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Member postings for Swarf, Mostly!

Here is a list of all the postings Swarf, Mostly! has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: WD40 alternative - any good?
13/06/2014 19:57:42

Hi there, all,

When I was in my 'Amateur Radio' phase, a fellow Radio Club member squirted the wave-change switch of her communications receiver with WD40 - it never worked again!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: What did you do today? (2014)
10/06/2014 09:48:55

Gentlemen,

I'd like to emphasize the reason for my request to John - his visit offers an opportunity for us to get a useful eye witness report (should he agree) as to whether the Chinese are building wind turbines and installing them on their own territory.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

09/06/2014 21:18:38
Posted by John Stevenson on 09/06/2014 15:43:41:

Still over in China.

So far had 15 ceremonial dinners and two full bottles of rice wine. Bastard of a job but someone has to do it and I hope you guys are grateful for the amount of effort I'm putting in on your behalf.

Hi there, John,

Well done and keep up the good work. I hope you remembered to pack the Alka Seltzer!

Assuming you're not being ferried around in a limo with dark windows, I'd be interested in how many wind turbines you see.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: treadle power
04/06/2014 10:46:21

Hi there, Gordon,

I suggest that (among other things) you browse that 'well-known auction site' and study the pictures. You might even encounter some usable kit close to your location.

A work colleague of mine, many years ago, used to support a charity that helped blokes with lower limb disorders. He (George) used to search for and help buy treadle-powered lathes that were loaned-out to the 'patients' for occupational therapy. 'If you don't use it - you lose it!'

He observed that pedalling a treadle lathe motivates the pedaller to learn how to sharpen their tools!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Soft Start For Electric Motor
15/05/2014 07:49:11

Please forgive me if this is a silly question but:

What size motor did Colchester fit to the Student as original equipment?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 15/05/2014 07:49:36

Thread: Myford Super 7 tailstock barrel key
11/05/2014 17:50:50

Hi there, MattK,

The Mytholmroyd Myford web-site shows that the tailstock keys for the Super 7 and the ML7 are different. In fact, they give two separate part numbers for the ML7 key.

I suggest that caution is needed here!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Free sources of materials.?
09/05/2014 20:33:52
Posted by Les Jones 1 on 09/05/2014 09:29:36:

I find the strips of stainless steel used to stiffen windscreen wiper blades very useful.

SNIP

Les.

Hi there, Les,

I too have put in store some of those strips. I intend to use some to make a replacement for the lost gib-strip from my 'every-day' Vernier caliper. That will probably require at least 20 mm - I've no idea what I shall do with the rest!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Antique oil can
29/04/2014 09:19:23

Hi there, all,

Back in the late 1940s, when I was going through my aeromodelling phase, the Valvespout can was popular as a container for the ether/castor oil fuel used for the compression/ignition ('Diesel' ) engines.

I seem to remember that beside the conical model there was also a version with a flattish square body.

The ones I remember had a brass spout - the one in the OP's photos look more like steel. Maybe it's plated?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 29/04/2014 09:19:51

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 29/04/2014 09:20:33

Thread: Toys for Boys
23/04/2014 13:25:23

Ian,

Try spelling it with an upper case 'V', maybe your spell/grammar checker knows it's a name.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: bricking up a garage door for workshop, ideas
22/04/2014 16:14:46
Posted by Bob Brown 1 on 22/04/2014 15:30:06:

SNIP

The panels could be prefabricated on the floor and with a vapour barrier on the outward face,

SNIP

I beg to differ regarding the position of the vapour barrier - I prefer it to be on the 'warm' side of the insulation. If the vapour barrier is on the 'cold' side of the insulation, any water vapour will condense there (when the 'cold' temperature is less than the dew point) and make the insulation damp. If the insulation is glass fibre and gets damp, it ceases to be insulation!

The vapour barrier isn't there to exclude rain - that's the job of the outer shed/garage walls or cladding. The object of the vapour barrier, as I understand it, is to confine any water vapour to the building interior away from the insulation. Water vapour is emitted (transpired) by the occupying Model Engineer (e.g. while testing tap wrenches to destruction! ), by visitors, by boiling kettles and by paraffin-burning heaters and LPG torches.

