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Member postings for Swarf, Mostly!

Here is a list of all the postings Swarf, Mostly! has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Die Head Advice
29/03/2014 16:20:41

Hi there, Harry,

Your device looks like a Coventry Die-Head. I believe they were originated by the Alfred Herbert company.

You'll find lots of useful information via Google, for example here's one I just found:

**LINK** but there are lots more.

There's also an eBay seller who occasionally lists copies of a Coventry Die-Head manual though the copy I bought suffers from low contrast diagrams and the scan not encompassing the whole width of the page!

The Coventry Die-Head comes in lots of different sizes but I haven't yet succeeded in identifying the size of the one I have.

You'll also see lots of listings for sets of chasers for the Coventry Die-Head on eBay.

In your second photo, it looks as though the screw is damaged - is that a camera angle problem?

I hope this helps.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: What did you do today? (2014)
18/03/2014 21:23:59

Posted by Oompa Lumpa on 18/03/2014 20:26:38:

SNIP

Under my bench there is a box containing half a dozen hammers of various type, none of which I use. They just don't feel "right".

My opinion only and it may not work for you.

graham.

Not just hammers, it's the same with screwdrivers and spanners and .....

Years ago, I had a matrimonial crisis because my then spouse had, in my absence, given a bean-counter neighbour access to my tool-box!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

18/03/2014 09:05:56

Hi there, all,

A couple of years ago, I attended a meeting where a speaker gave us a lecture on 'The Forensic Use of the Microscope'.

One of the many interesting parts of the lecture concerned helping Trading Standards in the identification of forged honey, i.e. honey blended with some from sources other than those claimed in the label. This was (is?) achieved by identifying the species of pollen grains, using the microscope.

Could that be why the commercial honey manufacturers now filter out the pollen grains?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Parsley sauce .
13/03/2014 08:54:52

Hi there, Michael,

Who was the most helpful person you encountered during your working career?

Was it through a long-term association or through a single, short-term project?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: A Mystery Project
11/03/2014 21:05:19

Hi there, all,

While looking in my workshop for something else, I came across three part-machined castings. Here is a photo:

imagedore gizmo 1001.jpg

and here is the under-side view:

imagedore gizmo 2002.jpg

The thing is, I can't for the life of me remember what these are for! The name 'Dore' is no mystery but these are nothing to do with the Dore-Westbury mill. They must be for some item of workshop equipment but what? And why three?

I did make, and still have, a set of three fly-cutters designed by Mr. Throp of Dore Engineering and these must date from about the same era.

If any member can lighten my darkness, I shall be most grateful.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: electronics
27/02/2014 13:24:51
Posted by Andrew Johnston on 27/02/2014 11:44:06:

SNIP

The best thing you can do with a 555 is put it in the bin. wink 2

Andrew

Hi there, Andrew,

Please explain? What do you have against the ubiquitous 555?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Stripped thread repair advice please
19/02/2014 16:23:05

Hi there, Jon,

I've found that those Woodruf keys can be easily removed using a pair of side-cutters. The problem can be that once they start to come out, they can fly so I'd suggest that you sweep the workshop floor first!

As to repairing the stripped thread, using a Helicoil is going to be a bit expensive for just one hole unless you happen to already have a Helicoil kit for that size (or access to borrow one).

It's possibly worth mentioning here that the illustrated parts lists (aka 'exploded diagrams' ) for the ML7 are all available on the new Myford's web-site. (I wrote 'all' but I couldn't find one for the ML7 counter-shaft clutch.)

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Anecdotes_05 ' In the dark '
17/02/2014 13:31:09
Posted by MICHAEL WILLIAMS on 17/02/2014 11:36:29:
Hi Ian ,

SNIP

Coal isn't the worst offender though - some of the Cornish Tin/Lead/Arsenic/etc mines had very high levels of radioactivity as did some Granite quarries .

SNIP

Regards ,

Michael Williams .

One of the minerals found in the Cornish mines was/is pitchblende, aka uranium ore. It was mined and supplied to glass manufacturers. Despite its black colour (hence the name) it colours the glass a dense yellow.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Has the world gone mad
23/01/2014 10:33:41
Posted by Ian S C on 23/01/2014 10:15:09:

We should be able to soon do the house lighting circuit with low voltage, maybe 6V DC or less if all the lights go LED, that might make for safety. Ian S C

Hi there, Ian,

That sounds OK if you say it quickly. However, when you work out the required cross-sctional-area of copper required to distribute a low voltage supply any distance without excessive voltage drop, it gets less practicable. Copper is expensive and the second-best, aluminium, is tricky to work and to joint.

