not essential, some lathes are sloped quite steeply to the tail stock end to clear swarf and cutting fluid. Wonder if anyone has tried a lathe on the Space Station?idea

Ian S C

mark costello 110/02/2015 17:01:37
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463 forum posts
8 photos

Worked with a chap that was a mmachinist in the U S of A Navy. The lathe He ran was 90' in length. During rough seas He was not allowed to use it as You could watch it flexing during the wave motion.

FIL used to watch W+S #2's being unloaded in the winter by attaching them too electric poles and driving off with the trailer, letting them fall on frozen ground, with no apparent difficulities later.

A w+S #2 He personally ran for years was involved in Anchor Hocking plant fire. The floor burned through and the lathe fell into the basement. After the fire was put out the lathe was pulled out and sent out and rebuilt used many years after that.

Swarf, Mostly!21/03/2015 11:15:08
454 forum posts
41 photos

Good morning,

I guess this post is really (but not exclusively) addressed to Clive:

Following my post dated 9th February, I've bought a replacement vial for the Rabone level, together with 750 gms of plaster of Paris.

Having disposed of some other tasks, I'm ready to fit the vial to the inner metal tube. I have two questions:

The vial I have bought has a pip at one end and you (Clive) advised keeping the plaster of Paris clear of the pip - space is kind of short in there and visibility is restricted, please can you offer any tips regarding this aspect of the job? (I did toy with the idea of putting a bit of bicycle valve rubber over the pip but the pip isn't big enough for that.)

I anticipate needing about a teaspoonful of plaster for each end of the vial and would like to minimise waste. Mixing a small quantity seems more tricky than mixing a large amount, do you have any tips for this?

I understand that I need to thoroughly clean the inside of the metal tube as any traces of old plaster will accelerate the setting of the new.

I'll take some photos when I actually start the job.

Thanks and best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 21/03/2015 11:15:55

Neil Wyatt21/03/2015 11:24:52
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Moderator
14954 forum posts
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Inspired by this thread, I've blagged a precision level from Ar54c Euro Trade as the top prize in a little photo competition.

Take a look in the latest MEW - digital out today, paper one should arrive with subscribers in the next few days.

Neil

> I anticipate needing about a teaspoonful of plaster for each end of the vial and would like to minimise waste. Mixing a small quantity seems more tricky than mixing a large amount, do you have any tips for this?

Now that's what I call economising! Get a tube of Dial flexible filler from B&Q. Although it's flexible it will be plenty firm enough, and you can use as little as you like.

Clive Hartland21/03/2015 11:50:34
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2345 forum posts
38 photos

In answer, OK, the amount of plaster you make up is immaterial as you need a small qty. to use as a sample to see how long it takes to set.

Firstly make up your little piece of foolscap paper like a little concertina which will sit under the bubble and lift it up. This may take a bit of fiddling as it must not be tight fit, just enough to slide the bubble into the tube.

Regards the pip, it is a weak point and if plaster is set around it it can snap off. Basically just clear the plaster from around the pip with about a half mm clear. Use a match stick or similar to place the plaster in place and if you have clearance problems with the pip then perhaps make a space in the end cap. No part of the tube should touch the bubble except where it rests up against the aperture.

Allow time to set and add another 24 hours. Your sample will tell when it is completely set. As to the flexible filler that is a no no as it takes too long to dry and also contracts somewhat.

Clive

Swarf, Mostly!26/03/2015 20:00:00
454 forum posts
41 photos

It's me again!!

Thank you, Clive, for your advice.

I made a trial mix of the plaster of Paris to get a feel for the stuff. I then started the reassembly. Here is a photo of all the parts of the level, including the new vial and the original paper 'pressure pad' :

level parts #02c.jpg

You can see the two end plugs - not a screw thread or grub-screw in sight!

My first step was to insert the vial and the pressure pad into the inner metal tube and position them as accurately as I could with respect to the window aperture. I then secured the vial temporarily with Sellotape, hoping that it wouldn't pull the coloured filling from the vial graduations when removed later.

inner tube plus vial #3c.jpg

Inserting the plaster in the non-pip end was messy but simple. I let that harden for 24 hours. In view of Clive's cautions regarding the pip, I considered and rejected several methods of inserting the plaster in the pip-end. The method I chose was to cut off part of the tip of a disposable plastic pipette (my wife uses them to handle her pond-life microscopy specimens). Here's a photo of a complete pipette and the pruned one I actually used:

pipettes, whole & cut-off..jpg

I positioned the metal tube and vial, end-up, supported by a quartz halogen desk lamp (it was to hand and saved me the bother of going to the workshop for the retort stand and clamp! ). Then, holding the pipette with its cut end over the vial's pip with one hand and holding the pot of plaster with the other hand, I spooned the plaster into the open end of the metal tube (with the other hand wink ). I 'broggled' the plaster down into the tube with one of those wooden coffee stirrer sticks. When I thought I'd inserted enough plaster, I applied a couple of lumps of Plasticene to keep the pipette in position until the plaster had set.

plaster filling (pip end) #1.jpg

The plaster sets in about 20 minutes, I left it for a couple of hours and then fettled the plaster from the rim of the tube end and then removed the pipette. The pipette has raised graduations which the plaster was reluctant to release but perseverance prevailed.

I was eager to see whether I'd adequately protected the pip, here's a photo looking down the open end of the tube, the bright central spot is the pip.

end view - the pip!.jpg

Not the easiest thing to photograph but I think you can see I was fairly successful (except that I've put in too much plaster and it's going to be a b***h to remove the excess) . I have to do that to make room for the end caps.

I'm going to make some sort of a fixture to help press the end caps into the tube with their lugs in line with each other and in correct relation to the window in the tube.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 26/03/2015 20:01:05

Clive Hartland26/03/2015 21:12:00
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2345 forum posts
38 photos

Nice work on the bubble, wait till you have 10 lined up to do like I had in the Base Workshop. Working the Plaster is a bit of an art really but you have the hang of it now so well done.

Clive

Swarf, Mostly!26/03/2015 22:58:31
454 forum posts
41 photos

Hi there, Clive,

Thank you for your encouragement.

Ten-off, well no, but when I do get this one finished I've got a clinometer like Clive's to do. The vial I bought for that has no pip, it's blunt both ends. However, I haven't dismantled it yet so I don't know yet what provisions there are for setting it to zero!

Thanks again and best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

mechman4827/03/2015 08:27:28
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2158 forum posts
357 photos

'FIL used to watch W+S #2's being unloaded'... W+S #2's ..??... abbreviations & acronyms are fine ..if you know what they are..

George.

Andrew Johnston27/03/2015 08:51:04
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4198 forum posts
504 photos
Posted by mechman48 on 27/03/2015 08:27:28:

'FIL used to watch W+S #2's being unloaded'... W+S #2's ..??... abbreviations & acronyms are fine ..if you know what they are..

W+S #2 = Warner & Swasey #2 capstan lathe - by industrial standards one of the smaller capstans, weight about 3000lbs.

Andrew

Neil Wyatt27/03/2015 09:16:25
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Moderator
14954 forum posts
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FIL - Father in Law

Neil

ian j20/11/2017 11:15:39
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237 forum posts
210 photos

I know this is an old thread but I to have a Rabone level the same as yours Swarf Mostly with a broken vial. Can you

remember where you bought your replacement vial from?

I see "**LINK** have one which may be suitable (5895/101 – Ground vial, 58x12mm, sens 0.05mm/m) But at £40 I'm a bit reluctant to chance it. I was wondering if you found a cheaper source ?

 

Thank You Ian

Edited By ian j on 20/11/2017 11:22:47

Edited By ian j on 20/11/2017 11:23:32

Edited By ian j on 20/11/2017 11:24:43

pgk pgk20/11/2017 11:56:01
1186 forum posts
278 photos

Ian, I had a look around the web and found this **LINK**

It may be worth a punt at that sort of price.

pgk

Gary Wooding20/11/2017 13:09:02
477 forum posts
96 photos

Hmm. I interpret the specs as 2mm in 90", or approx. 3minutes of arc, or just over .01" per foot.

Is that accurate enough for levelling a lathe?

Clive Hartland20/11/2017 14:03:47
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2345 forum posts
38 photos

For the purpose it is needed for the reading is of no consequence as you are using it as a comparator when end for ending. I have very seldom used a bubble to measure deflection, as most instruments have a scale anyway.

Clive

Ian P20/11/2017 14:31:53
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1979 forum posts
86 photos
Posted by Clive Hartland on 20/11/2017 14:03:47:

For the purpose it is needed for the reading is of no consequence as you are using it as a comparator when end for ending. I have very seldom used a bubble to measure deflection, as most instruments have a scale anyway.

Clive

I agree its not the reading or a measurement that matters, but the resolution of the indicator does. If the level can only discriminate to 10 thou in a foot then the bed could be twisted 10 thou but you would not know.

I know I'm simplifying things a bit but as far as I see it the use of a precision level to 'measure' the twist in a lathe bed does not have much purpose. Far better to get the lathe level, (or wherever it needs to be that the coolant runs to the drain hole) then adjust the feet or bolting down facility to make the lathe turn parallel.

Ian P

ian j20/11/2017 14:45:37
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237 forum posts
210 photos

Thanks every body. I've found this one :-

**LINK**

which is 45"/2mm so is this .005" per foot? I really don't understand the conversion !!

Thank you

Ian

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