So, I'd say put the vapour barrier on the inside but provide for good (forced) ventilation. On the latter topic, I recommend a book entitled 'Woods' Practical Guide to Fan Engineering'. It will dispel some of the commonly-held myths about what fans do.

Also, a point about Planning Consent (see posts on the previous page): so-called 'permitted development' provisions, e.g. sheds less than 50 m³, don't apply in 'areas of outstanding natural beauty', conservation areas or National Parks. They also might not apply in 'ordinary' areas if the local Planning Authority have exercised their power to withdraw them.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Mild steel & cast iron
19/04/2014 09:51:35

Hi there, Lee,

Many of the old lathes used a mild steel mandrel running directly in cast iron. Given proper lubrication, they ran for decades (some are still running). The cast iron contains graphite which has lubricating qualities but oil is still necessary.

If your clamping relies on flexing the cast iron one side of the 'bearing', then the fit needs to be very close - if you try to flex the cast iron too much, it'll crack. That's the failure mode of many of the older lathe head-stocks.

I suggest that one ingredient for your scheme to be successful is that you take precautions to exclude dirt and grit from getting into the clearance (small though it may be) between your cast iron and mild steel parts.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Myford ML7 Gearbox
07/04/2014 16:51:23
Posted by Robbo on 07/04/2014 14:35:53:

SteamGeek,

SNIP

Also have a leadscrew which came from a gearbox equipped ML7, so is already shortened, and still has the slot.

Sold the gearbox and the buyer didn't need the leadscrew as he was fitting it to a Super 7.

SNIP

Phil (in Lancs UK)

Hi there, Robbo,

Did your buyer also leave you with the Gear Cover? SteamGeek will need one.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

07/04/2014 14:12:59

Hi there, SteamGeek and Brian,

Just to be clear, both the lead-screws in the photo are full length, un-shortened, as supplied with non-gearbox ML7 lathes. Their tail-stock ends are level with each other.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

07/04/2014 10:48:29

Hi there, again, SteamGeek,

To illustrate the point I made about lead-screw key-slots, here is a photo I found:

lead-screw ends #01.jpg

The upper lead-screw is the early type and the lower one is the later type. You can see from that picture how shortening an early lead-screw loses the key slot.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

07/04/2014 10:30:10

Hi there, SteamGeek,

I have measured the off-cut from my shortened ML7 lead-screw - it is 5/8" diameter.

If your ML7 dates from 1948, does it have the mounting holes for the gear-box in the front shear of the bed?

Brian, in response to your post:

Here is a picture of the Beeston Myford drilling jig for the gear-box mounting holes:

myford qcgb drilling jig #01.jpg

I measured the hole-to-hole centre spacings (by putting suitable drill-shanks in the holes and averaging the external and internal caliper readings to eliminate the drill diameters).  My results are as follows (from left to right):

1.188", 2.560" and 2.624" . (They look fairly close to fractional spacings.)

I am a bit puzzled by Brian's post. The Myford fitting instructions call for the push-screws to be temporarily removed from the lathe bed and their tapped holes to be used to secure the drilling jig. The head-stock casting is held to the bed by the four securing bolts that go in from the top, beneath the mandrel and back-gear cluster. My understanding is that the function of the push-screws is to position the head-stock casting against the rear shear of the bed until those 'in from the top' bolts are inserted and tightened. Once that is done, surely the push-screws have done their job? The gear-box fitting instructions do call for the push-screws to be re-inserted once the gear-box mounting holes have been drilled and tapped - but they do not call for any re-alignment checks on the head-stock & mandrel.

The push-screws may, however, need to be shortened if they protrude from the bed and prevent the gear-box from fully contacting the front shear of the bed.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 07/04/2014 10:32:07

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 07/04/2014 10:34:39

06/04/2014 22:58:40

Hi there, again, SteamGeek,

I forgot to mention that the gear covers for the ML7 and the Super 7 are not the same. The gear back-plate, however, IS the same.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

06/04/2014 22:02:38

Hi there, SteamGeek,

As Robbo says, it's the same gear-box for both ML7 and Super 7.