[I did once tease a Hi-Fi dealer (he was trying to sell me gold-plated loudspeaker cables) that I linked my loudspeakers to my amplifier via the flow and return pipes of the microbore central heating system.]

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Indentfication of Induction Motor
21/01/2014 16:38:00

Hi there, Richard,

I think you'll be very lucky if anyone recognises your motor on looks alone - still, I may be underestimating the Group wisdom and experience.

How much do you know of your motor's history? Did it come to you as a declared 'worker' or is its provenance a complete mystery?

I'm guessing but the hole for the red plug in the terminal box is prpbably tapped with a conduit thread. If it's 3/4" by 16 tpi that suggests the motor is fairly old - not necessarily a show-stopper, the motor on my ML7 lathe was second-hand in 1970 and was OK when I last switched it on. The alternative is the more modern 20 mm metric conduit thread. There might not be very many threads in the thickness of the terminal box tapping so using a thread gauge might be a bit tricky. Probably better to visit your local electrical wholesaler (e.g. TLC or Wades) and buy a 20 mm male conduit fitting as a gauge. If you do eventually decide that the motor is usable, I recommend that you buy a length of flexible plastic conduit plus end-fittings to convey your wiring from the motor terminals to the associated starter & switch-gear. TLC sell an installer's kit but they also sell the conduit by the metre and the fittings by 'each'.

The D-shaped hole in the terminal box lid could be for the cable to a capacitor - is there any sign that a capacitor was ever fitted? If the motor is capacitor start or capacitor start & run, the capacitor is usually fitted within a shroud on the outside of the motor casing. Look for any vacant screw-holes that might have held a capacitor shroud. Of course, your motor might be 'induction start' or 'induction start & run' in which case it won't need a capacitor.

I see that someone has substituted a screw for the woodruff key in the motor shaft, I assume you'll clean that up?

I recommend that you buy one or both of the Workshop Series of books on electric motors in the workshop. They will potentially help you a lot, particularly when it comes to deciding which wires go to which motor terminals. There have also been threads on this forum addressing that subject, you might like to take a photo of the motor terminal panel in preparation for that puzzle.

I'll close with a caution - if you aren't electrically-savvy, ask a friend.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Woman's Logic
11/01/2014 18:57:53

Hi there, Graham,

Once polished, try saxophone lacquer, from your local branch of Boosey & Squawks or any other good music shop!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 11/01/2014 18:58:23

Thread: Need a bit of Motor Advice.
08/01/2014 09:15:51

Posted by Oompa Lumpa on 07/01/2014 21:13:59:

SNIP

Swarfy, very informative. The thing was just completely choked in crud so I have scraped most of it off and I will go over it with a stiff brush before I put it back together.

SNIP.

graham.

Hi there, Graham,

Well, you can imagine how much easier that was to deal with than if all that crud had got inside the motor and choked up the centrifugal switch and got into the bearings, to say nothing of blocking the motor's airways and causing overheating.

If your machine had been used for polishing, maybe the crud was bound with the polishing soap and that made it more tenacious. I'd suggest a wipe over with a rag moistened with white spirit or IPA before repainting and reassembly - you need to remove anything from the motor casing that might act as a thermal insulating coating.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

07/01/2014 17:39:23

Hi there, Graham,

I'm afraid I can't help you with the starter part of your question.

However, I can reassure you about the fan. It will cool the motor as long as you fit the shroud. The stator of the motor is assumed to be in good thermal contact with the casing. There may also be an internal fan that picks up the heat from the rotor and blows it to where it too can be shed to the casing. The fan in your photo then sucks air in through the pretty pattern of holes and blows it out around the motor casing to remove the heat.

I used to have a woodworking machine that had a Brook Gryphon 'totally enclosed fan-cooled motor', similar to yours except that the shroud was plastic. That type of motor is good where there's lots of light stuff like sawdust or grinding dust that wouldn't do any good if it could get into the innards of the motor.

