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Member postings for Swarf, Mostly!

Here is a list of all the postings Swarf, Mostly! has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Soft floor and lathe...
21/09/2021 13:26:52
Posted by ega on 21/09/2021 13:23:00:
Posted by Swarf, Mostly! on 21/09/2021 10:55:40:

A hint: when filling in a planning application form, NEVER use the term 'workshop'. Doing so will generate in your Planning Officer's mind a mental image of paint overspray, toxic smoke, 24/7 noise and radioactive waste!!!
Far better to use terms like 'garden room for use for hobby and domestic storage purposes'. smiley smiley smiley

The late Gordon Stokes, woodturner, recommended the term "craft studio".

I like it!! smiley smiley smiley smiley smiley smiley

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

21/09/2021 10:55:40

Hi there, all,

My ML7 sits on a home-made cabinet stand of braced sheet steel. Each end of the stand has a length of 1" x 1" angle iron attached at floor level. For about 20 years the stand stood on two lengths of hard felt positioned under the webs of the angle iron. I never had any difficulty truing the bed using an engineer's level.

When I moved to my present lcoation, I had to leave my previous sectional concrete workshop in 'favour' of a proprietary garden 'workshop'. We did mount that on a good level reinforced concrete slab. The workshop stands on a flimsy wooden floor on the concrete. I cut two rectangular apertures in the wooden floor and put down two strips of planed hardwood. No felt this time. Again, the lathe has been easily set true using an engineer's level. Needless to say, my activities are at hobby levels of precision but my results are usually good enough for me.

A hint: when filling in a planning application form, NEVER use the term 'workshop'. Doing so will generate in your Planning Officer's mind a mental image of paint overspray, toxic smoke, 24/7 noise and radioactive waste!!!
Far better to use terms like 'garden room for use for hobby and domestic storage purposes'. smiley smiley smiley

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: A Couple of Questions about Pipe?
17/09/2021 19:41:14

I understand that gas pipe is colloquially referred-to as 'barrel' because the original town gas networks re-used the barrels from Government-surplus musket barrels from the Napoleonic Wars. (Or is this an urban myth? )

So, question #1: is it improper to also refer to water pipe as 'barrel' ?

Question #2: is galvanised water pipe galvanised on its interior as well as its exterior?

Engineering history can be obscure but interesting. For instance, why is the outside diameter of nominal 1½" pipe actually 1 and 29/32 inches?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 17/09/2021 19:42:57

Thread: Threading myth .... busted!
01/09/2021 19:51:11

Hi there,

I can't remember (without logging off and going to consult the relevant books) whether it was Tubal Cain or G.H.Thomas who pointed out that the usual way of angling the tip-slide optimises the finish of the wrong flank of the thread!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Dickson QCTP on a mini lathe
17/08/2021 19:54:22

Hi there, again, Martin,

If you look in the 'tool-holding' section of the on-line MSC catalogue, there are a couple of pages of dimensioned illustrations of the various sizes of Dickson-type QCTP.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

17/08/2021 19:50:41

Hi there, Martin,

I can't answer your query directly but if you look in my albums there's a dimensioned diagram of the bed, cross-slide, top-slide and basic tool-post of the ML7. If I remember correctly, it's 'cribbed' from G.H.Thomas' book.

This might help you work your dimensional analysis from the opposite (i.e. ML7) direction.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Spotting drill size
23/07/2021 15:22:52

Hi there, Bill,

Just my two penneth - I'd say the 'spot' needs to be big enough to at least fully contain the chisel point on the first proper drill you intend to use.

Best5 regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Alternative to Myford Super 7 stand/cabinet?
18/07/2021 20:25:24

Hi there, again,

I should have written 'the right or down arrow keys'.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

18/07/2021 19:20:55
Posted by Robbo on 06/05/2013 14:20:43:

Colin,

SNIP

be needed to ensure the lathe supports/bolt holes are in the correct place. The standard ML8 was 30" between centres, (10" more than the Myford 7 series 20" but there were longer versions ( extra bed lengths were available so it could be made up to 4' plus between centres). I think the cabinet stand was only produced for the standard 30" lathe.

SNIP

Phil

I can't edit out that bloody smiley, wherever it came from!!!!!!

Edited By Robbo on 06/05/2013 14:22:14

Edited By Robbo on 06/05/2013 14:23:07

Hi there, Robbo (and others ),

ALWAYS type a space before any closing bracket. That avoids waking up the smiley gremlin!!

