By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Member postings for Swarf, Mostly!

Here is a list of all the postings Swarf, Mostly! has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Need a bit of Motor Advice.
08/01/2014 09:15:51

Posted by Oompa Lumpa on 07/01/2014 21:13:59:

SNIP

Swarfy, very informative. The thing was just completely choked in crud so I have scraped most of it off and I will go over it with a stiff brush before I put it back together.

SNIP.

graham.

Hi there, Graham,

Well, you can imagine how much easier that was to deal with than if all that crud had got inside the motor and choked up the centrifugal switch and got into the bearings, to say nothing of blocking the motor's airways and causing overheating.

If your machine had been used for polishing, maybe the crud was bound with the polishing soap and that made it more tenacious. I'd suggest a wipe over with a rag moistened with white spirit or IPA before repainting and reassembly - you need to remove anything from the motor casing that might act as a thermal insulating coating.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

07/01/2014 17:39:23

Hi there, Graham,

I'm afraid I can't help you with the starter part of your question.

However, I can reassure you about the fan. It will cool the motor as long as you fit the shroud. The stator of the motor is assumed to be in good thermal contact with the casing. There may also be an internal fan that picks up the heat from the rotor and blows it to where it too can be shed to the casing. The fan in your photo then sucks air in through the pretty pattern of holes and blows it out around the motor casing to remove the heat.

I used to have a woodworking machine that had a Brook Gryphon 'totally enclosed fan-cooled motor', similar to yours except that the shroud was plastic. That type of motor is good where there's lots of light stuff like sawdust or grinding dust that wouldn't do any good if it could get into the innards of the motor.

The rating plate of your motor may even bear the description 'totally enclosed fan-cooled'.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 07/01/2014 17:41:38

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 07/01/2014 17:42:03

Thread: Could someone ID this for me please
27/11/2013 21:38:24

Hi there,

This type of toolpost comes in several different sizes, each with its own designation letter/number identity.

J&L/MSC used to give a table of dimensions in their big paper catalogue, I think it was in the early pages of the 'tool-holding' section.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Single Phase Switch Wiring for lathe
24/11/2013 19:18:49

Hi there, Norman and Eric,

Norman, the devices shown in the TLC page to which you link are three-phase devices, not the single phase device to which I referred in my post. 'MEM' + 'DOL' isn't the same as 'MEMDOL' (maybe I should have spelt it 'Memdol'? ).

Eric, I think you've misunderstood my post. The starter I have IS a dedicated single phase device - strapping overload coils in series doesn't come into it.

I'll try to take a couple of photos of the device I have and add them to my albums sometime this coming week.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 24/11/2013 19:19:32

24/11/2013 14:56:07

Hi there, Mike,

On my ML7, I have a Dewhurst switch backed-up with a gizmo called a 'MEMDOL', the 'MEM'stands for 'Midland Electrical Manufacturing' while the 'DOL' stands for 'Direct-on-Line'.

When I was setting up my workshop in the early 1970s, the MEMDOL was the only single phase motor starter I could find. They were available in several flavours and mine combines the thermal overload protection with a zero-volt release. The common use of the three-phase starter on single phase with two channels of the overload connected in series struck me as inelegant and still does! The MEMDOL has served me well and definitely justified my small effort to seek it out.

I'm writing this without having done a Google search to see if the MEMDOL is still available, it does deserve to be!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Citenco Motor
21/11/2013 14:07:26

Hi there, Michael,

I have a motor that I think is of the type you mention.

However, I'm currently confined to barracks with a lurgi so I can't get to the workshop.

If you haven't heard from me in a week, send me a PM to jog my memory.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Decent vernier height gauges ?
14/11/2013 19:44:23
Hi there,
Chesterman are a good old British make. However, if you buy one, make sure that it comes with the scriber and clamp - they are as rare as hens teeth!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!
Thread: Is it zinc or aluminium?
09/11/2013 22:48:20

Hi there, all,

You can determine the specific gravity of an object using just a rigid rod, three bits of string, a counter-weight, a measuring tape and a bucket of water.

Suspend the rod by roughly the centre using one piece of string, hang the counter-weight on one end and the object from close to the other end using the other two pieces of string. Arrange the object, counter-weight and 'centre' suspension positions until the system is in balance. Measure the two spacings between the suspensions of the object, the counter-weight and the main suspension point.

Then lower the system so that the object is freely immersed in the bucket of water and not trapping any air bubbles - adjust one but not both suspensions to restore balance. (It's best if you only move the object, you'll have to move it further from the main suspension - leave the counter-weight position unchanged wrt the main suspension.)  Measure and note the new inter-suspension distances. The object will have 'lost' the weight of its volume of water.