The rating plate of your motor may even bear the description 'totally enclosed fan-cooled'.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 07/01/2014 17:41:38

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 07/01/2014 17:42:03

Thread: Could someone ID this for me please
27/11/2013 21:38:24

Hi there,

This type of toolpost comes in several different sizes, each with its own designation letter/number identity.

J&L/MSC used to give a table of dimensions in their big paper catalogue, I think it was in the early pages of the 'tool-holding' section.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Single Phase Switch Wiring for lathe
24/11/2013 19:18:49

Hi there, Norman and Eric,

Norman, the devices shown in the TLC page to which you link are three-phase devices, not the single phase device to which I referred in my post. 'MEM' + 'DOL' isn't the same as 'MEMDOL' (maybe I should have spelt it 'Memdol'? ).

Eric, I think you've misunderstood my post. The starter I have IS a dedicated single phase device - strapping overload coils in series doesn't come into it.

I'll try to take a couple of photos of the device I have and add them to my albums sometime this coming week.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 24/11/2013 19:19:32

24/11/2013 14:56:07

Hi there, Mike,

On my ML7, I have a Dewhurst switch backed-up with a gizmo called a 'MEMDOL', the 'MEM'stands for 'Midland Electrical Manufacturing' while the 'DOL' stands for 'Direct-on-Line'.

When I was setting up my workshop in the early 1970s, the MEMDOL was the only single phase motor starter I could find. They were available in several flavours and mine combines the thermal overload protection with a zero-volt release. The common use of the three-phase starter on single phase with two channels of the overload connected in series struck me as inelegant and still does! The MEMDOL has served me well and definitely justified my small effort to seek it out.

I'm writing this without having done a Google search to see if the MEMDOL is still available, it does deserve to be!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Citenco Motor
21/11/2013 14:07:26

Hi there, Michael,

I have a motor that I think is of the type you mention.

However, I'm currently confined to barracks with a lurgi so I can't get to the workshop.

If you haven't heard from me in a week, send me a PM to jog my memory.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Decent vernier height gauges ?
14/11/2013 19:44:23
Hi there,
Chesterman are a good old British make. However, if you buy one, make sure that it comes with the scriber and clamp - they are as rare as hens teeth!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!
Thread: Is it zinc or aluminium?
09/11/2013 22:48:20

Hi there, all,

You can determine the specific gravity of an object using just a rigid rod, three bits of string, a counter-weight, a measuring tape and a bucket of water.

Suspend the rod by roughly the centre using one piece of string, hang the counter-weight on one end and the object from close to the other end using the other two pieces of string. Arrange the object, counter-weight and 'centre' suspension positions until the system is in balance. Measure the two spacings between the suspensions of the object, the counter-weight and the main suspension point.

Then lower the system so that the object is freely immersed in the bucket of water and not trapping any air bubbles - adjust one but not both suspensions to restore balance. (It's best if you only move the object, you'll have to move it further from the main suspension - leave the counter-weight position unchanged wrt the main suspension.)  Measure and note the new inter-suspension distances. The object will have 'lost' the weight of its volume of water.

By a bit of algebra, the specific gravity of the object can be calculated (I'd describe the details of the calculation here but it's a bit too close to bed-time!).

Look up the specific gravity in the reference books or on the Internet to get a pretty reliable clue as to the metal's identity.

This method may sound a bit Heath-Robinson but it's certainly capable of distinguishing between aluminium (alloy) and zinc or die-casting metal.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 09/11/2013 22:51:26

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 09/11/2013 22:52:40

Thread: Cleaning and Servicing a Myford M type 3 1/2"
09/11/2013 22:32:05

Hi there, all,

Why is there so much mystique associated with H32 oil (e.g. Esso Nuto)?

Just about all the major oil companies make H32 oil. It's a hydraulic oil and is what farmers use in the hydraulic systems that power the gizmos on the back of their tractors. Farmers don't like paying over the odds for anything (no disrespect intended - neither do I) so the best place to buy H32 is from your local agricultural engineers (see the Yellow Pages).

That's what I did and I got 4½ litres for the same price as many eBay suppliers charge for ½ a litre.

Don't let its being a hydraulic oil put you off using it in your lathe where Beeston Myford specified its use - Myford knew what they were doing!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

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