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Member postings for Swarf, Mostly!

Here is a list of all the postings Swarf, Mostly! has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Geo. H. Thomas Retracting Toolholder - Which ME Issues?
28/08/2012 22:09:00

Hi there, Norman and David,

Thank you for your posts. I did look around for GHT's book but couldn't find a copy on offer for a price within my current limits (my hobby budget is rather overspent at present!). However, I'll keep looking.

As regards your comment, Norman, keeping busy isn't a problem around here these days - the snag is not enough of the business is in the workshop!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

28/08/2012 16:08:58

Hi there, Dias,

That's very helpful, I'm most grateful.

I just found and bought issues 3668 & 3670 on eBid.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Sulphuric acid
28/08/2012 15:32:20

Posted by Clive Hartland on 28/08/2012 14:37:50:

SNIP

by preference I down load to a cast lead gas check bullet of 240gn.Much more accurate and manageable.

Clive

I thought cast lead was for the inside of Synchronome pendulum bobs?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Geo. H. Thomas Retracting Toolholder - Which ME Issues?
28/08/2012 14:22:53

Hi there, all,

I recently bought two back numbers of ME, in order to get the Geo. H. Thomas articles describing his retracting toolholder.

I was told I needed November and December 1981 and bought copies listed with those dates.

This post ought to be sub-titled "First & Third Fridays - I should have remembered that!". I should indeed, I used to own a collection of ME covering 50 years!

So, I have issue 3669 which has Part II of the article, ending with the word 'continued'. I also have issue 3671 which is full of interesting reading but has nothing relating to Geo. H. Thomas' article.

My question is, if I procure issues 3668 and 3670, shall I then have all the description of making the toolholder?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Tools explained
25/08/2012 13:35:27

Not a tool, but ...

Swarf: a floor covering material used to save valuable components and small tools from daylight and discovery.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Sulphuric acid
25/08/2012 12:42:41
Posted by David Littlewood on 24/08/2012 23:11:06:

Neil

Your post made me laugh - but you had the wrong murderer; the acid bath man was John George Haig, hanged for serial murder.

SNIP

A bit off-topic but ...

Back in 1988 I had a spell in hospital in Romford, Essex. The guy in the next bed, retired by then, told me that he had worked in the big sewage treatment works at Beckton, at the end of the Great Northern Outfall sewer. He said that, at the time of the Haig acid murders, the Met Police sent through a request that the workers should keep an eye open for any false teeth or plastic handbags arriving in the sludge lagoons!

Optimistic or what?!!!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: why do I keep snapping drills
20/08/2012 22:50:57

Hi there, Dunc,

I don't know what an SX2 is either but if it's a lathe I presume you're drilling from the tailstock.

Have you made sure that your tailstock is properly in line with your mandrel? (aka headstock spindle)

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Magnetic swarf removers
20/08/2012 15:31:29

Hi there, all,

I've found that a kitchen flour scoop works as a miniature dustpan. I have a few, one aluminium alloy and the others plastic. For other situations a plastic spade (retired from sandcastle/beach duty) does the job.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Dorset newbie questions
20/08/2012 15:18:54

Hi there, Malcolm,

You didn't say which book you've ordered from Amazon.

My personal recommendation would be 'The Amateur's Lathe' by Lawrence (or is it Laurence?) Sparey. It's been republished over and over which is a pretty good vote of confidence. I believe it is still in print but second hand copies are to be had on eBay or Abe Books.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Sash weights.
04/08/2012 16:08:30

Hi there, all,

Many years ago, my neighbours got a new piano. They could neither sell nor give away their previous piano, an upright model, to anyone who would play it so they gave it to me.

The piano had a cast iron frame, mostly of a cross section that would be a good starting point for anyone making an engineer's level. It machines beautifully and I still have a few bits under the bench.

The iron frame was supported on a wooden frame of yellow pine, about 4" x 3" section and without a single knot in it anywhere. I've kept that pine out of the rain for about 40 years (and three house-moves) but recently gave it to a young wood-working enthusiast as I was unlikely to use it.

The board with the tuning pegs was beech - most of that is now the front apron of the woodworking side of my workbench and the jaw of the woodwork vice.

I hope this wasn't too far off-topic, the thread is about recycling!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Myford quick-change gearbox
30/07/2012 10:00:24

Hi there, Mike,

Another thing,

It's quite common for ML7 leadscrews to have that coupling sleeve. I've heard it said that the securing cross-pin acts as a mechanical 'fuse' in case there's a lock-up anywhere.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

30/07/2012 09:57:42

Hi there, Mike,

Check your personal messages.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

28/07/2012 12:22:47

Hi there, Mike,

Mystery solved!

John, thanks for that link. I've browsed the Lathes site a lot but I must have missed that page. I had encountered references to early boxes having unhardened gears but I'd always assumed that the layout of the gear-trains was the same for both early and later boxes.

Thanks again,

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

28/07/2012 09:19:13

Hi there, Mike,

Is your gearbox a 'made in Beeston' box? It would be helpful (and interesting) if you could create an album here and upload a couple of photos to it.

Laurence Sparey designed a Q/C gearbox for the ML7 and drawings for it were sold by the ME Plans service at one time. I've also heard of a gearbox kit being sold by one of the third party accessory firms, can't remember which one. Maybe your box is one of those.

If your box WAS made by Beeston Myford, maybe it is an experimental prototype that 'escaped' from the factory.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Lathe problem
19/07/2012 21:08:20

Hi there, Wolfie,

Is it a flat belt or a vee belt?

Pulleys for flat belt should be 'crowned', that is the centre of the belt path should be a bit bigger than the edges. The belt will always climb to the maximum diameter part of the pulley and stay there, a bit counter-intuitive. Flanges or cheeks on flat belt pulleys don't keep the belt on - the belt will promptly climb over them!

As Paul has written, vee belt pulleys need to be well aligned.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Tools
06/07/2012 09:22:27

Hi there, all,

I have some four-flute drills that I have always understood to be called 'core drills'. I bought one of them quite recently and the seller used that term.

I presumed they got this name because they were/are used for opening up cored holes in castings.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Reaming Brass
28/06/2012 09:41:08

Hi there, Clive,

Please check your PMs (different subject).

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: New "must see" technology
17/06/2012 14:24:27
Posted by David Clark 1 on 17/06/2012 14:18:21:

Hi There

Having worked in a company where they made to 3D models, as setters, we never got to see a drawing.

SNIP

Also, one of the parts I was involved in was surfaced all over. I came in to work one evening (night shift put a lot more money in your pocket at the end of the week) and the day shift chap said "Those components you machined were not flat on the bottom so we skimmed them flat.

They were not meant to be flat, six weeks wasted, still, not my problem.

regards David

Edited By David Clark 1 on 17/06/2012 14:18:42

Hi there, David,

How were those parts held for machining?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: 1-1/8x12tpi thread angle
15/06/2012 09:21:56

Hi there, Ian,

The Myford nose is definitely Whitworth form, i.e. 55 degree angle. It isn't a UNF thread.

Don't get wrongly hung-up about thread tables - threads can be cut with any tpi and any form and any diameter (as long as it's large enough). The thread tables just list threads that have been standardised so that different manufacturers nuts and bolts will be mutually compatible.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Jung Rotary Microtome
14/06/2012 08:19:02

Hi there, Michael,

Have you tried putting your request on any of the Yahoo microscopy related lists?

For example, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amateur_microscopy/

or http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Microscope/

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

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