By a bit of algebra, the specific gravity of the object can be calculated (I'd describe the details of the calculation here but it's a bit too close to bed-time!).

Look up the specific gravity in the reference books or on the Internet to get a pretty reliable clue as to the metal's identity.

This method may sound a bit Heath-Robinson but it's certainly capable of distinguishing between aluminium (alloy) and zinc or die-casting metal.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 09/11/2013 22:51:26

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 09/11/2013 22:52:40

Thread: Cleaning and Servicing a Myford M type 3 1/2"
09/11/2013 22:32:05

Hi there, all,

Why is there so much mystique associated with H32 oil (e.g. Esso Nuto)?

Just about all the major oil companies make H32 oil. It's a hydraulic oil and is what farmers use in the hydraulic systems that power the gizmos on the back of their tractors. Farmers don't like paying over the odds for anything (no disrespect intended - neither do I) so the best place to buy H32 is from your local agricultural engineers (see the Yellow Pages).

That's what I did and I got 4½ litres for the same price as many eBay suppliers charge for ½ a litre.

Don't let its being a hydraulic oil put you off using it in your lathe where Beeston Myford specified its use - Myford knew what they were doing!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Myford ML7? Help in identifying please
19/10/2013 19:05:08
Posted by Stub Mandrel on 19/10/2013 15:58:04:

> I've just made some new runners for some sliding patio doors that are now obsolete - saved me a couple of thousand Euro quoted for replacing the doors!

A job I fully intend to do here - if I can figure out how to get the bloomin' door off!

Neil

Go to Blockbuster Video and get out 'The Italian Job'.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Painting aluminium
05/10/2013 16:51:42

Hi there, all,

Have a look at this web-site:

http://www.onelargeprawn.co.za/2010/02/01/flying-101-kululas-livery-is-factual-quite-funny/

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: anodising service
16/09/2013 21:35:55

Ken,

I don't know about 'ordinary' black anodising but I do know that the process of hard anodising causes aluminium alloy parts to 'grow' a few thou. If your parts are close-fitting, I suggest that you take advice in case you need to allow for this.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Telescoping tubes needed
09/08/2013 22:08:51

Hi there,

A firm of metal merchants, H. Rollett, used to include a range ot telescoping brass tubing in their catalogue. The diameters and wall thicknesses were chosen with telescoping applications in mind. The wall thicknesses were, as I remember it, quite light gauge.

I seem to remember their advertising in Model Engineer years ago but I have no idea whether they are still extant.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Bridgeport lifting eye thread query
01/08/2013 13:36:46

Hi there, Steve,

This one was top of the list when I googled 3/4" BSW eye bolt:

https://www.cromwell.co.uk/TTC6305219F

There were several more potential suppliers. Minimum order values and overseas shipping may be a problem for you, though. Still, it's worth enquiring.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Bandsaw Spares.
21/07/2013 10:33:56

Alan,

I hope that you do find a solution to your bandsaw problem.

When you do, please come back here and tell us how you did it - please don't leave this thread hanging.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Cleaning machines and workshop
02/07/2013 09:13:05

Just a thought:

Has anyone tried centrifuging their swarf to separate the cutting fluid (you know, like the 'big boys' do)?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Chesterman 369 height gauge
25/06/2013 14:26:12

Hi there, Michael & all,

I've solved it! Right click on Michael's link and chose 'copy link location'. Then open a new browser tab, select the url in the url bar and click control + V (i.e. paste). Then increment the url that appears there and click on 'go'. Repeat for the following pages, four in total including the first one.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

25/06/2013 12:28:12

Hi there, Michael,

I got the first page of the Chesterman leaflet OK but Adobe didn't offer me any scope to 'increment the last digit' and I'm not seeing that page in my browser (Firefox) to give access to the URL.

Please can you help me out?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Noob question on scales
17/06/2013 14:59:36

Hi there, Thomas,

You could see a good selection of engines and other models at the Guildford MES annual show on 20th & 21st July.

See http://www.gmes.org.uk/rally.htm for details.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: New workshop - your recommendations
01/05/2013 08:22:12

Hi there, John,

Your outline specification mentions 'felt on roof'.

In my experience, roofing felt isn't what it used to be!

I suggest that you investigate the sort of corrugated iron that comes with a thick layer of insulating foam already bonded to its underside.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
cowbells
TRANSWAVE Converters
Eccentric July 5 2018
Warco
Eccentric Engineering
Meridienne; London MES
Ausee.com.au
ChesterUK
Allendale Electronics
emcomachinetools
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest