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Member postings for Michael Gilligan

Here is a list of all the postings Michael Gilligan has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Aciera F3
15/09/2019 22:31:15

Try this, Ian

**LINK**

http://www.schaublin.ch/app/webroot/pdf/cat/5.pdf

MichaelG.

Thread: Spiral Flute Tap?
15/09/2019 15:20:02

I will leave you to it, Jason

... It's really not worth debating

MichaelG.

15/09/2019 14:03:06

Jason,

I regret to say that your catalogue clipping further confuses the issue

It illustrates the Modified Bottoming Chamfer, not the Bottoming Chamfer

The 'Chamfer Styles' tab on this page **LINK** does rather better

https://www.mscdirect.com/basicsof/taps

... interestingly; it also distinguishes between 'bottoming' and 'plug' in a way that makes sense, but is, perhaps, uncommon.

[some other sources use those words as US/UK variants]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tap_and_die

MichaelG.

 

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 15/09/2019 14:04:26

15/09/2019 11:13:02
Posted by JasonB on 15/09/2019 10:13:39:

Michael, I have several of these YG-1 general purpose* taps and they show the lead taper, in this cast 2 -3 threads which is not a lot more than may bottom/plug taps particularly if they have a pointed female ctr on the business end so they will thread almost as close to the bottom. [ ... ]

.

Thanks for trying, Jason ... but (a) the Axminster one has a male centre, and (b) 2-3 threads is about double what 'bottoming' taps normally had.

MichaelG.

15/09/2019 09:55:51

Struggling to follow this discussion, and the terminology

I found Axminster's illustration unconvincing as a 'universal' tap: **LINK**

https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-hsse-universal-spiral-flute-taps-ax938282

[ is that really suitable for 'bottoming' or 'plug' use ? ]

.

Then I discovered this document: **LINK**

http://www.ymwtapsusa.com/download/newsletters/Understanding-the-basics-of-spiral-fluted-taps.pdf

... which is very informative, but lists many variations on the theme

I guess the expedient solution must lie somewhere betwixt these extremes !!

MichaelG.

Thread: ACME thread identification question.
14/09/2019 22:46:08

Indeed, Steve yes

That's why I've been banging-on about wanting to know how it was made.

It's of no relevance to me personally ... just an interesting puzzle.

MichaelG.

14/09/2019 22:29:53
Posted by S.D.L. on 14/09/2019 22:09:11:

A lot of leadscrews are cut by thread wirling, The most accurate are ground.

.

Yes, Steve : But the Boxford drawing that Pete posted explicitly states 'Plunge Roll'

MichaelG.

14/09/2019 22:05:29

"In most of these cases its ignorance or expedience."

smiley ... nice summary, Steve.

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/09/2019 22:07:13

14/09/2019 21:19:11
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 14/09/2019 20:32:26:

ACME is standardised in imperial units but the form can be used for metric leads. If you were cutting the thread to a metric lead you'd have to convert the lead to inch pitch then grind the tool nose width appropriately. However, if you were rolling that metric thread you'd have to have a non-standard set of rolls manufactured.

Since the vast majority of the early Boxfords were inch screws I wonder if they had the metric threads cut but the inch ones rolled for cost purposes?

.

< my emboldening >

.

That's what I was wondering, Pete

... hence my hope that someone might know for sure how the metric screws were made.

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/09/2019 21:20:37

Thread: Syil X3 CNC Spindle Failed
14/09/2019 19:14:41
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 14/09/2019 18:20:46:
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 12/09/2019 18:33:29:

Neil.

[ ... ]

Thanks

MichaelG.

They are embedded images, so you can find their origin easily in several ways.

Neil

.

O.K. ... I give up

[ can't find the 'White Flag' smiley ]

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/09/2019 19:15:24

Thread: ACME thread identification question.
14/09/2019 19:07:15
Posted by old mart on 14/09/2019 18:58:08:

Thread rolling is a specialised process, which most firms would sub out to the experts.

.

But why would those experts want to roll an ACME thread-form to Metric dimensions.

True ACME is [to the best of my knowledge] exclusively specified in Imperial units.

... If I am wrong; would someone please tell me

MichaelG.

14/09/2019 19:01:53
Posted by S.D.L. on 14/09/2019 16:52:51:

Halifax Rack and Screw make precision leadscrews, Used to serve the machine tool industry.

I know they will also make Ba$tard sizes as where I work they used to make us a 16mm x metric pitch ACME in stainless steel.

.

Perhaps you could explain then, Steve [please]

Why would anyone choose to specify 16mm x some metric pitch in ACME form rather than Metric Trapezoidal ?

[my brain hurts] ... Is it just to make it difficult for customers to second-source spares ?

MichaelG.

Thread: Picador Grinding Wheel Flanges
14/09/2019 15:17:20

To the best of my knowledge, the real 'Picador' is long-gone [although knock-offs of their products seem to be available on ebay]

Best bet is probably to grab these flanges as and when you see them at Car Boot Sales, etc.

MichaelG.

.

Edit: ... even Grace's Guide doesn't tell us much

https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Picador_Engineering_Co

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/09/2019 15:25:36

Thread: ACME thread identification question.
14/09/2019 13:19:12

Thanks again, Pete

So we now know [pretty much for sure] that the English version was made for plunge rolling a 10tpi LH ACME form thread ... 'though I can't quite decide whether, or not, the instruction effectively includes the rolling thereof.

[my thinking is that it probably does ... because the ACME form is sufficiently well-prescribed to need no further detailing]

Mystery stll surrounds the [Boxford special] Metric specification though

MichaelG.

.

https://www.amesweb.info/Screws/AcmeScrewNutThreadDimensions.aspx

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/09/2019 13:23:16

14/09/2019 10:09:13

Thanks, Pete yes

That would be really interesting to see.

MichaelG.

14/09/2019 09:50:06
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 14/09/2019 09:16:20:
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 13/09/2019 23:11:29:
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 13/09/2019 11:16:48:

The Boxford drawing specifies that the threads are plunge rolled - for the imperial leadscrews at least.

...

Did they do the thread rolling in-house, or sub-contract, I wonder. dont know

... either way [if I understand the process correctly] that would require a serious machine and long dies.

MichaelG.

...

Buying parts in has long been a common commercial arrangement. [ ... ]

.

Quite so, Dave ... and the Pope is usually a Catholic devil

I am interested in how and where the Boxford screws were made, because that knowledge might help us understand why they chose to use a 'bastard' thread.

MichaelG.

13/09/2019 23:11:29
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 13/09/2019 11:16:48:

The Boxford drawing specifies that the threads are plunge rolled - for the imperial leadscrews at least.

.

Thanks for that, Pete

Did they do the thread rolling in-house, or sub-contract, I wonder. dont know

... either way [if I understand the process correctly] that would require a serious machine and long dies.

MichaelG.

.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RPcy8-6Hfqg

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 13/09/2019 23:12:25

Thread: My new lathe a Warco 918
13/09/2019 08:43:07

That's very encouraging, Ron ... thanks for sharing your experience.

MichaelG.

Thread: ACME thread identification question.
13/09/2019 08:40:26

It would be interesting [albeit not particularly useful] to know how Boxford went about making these 'bastard' components.

Presumably; being tooled-up to make make male screws with an ACME thread-form [whether by screw-cutting or by grinding] the easy option would have been to make their own taps to finish the nuts.

If anyone knows how Boxford produced these items, do please tell us.

MichaelG.

Thread: Recommendation for Tool and Cutter Grinder
12/09/2019 20:45:34

Thanks for the clarification, David

... That explains the 'seemingly impossible'

MichaelG.

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