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Member postings for fishy-steve

Here is a list of all the postings fishy-steve has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Laser Tachometer
03/05/2019 10:29:15
Posted by Adam Harris on 02/05/2019 19:47:36:

I've just bought the DT-2234C but might also try one those permanent installations

Hi Adam,

Wish I had seen your post earlier. I purchased the same tacho that is in the picture of the first post.

It didn't work. It was a piece of junk. Hope you have more luck with yours.

Steve.

Thread: Telescopic bore gauges
17/04/2019 12:53:03

I've got a cheap set in a blue wallet.(not from ARC). For me they are only any use for picking your nose with.

I have now purchased a set of second hand Starrett 229s.(The same as the set I use at work.)

A point that is worth making is that the Starrett 229s have 1 fixed bar and one sliding. In my experience it is far easier to get the correct feel with this type of telescopic gauge. The cheap sets tend to have 2 sliding bars. Also, I believe Starrett make a set with 2 sliding bars. Maybe someone could confirm this?

Steve.

Thread: Simple WorkshopTips
07/04/2019 10:29:07
Posted by Hopper on 07/04/2019 02:10:46:

When screwcutting or even regular turning etc, use a whiteboard marker to mark the zero point on the dial and the desired full depth etc. Whiteboard marker wipes off with the rub of a finger so you don't end up with a cross slide dial full of multiple permanent marker lines.

I was shown a similar trick by an old turner many years ago. He always had a pencil tucked behind his right ear when screw cutting. He would advance the cross slide and mark the dial before every cut. This way he never lost track of his depth.

I've done the same thing when screw cutting ever since.

Thread: What new lathe?
25/03/2019 19:43:57
Posted by David Standing 1 on 25/03/2019 15:14:34:

Steve

It's a matter of logistics.

Three lathes, three milling machines, two large benches, a Clarkson grinder, pedestal grinder, floor standing drill, floor standing polisher and various storage cabinets have to all share the same space!

The Student is that way round so I can get the change wheel door open, and pass material through the spindle.

It sits back to back with my Myford 254S as that is the most economical use of space.

Ideally I would have it flat to the wall, but there is already a tall tool cabinet, Myford 254S, and a Warco WM18 along the same wall!

I should have clicked on your photo albums before commenting. That's a heck of a well equipped workshop you have there.

I had the use of Colchester students and Harrison M300s and 400s as an apprentice. Great machines.

Steve.

25/03/2019 12:55:42

Very nice!

Not sure if I would have it that close to the wall though. I've had to remove my tailstock a couple of times to face off extra long jobs that were sat in a steady. Looks like the wall will prevent you easily doing so? Completely unnecessary if you only machine short lengths of course or if the machine isn't sited yet.

Steve.

Thread: Chester 836 Milling Machine
21/03/2019 19:14:46

Hi Colin,

I use one in work. I'd say it's a bit light for Industrial use but a good machine for hobby use. It has had light use in the 5 years that we've had it from new. The one shot lube pump broke pretty early on.

If you need more info just shout.

Steve.

Thread: Boxford Screwcutting box / Leadscrew binding
16/03/2019 10:52:33
Posted by Hopper on 16/03/2019 09:19:31:

Treat the old girl to a new belt. They harden with age and glaze up, losing grip. Get a good brand name replacement so you know it won't slip from the get go. As per usual, some of the cheap imitations are not up to snuff.

Has luck would have it. I have some for sale on ebay! 😁

Thread: What is this grinder?
16/03/2019 09:58:19
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 16/03/2019 07:28:54:

Interesting that there is a reversing switch on it. Is that so that left handed workers can use the other side of the wheel ??

I found that side of the wheel very useful for doing the top rake of a right handed tool. That way you can easily keep an eye on the cutting edge and not catch the tool or your fingers on the other side of the wheel.

Using the reversing switch meant the grindng forces are down as are the sparks.

Steve.

Edited By fishy-steve on 16/03/2019 09:59:48

Thread: Mystery object
16/02/2019 13:24:12

Looking at this picture you can see the fiducial indicator in it's instrument.screw-thread-measurer.jpg

Thread: Digital speed display
02/02/2019 10:19:07

I hope you have more luck with it than I had with mine Bill.

I purchased one from an ebay seller in China and it was faulty from the get go.

It would have been more expensive to send it back than it was worth.

Lesson learnt though. I pay a bit more now and only buy from UK based resellers.

Steve.

Thread: Split die cutting undersize
09/01/2019 15:27:00

Probably a silly question but what diameter is the material your threading. You didn't say you have turned it. Is it possible you've picked up 12mm BDS instead of 1/2" by any chance?