I'll check for certain tomorrow but I'm fairly sure that the end section of the lead-screw that passes right through the gear-box to pick up the gear-box output on its left-hand side is 5/8" diameter for both ML7 and Super 7 lathes. So you won't need to sleeve for an ML7 fit.

The threaded part of the lead-screw is 5/8" diameter on the ML7 and 3/4" diameter on the Super 7 machines.

What you do need to do is check whether when you remove the gear quadrant and left-hand lead-screw bearing from your ML7, your lead-screw is revealed to have TWO positions for the Woodruff key, early versions only had one. The 'outer' key-slot will be removed when you shorten the lead-screw and the drive gear that picks up the gear-box output uses the 'inner' key-slot. You say that your ML7 dates from 1948 - I'd expect that a lead-screw that old will only have the one key-slot. So you will either need to machine a new key-slot or procure a more recent lead-screw.

The packing strip is not used on the ML7 fit - I think it is required on the Super 7 fit because the effect of the 3/4" diameter lead-screw is to displace the lead-screw axis further from the machine bed than it is on the ML7.

If you look on the web-site of the new proprietors of Myford, you will find the Illustrated Parts Lists (aka 'exploded diagrams' ) for the ML7, including the Quick Change Gear-Box.  Go into 'ML7 spares', select the assembly of the lathe you're interested in, scroll right to the bottom of the page and click on 'larger diagram'.  I haven't looked but I expect the parts lists for the Super 7 are there too.

The Beeston Myford fitting instructions for the gear-box require the lead-screw guard to be shortened to 3⅛". If the lead-screw you eventually fit is of the two-piece type with a collar at the left hand end of the threaded portion, I reckon 3⅛" is still too long by somewhere between ⅛" and ¼". At 3⅛" the end of the lead-screw guard fouls the collar before the carriage reaches the left-hand end of the lathe bed. When you refit the lead-screw guard after shortening, you may need to adjust the half-nut gib-strip - the adjustment studs double as the fixings for the guard! If you're careful, you might be able to remove the 2BA nuts to release the guard without moving the studs. The Beeston Myford fitting instructions don't warn you about that one!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

 

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 06/04/2014 22:02:58

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 06/04/2014 22:03:43

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 06/04/2014 22:06:12

Thread: Imperial fractions on drawings.
03/04/2014 09:07:51

Hi there, all,

When I was in the Trainee Model-Shop as part of the first Factory Attachment of my sandwich course, we were taught that, unless otherwise stated, the tolerance for fractional dimensions was ±1/64" and for decimal dimensions was ±0.005".

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Die Head Advice
30/03/2014 16:32:43

Posted by Harry Wilkes on 29/03/2014 22:20:05:

SNIP

Andrew it is probably a 1/4" diehead it does contain a set of 1/4 x 28 dies

Thanks again

H

Hi there, Harry,

I was going to come back on the size aspect but Nick has largely beaten me to it.

The thing is, as I understand it, that a 5/16" die-head isn't limited to cutting 5/16" threads - with the right chaser set it will cut any thread reasonably within its nominal capacity. But the chaser set has to be compatible with the particular model of die-head.

I suspect that the one I have may also be a 5/16 'CH', I'll have to dig it out and have a hard look at it! Without a positive identification of the model, it would be foolish of me to buy any chaser sets!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

29/03/2014 16:20:41

Hi there, Harry,

Your device looks like a Coventry Die-Head. I believe they were originated by the Alfred Herbert company.

You'll find lots of useful information via Google, for example here's one I just found:

**LINK** but there are lots more.

There's also an eBay seller who occasionally lists copies of a Coventry Die-Head manual though the copy I bought suffers from low contrast diagrams and the scan not encompassing the whole width of the page!

The Coventry Die-Head comes in lots of different sizes but I haven't yet succeeded in identifying the size of the one I have.

You'll also see lots of listings for sets of chasers for the Coventry Die-Head on eBay.

In your second photo, it looks as though the screw is damaged - is that a camera angle problem?

I hope this helps.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

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