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Cherry's Model Engines

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JasonB05/10/2014 18:46:21
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Well its about time to be thinking about making my list to send off to Santa and I was just wondering if anyone has seen the contents of the new book about Cherry Hill's Models. I did get an invite to the launch at the IMechE in London but did not go so could not have a flick through it there.

Would be interested to know if its mostly pictures of finished models or more detail of how they are made which would be of more interest to me.

J

Edited By JasonB on 05/10/2014 18:46:53

paul rayner05/10/2014 19:53:37
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Hello Jason

looks a very interesting book

I does say in the description-

"It looks at how Cherry developed as a model engineer from a young age, and how she goes about researching, designing, constructing and painting the models. However, there are no details of her machining techniques, which seem to be conventional, but done superbly well. "

hope this helps

regards

paul

Oompa Lumpa05/10/2014 19:59:00
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Jason, it seems to allude in the text there that there is a lack of construction detail:

"However, there are no details of her machining techniques, which seem to be conventional, but done superbly well. "

Shame really as she is very talented but also very driven by all accounts and will not do interviews, citing lack of time. She feels there are certain things she has to accomplish before leaving this world.

graham.

Looks like Paul beat me to it but looks like we both read the same into the text.

Edited By Oompa Lumpa on 05/10/2014 20:00:50

JasonB05/10/2014 19:59:32
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Thanks Paul I had seen that but it does not give an idea of how much of the book covers what subjects, all that could be in a chapter or one chaper each.

There is a shot of some of her jigs but again without a description of what does what they are not so interesting, its fine saying " some of the assorted tooling used on the Blackburn" but if you don't know what those tools were used for they have less meaning.

J

Edited By JasonB on 05/10/2014 20:05:52

Michael Gilligan05/10/2014 20:27:56
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Jason,

Quoted from your link:

148 large format (250 x 250mm) pages. Over 170 illustrations, of which over 120 are superb colour photographs, many full page.

... Methiinks that doesn't leave much room for technical description.

MichaelG.

.

Edit: One, very positive, review on Amazon.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 05/10/2014 20:34:18

Bazyle05/10/2014 21:37:57
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I seem to recall an article in ME that showed her milling something like a con rod out of the middle of a big flat strip about 5 times the size of the part while most people would find a strip close to the width. Perhaps if you value your time highly the material wastage is insignificant and you can concentrate on being precise.

Phil P05/10/2014 23:17:57
802 forum posts
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Jason

I ordered the book last Friday so it might arrive tomorrow, I will let you know what the format is.

By the way, if you look beyond the normal suppliers it can be had for just over £21 inc P&P as opposed to the £30 plus P&P some model engineering book dealers are asking.

Phil

NJH05/10/2014 23:35:21
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Thanks guys

That's my Christmas present from my wife sorted .....and ordered.

I will thus be in a position to give a detailed review at the end of December !

If there is no description of the "How" I'm still happy to view ( and marvel at) the results. To be realistic, with even the greatest degree of description of the processes, there is no way that I could achieve the same. Just as I would not be helped by an explanation of how, say, Monet, produced his paintings I do still get a great deal from seeing the results!

Norman

Neil Wyatt06/10/2014 08:07:22
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I couldn't make the launch either, so all I have to go on is the blurb and the cover (which, in my humble opinion, is rather spoilt by the badly placed rule, which could have been photoshopped out).

It is a shame that Cherry's working practices haven't been documented in the book. ME articles of the past illustrate dummy models made to try things out and a 'perfectionist' approach, but there must be jigs, and fixtures and tiny custom toolbits? The other thing I'd like to know more about is how she gets her finish - much like the gentle satin effect you get with matt varnish (which adds realism to model railways), but how does she achieve this on metal?

Neil

Bazyle06/10/2014 09:35:33
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The ME show demonstrates that there are other people who can produce exceptional quality work. Perhaps some of them would provide articles for the magazine. When they then just say they turn a rod and it comes out with a brilliant finish challenge them to do it on a 50 yr old Drummond to tease out what is due to skill and technique and what is nice machinery.

Neil Wyatt06/10/2014 10:35:13
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I think the real secret is consistency, achieved by patience and willingness to reject anything sub-standard.

I can make beautiful, accurate parts, but not enough to make a complete model!

Neil

Ian S C06/10/2014 10:39:20
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There was an article in ME, probably in the 90s, I seem to remember it was in the form of a Q & A interview.

Ian S C

Mike Poole12/10/2014 22:09:13
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I liked Guy Lautards story of the man who wanted to learn the secret of making the finest rifle barrels. The gunsmith after much persuasion agreed to take him as an apprentice. After months of working the old man had not disclosed the secret. The old man was taken ill and an urgent job came in and the apprentice decided to finish the job, the old man returned in time to check the job, after testing he stamped his name on it. The secret seemed to be to strive for perfection using the methods that were well known but applied with the utmost care and precision.

Most of us use the same equipment, so the precision of the finished items must be down to the care with which we use the tools. The techniques for using equipment from a file to a lathe are well documented but to become skilled in their application practice is required. However it has been my experience that even when I think I have mastered a skill there will always be someone better. Usain Bolt seems pretty quick on his feet but I suspect it won't last forever.

Mike

Chris Vines book on painting models describes the techniques he uses, but the message I got was that much more effort is required than many of us might be willing to apply, he certainly does not shake a rattle can and spray a finished job.

Edited By Michael Poole on 12/10/2014 22:17:49

Marcus Bowman12/10/2014 23:05:50
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I have a copy of this book. In fact I've had it for a fortnight or more, so my pre-ordered copy must have been despatched quickly.

This is a beautiful book, and I am keeping it for my Christmas stocking.

There is a single chapter entitled "How its done" with photos from Cherry's workshop. The rest is a 'coffee table' book, with gorgeous photos of beautiful models. As a long time fan of the lady's work, I'm absolutely delighted with the book. The author has done a fine job; as has the publisher.

Yes; a blow-by-blow exposition, with some of the techniques and tools revealed would have been nice, but that's not really the aim of the book. So, after a heavy lunch with family and relatives, I will leave the others to the tv and chocolates, and slope off to a quiet corner on 25th December, for what I expect to be a joyous celebration of the very best in model engineering skill.

Did I say I like the look of this book...

Marcus

JasonB13/10/2014 07:16:41
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Thanks Marcus, thats what I wanted to know and suspected. Expect it will still find its way down the chimney, just hope I have been a good boyquestion

J

julian atkins13/10/2014 10:08:23
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from what i recall, Cherry Hinds-Hill makes her fiddly intricate parts for her models out of solid but with the part still attached to the rest of the material.... so a part will get fashioned and drilled and tapped etc whilst still attached to the rest of the metal if this makes sense. only when all the work has been completed will that part be cut off leaving just one side to be finished.

cheers,

julian

Phil P13/10/2014 13:00:26
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I thought that method was fairly common, that is what I have always done anyway.

Phil

JasonB13/10/2014 13:28:05
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I have seen similar photos of her using that method, she seems to prefer to cut quite complex parts from the solid where others may go for a silver soldered fabrication. I suppose it all depends on the part in hand and size, with most of her work being 1/12 or 1/16 scale she does not have to start with too big a lump. I like larger models where a part is somethimes better off being welded or soldered but am also happy to carve from the solid. The "casting" I have been fabricating over the last couple of weeks would need a massive slab about 3" x 6" x 11" and be a lot of work to cut from solid without CNC, as it is I'm making it up from about 18 parts.

J

NJH13/10/2014 18:57:41
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As previously posted, I ordered this as a Christmas present from my wife. I opened the parcel, which also contained a couple of books on cookery and houseplants for her, and had only time to view the cover before it was snatched away from me.

Like Marcus, I intend to find a quiet corner after lunch on the 25th and settle down to read it with the (unaccustomed these days) glass of nectar!

I can't wait!

Norman

Phil P14/10/2014 13:13:39
802 forum posts
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My copy of the book arrived as planned, but I did not get to open the packet.

It has been stashed away and will be my Xmas present from the dog believe it or not !!

Phil

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