Steve.

Thread: Homemade Grinder Advice
03/01/2019 22:34:11

If you go down the route of buying a Clarkson T+CG try and get one with lots of the accessories. They can be very expensive. If you buy just the bare machine your back to the "best use of your time" problem. You will have to make all sorts of additional tooling to make any use of the machine.

I still find that if I need to grind up a lathe tool I will do it free hand on the bench grinder.

Steve.

Thread: Restoration and modifications to a Tom Senior light vertical mill
31/12/2018 12:21:02

Very nice. I was following that very machine on ebay!

I've noticed a steady increase in value over the years. Yours is a particularly nice example.

Have fun.

Steve.

Thread: Vertex Rotary Table equal 13 sectors
23/12/2018 22:16:36

For a 90:1 rotary table.

90/13 = 6 12/13 = 6 turns and 36 holes in a 39 hole plate.

Steve.

Thread: Wall Storage Recommendation
23/12/2018 15:41:17
Posted by Vic on 23/12/2018 14:48:02:

Bisley shut their factory in Surrey about five or six years ago. I think they moved to wales?

Hi Vic,

Bisley are in Wales. Newport to be exact. I drive past their factory every day to work. They must be doing well as they have just extended the factory.

Steve.

Thread: Reverse thread cutting
22/12/2018 17:30:42
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 22/12/2018 16:51:48:

hi Steve, yes, but you are "lifting"the saddle off the bed. On the Boxford, there is a rear saddle clamp, and a front saddle/ bed lock, but its a fiddle trying to tighten the rear cap screws when they are inverted and out of sight.

Hi Bob,

I never have to tighten the rear saddle clap screws when parting off with HSS..

I purchased a parting tool from JB cutting tools at the midlands show this year. My Boxford can easily part off in the conventional manner when using it. I have yet to try it in the rear tool post. I think this would probably be the best set up though.

Steve.

Edited By fishy-steve on 22/12/2018 17:31:31

Edited By fishy-steve on 22/12/2018 17:31:48

22/12/2018 15:59:20
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 21/12/2018 14:52:25:

What ideas do the team have to lock the chuck onto the spindle nose when cutting in reverse or rear tool post parting off. Typically on a Boxford with screw on chuck.
BobH

Hi Bob,

As far as parting off with a rear mounted tool post, just invert the tool and run in the conventional manner.

I do it that way on my Boxford.

Steve.

Thread: Rotary table
25/11/2018 20:34:41

Hi Martin,

Criterion rotary tables had a removable centre that had a slot cut through the centre to make removal easier. They were screwed in. Unfortunately on removal there was no morse taper cut in the bore.

Steve.

Thread: An alternative to parting-off
08/11/2018 10:36:59
Posted by Bill Pudney on 08/11/2018 01:45:24:

Some time ago I got an optical centre finder, it was on sale at the time. It has many useful functions, two of which are centre finding (that's a surprise!) and tool height setting, simply stick it in the tailstock chuck, and you can see the tool in scary detail. To my mind better than all the gauges, tools etc.

cheers

Bill

Hi Bill,

What sort of accuracy can be achieved with the optical centre finder? I've never used one.

Thinking on it a bit your method would only work on my Boxford if I allowed for the fact that my tailstock is sitting a couple of thou low due to wear on the base. I must get around to shimming it up.

Steve.

07/11/2018 22:32:56
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 07/11/2018 21:34:47:
Posted by fishy-steve on 07/11/2018 21:23:10:

I'm probably missing something but please tell me how you set a parting tool height 0.001" high of center? I'm not interested in a theoretical way. I would like to know the actual method used to ensure that level of accuracy .

Steve.

laugh

Oh there are many, many people on this forum and out there who have various devices for getting their tools dead on centre height. Best I ever came across was a bar carefully machined and lapped to be cut across at exactly half its diameter - this was then to be held in a self-centring chuck...

But it is easy enough with an accurately set gauge, and that's what they will use in industry.

In practice I set my tools by eye against a centre pip, so I'm just making sure it's fractionally high rather than fractionally low.

Hi Neil.

I think that your right. There are probably lots of people on the forum who have made various tools to achieve centre. I have myself. But I wouldn't say, hand on heart, that I can achieve the level of accuracy people are talking about.

As for industry. I have personally never seen a turner set a tool to centre taking the level of care that would be needed to get these results. At work I tend to use a centre in the tailstock and my eye. Similar to your own method.

Steve.

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