Also, always press the arrow keys to get clear of the other person's text after you've quoted them. That avoids the left-hand margin quote bar also covering your own text.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: New Entry
17/07/2021 13:17:26

Hi there, Martyn,

A good few years ago, I sold a Specto 'Analytic' 16 mm projector to a collector who lived somewhere near Corsham, Wiltshire. He had two hobbies (and a very indulgent wife! ). One hobby was to collect one of every Specto projector, the other to collect one of every communications receiver made by the Hallicrafters Corporation of the USA.

I wonder where his collections are now?!?!

You probably know but I'll state for the interest of other readers: the Specto 'Analytic' projector could be set to project at 16 fps, 2 fps or still. When the last setting was selected, I seem to remember the lamp brighness was reduced.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Back gear and bull wheel for myford ml7
17/07/2021 12:12:13
Posted by Swarf, Mostly! on 18/06/2021 09:49:12:

Hi there, again, Mark,

If you do decide to buy a new bull wheel and back-gear cluster, I suggest the following modification:

Drill a hole (say, 6 mm clearance) through the bull wheel diametrically opposed to the sliding gear segment. (While the bull wheel is off the mandrel this is more convenient than having to disassemble the lathe. If I were to need to remove my lathe mandrel and bull wheel for any reason, I would perform this same modification before reassembly.)

Then cut a length of square bar to span the head-stock casting and fit a 6 mm dowel in such a position that the dowel can be engaged with the hole in the bull wheel with the ends of the bar resting on the front and rear of the head-stock casting.

Should you, for example, need to unstick a stubborn chuck, fit the bar and dowel to the hole in the bull wheel. This will immobilise the mandrel without any excess sress being imposed on the teeth of the bull wheel or back-gear. The torque applied to the chuck will be transferred from the mandrel, via the woodruff key, to the bull wheel, thence to the dowel & bar and then to the head-stock casting.

It might be argued that drilling such a hole in the bull wheel would cause inbalance but I do not think this would be serious in an ML7.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Hi there, all,

Those of you who are familiar with the ML7 will have immediately realised that part of what I wrote, above, is sheer bunkum!! A plain bar will not span the head-stock casting - the bull wheel gets in the way.

However, while I was searching for a new book to read to while away lockdown, what should fall out of the book-case but 'A Man and His Lathe' by Laurence Sparey, published by TEE. Browsing its pages, I found what my memory had half remembered. Here's a scan of part of the relevant page:

sparey c-spanner #01.jpg

My suggestion had the dowel in the bar whereas Mr. Sparey puts his dowel into the hole drilled into the bull wheel. I have to confess I prefer his scheme. The photos in 'A Man and His Lathe' are rather dark so I didn't scan the relevant photo of the C-spanner in action. Does anyone know if the book is still in print?

I apologise for reviving such an old thread but I wanted to correct my error. I am embarrassed by the web-site's rendering of my scan - moderators, please feel free to re-orient and reduce size.

I wonder whether the original poster has solved his problems?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Map Scale mystery
30/06/2021 16:26:10

What's the proper way to get two (or more) quotes into the same post?

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

30/06/2021 16:24:26

Posted by Ady1 on 29/06/2021 23:09:29:

SNIP!

The guys who really impressed me were the early circumnavigators who

1-Didn't hit a rock and sink in uncharted waters or founder, (unparalleled seamanship)

2-Accurately Mapped huge chunks of the coastal globe, both land and sea (high levels of education and ability required)

4-Kept a wooden ship going in tropical waters for years (no mean feat when your ship is made of sugar candy)

3-Got home alive after being bitten and munched by every tropical bug and disease imaginable

It's difficult to comprehend the level of abilities and skills those people possessed, and how tough they were

Edited By Ady1 on 29/06/2021 23:26:20

Also quoted by ADY1:

The tool which made surveying much easier was the Theodolite

Back in the 1970s I went on a few diving holidays in the Isles of Scilly. One year, the Admiralty Hydrographic Department were surveying the area. There were two ships involved - one was HMS Hecate, I can't remember the name of the other.

What impressed me was the sight of a surveyor using his theodolite from a rock you'd have said was only just large enough for the tripod with the surveyor performing contortions to keep his personal centre of gravity vertically over terra firma!! Devotion to duty or what?!?!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Back gear and bull wheel for myford ml7
18/06/2021 09:49:12

Hi there, again, Mark,

If you do decide to buy a new bull wheel and back-gear cluster, I suggest the following modification:

Drill a hole (say, 6 mm clearance) through the bull wheel diametrically opposed to the sliding gear segment. (While the bull wheel is off the mandrel this is more convenient than having to disassemble the lathe. If I were to need to remove my lathe mandrel and bull wheel for any reason, I would perform this same modification before reassembly.)

Then cut a length of square bar to span the head-stock casting and fit a 6 mm dowel in such a position that the dowel can be engaged with the hole in the bull wheel with the ends of the bar resting on the front and rear of the head-stock casting.

Should you, for example, need to unstick a stubborn chuck, fit the bar and dowel to the hole in the bull wheel. This will immobilise the mandrel without any excess sress being imposed on the teeth of the bull wheel or back-gear. The torque applied to the chuck will be transferred from the mandrel, via the woodruff key, to the bull wheel, thence to the dowel & bar and then to the head-stock casting.

It might be argued that drilling such a hole in the bull wheel would cause inbalance but I do not think this would be serious in an ML7.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

17/06/2021 13:35:17

Hi there, Mark,

It all depends on what you regard as huge.

Have a browse on eBay, for instance:

eBay ML7 Bull Wheel

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Slipping ER25 collet and best practice
11/06/2021 09:13:41

Posted by Jason 10/6/21

Are you snapping the collet into the nut correctly before inserting tool and doing it up?

Posted by andrew lyner on 10/06/2021 22:06:02:

SNIP!

The "snapping" could be something that I am missing. There is a slight click but nothing very impressive that I can remember.

SNIP!

Reviewing this thread, it seems to me that this important topic is being glossed over!!!!!!!!!!

My understanding is as follows: the collet should be engaged into the nut while both are OFF THE CHUCK.. Then fit the collet/nut combination onto the body of the chuck and then insert the tool and tighten the nut.

I await comment from others.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: What V belt cross section for use on a standard sized Picador pulley
10/06/2021 13:53:47

Hi there, all,

Working from memory here but offered in good faith:

I believe that 'Picador' pulleys are 'A'-section while 'Z' or 'M' section pulleys from the same stable were branded 'Pelican'.

I have several of each size but they're all in a box several layers down so I can't easily do a physical check!!!!

Sad that they're no longer trading.

One source of Vee-belt info in the old days was the Fenner literature. There was also a book by (I believe) 'Duplex' - I don't know if it is still in print.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Strange mini "turret" lathe?
08/06/2021 14:42:42
Posted by Clive Foster on 08/06/2021 08:26:46:

Michael

SNIP!

A side benefit of driving lessons from my godfather, who claimed to have been trained as a chaffeur by a Rolls Royce, whose mantra was "don't touch the brakes". Pretty much essential if rich bastard in the back is gonna get a smooth ride but also excellent for honing traffic reading and anticipation skills.

Investigation suggested I had about 10 gear changes left before it all went whaooie shape.

Clive

Clive and group,

Many years ago, I drove an Alvis. I had a car repair mentor, 'Charlie', who had previously been an Alvis employee and had gone through the Alvis Chauffeur training school. He told me that during one lesson driving through (I think) Coventry, a young woman had crossed the road in front of them without looking. Charlie hit the anchors and received an admonition along the lines taught by your godfather regarding shaking up the rich guy in the back. In Charlie's case, however, his instructor added the rider: 'besides, never kill crumpet - it's wasteful'.

Not very 'woke' but it was a long time ago!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Thread: Myford extension for spindle.
31/05/2021 20:19:45

Hi there, all,

If you were making (for example ) Harold Hall's ER32 collet chuck to screw on to the ML7 or Super 7 mandrel, it would be useful to have such a facsimile of the mandrel nose to periodically check progress. That assumes that the facsimile is accurate.

It would avoid having to perodically unscrew the lathe chuck, complete with work-piece, and turn it around to try the job on to the actual lathe mandrel.  The same rationale applies to machining a chuck back-plate.

Of course, if one trusted one's skill and measuring equipment, one would machine the job by dead reckoning.

I prefer the facsimile.  One of the Myford ML7/Super 7 accessories is/was such a mandrel nose facsimile on an MT2 taper shank.  I have two but I've never clocked either of them to check their accuracy.

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 31/05/2021 20:22:43

Edited By Swarf, Mostly! on 31/05/2021 20:23:54

Thread: fobco drill
30/05/2021 10:13:44
Posted by Peter Cork 1 on 30/05/2021 09:29:46:

.. sorry, finger trouble there, no sure how that emoticon got in ..

Hi there, Peter,

If you ALWAYS type a space before any closing bracket, the emoji imp will stay asleep!

(This one not just for you) If you ALWAYS press the right arrow key a few times before typing your reply, the quote line will end where it should and not embrace your text too!

Best regards,

Swarf, Mostly!

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