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Member postings for Vic

Here is a list of all the postings Vic has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Centre punch
04/12/2014 11:51:48

Forgot to mention, there was an article in one of the magazines about accurately drilling holes. After punching each location the writer scribed boxes around each one and used these to check accurate progress of each hole as he went up through drill sizes. Each box was a fraction larger than the required finished diameter. The scribed boxes showed if any holes wandered so they could be "brought back" to centre. I believe the writer called it "boxing" or something similar. Those of us with mills take accurate hole drilling for granted I guess but it's all to easy to get it wrong even with a decent pillar drill. Just a thought.

04/12/2014 11:39:40

The standard price for the Eclipse E172 is indeed over £40. They paid £42 for one at work about 10-12 years ago.

I paid £8 for mine at one of the shows.

You can make your own points for them easily enough, I think the thread is around M4. I made around half a dozen different shaped ends for mine for punching wood for Ukibori. Don't ask, I haven't got round to trying it yet!

Thread: Re-tapping damaged thread
04/12/2014 10:32:28

In the first instance I would run a first taper tap down it and then inspect the threads and check it with a bolt. I don't much like helecoils but it is an option provided drilling the hole out larger to accommodate it doesn't weaken the part.

I went to a local engineering firm to pick up some steel this week and the guy happened to show me an alloy casting he repaired with weld and then taped again. Partially filling the hole with weld is another option then if you can get it done.

Thread: Linisher Belts
02/12/2014 19:16:08

It actually works out quite a bit cheaper for me to buy 150mm wide belts and split them into three. I have also bought quite fine belts on a paper backing but it was a PITA to split these as they need to be cut all the way round with scissors. They were quite economical though as they were around 12 - 16" wide if I remember correctly. No idea what machine they were for but Axminster supplied them.

I use 60 or 80 grit to start with then drop down to something like 120 or 150 if I need a finer edge. No reason why you shouldn't finish off with 250 or higher if you want to though.

Thread: Collets
02/12/2014 09:13:02

It's only a tiddler Clive but this one has an ER spindle.

http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=4660&category=

Thread: Diamond tool holder.??
01/12/2014 21:17:22

Yes quite right, once set up you're only limited by the number of Toolholders you have. Nice selection Norman!

I couldn't justify the cost for what I do so I've stuck with the four way though. I've got round the quick change part by bonding shims of the right thickness to the bottom of my insert holders so the're permanently on centre. Good plan except I noticed one of the shims had dropped off of one during last years house move! I think perhaps I didn't degrease it properly when I epoxied it. Oh well, another little job to add to the list!

Thread: Collets
01/12/2014 16:45:31

I second the use of the ball bearing ER32 nut, they make life so much easier. For some jobs I've even closed it by hand when making light cuts on small stuff!

Thread: Linisher Belts
01/12/2014 16:21:21

Someone used to give me hardly used belts 150 x 1220 which I regularly used to split into three. You don't need to cut all the way round with scissors, just make an accurate cut with a stanley blade and then just tear it the rest of the way. The only part that needs cutting is the taped joint.

Thread: Diamond tool holder.??
01/12/2014 16:14:50

Posted by Barry Chamberlain 1 on 01/12/2014 09:34:55:

Having just looked at the Wimberley holder manual the tool grinding procedure seems to be as intricate as for a regular cutting tool whereas the Diamond Tangential tool grinding procedure (AND alignment in the tool holder) is just so straightforward, achievable by anyone of any level of expertise, and more importantly - consistent.

Why not try both tools Neil and do a comparison in MEW? Think I know which tool will come out tops!!

Barry

I think you're right Barry. The Tangential tool is quick and foolproof when it comes to sharpening.

I've also made a height gauge specific for my Lathe as well so set up is very quick. Probably quicker than using a QCTP.

30/11/2014 18:59:32

Hi Chris, 30° from the horizontal. Even for folks that have bought their toolholders I'd reccomend making the grinding jig. It's much nicer to use than the supplied one.

Thread: Dore Westbury Collets
25/11/2014 20:39:05

MT2 Collets here if it's of use.

http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue/Collets/Morse-Taper-Collets/Morse-Taper-Collets---METRIC

Thread: Todays update from Bodgers Lodge
22/11/2014 10:40:55

Has to be said, you're a clever bloke John. yes

Thread: Restoring an Elliot Progress Drill
18/11/2014 12:06:30

All sorted, spindles out and bearings off. Just need to decide what grease to use on the new bearings. The old stuff was some kind of white grease.

18/11/2014 09:17:00

Anyone?

16/11/2014 17:21:11

Help! I've got a progress No 1 in bits at the moment but I can't get the spindle out of the quill. I've tried holding the assembly and hitting the top of the spindle with a copper and hide and it does move down about half an inch loosening the lower bearing from the housing (but still tight on the shaft) but that's as far as it goes. Have I missed something or do I need a bigger hammer?

Thread: Setting up the lathe accurately
16/11/2014 11:15:19

Does this help?

http://youtu.be/ZaIuHNFIFNw

http://igor.chudov.com/manuals/Rollies-Dads-Method-of-Lathe-Alignment.pdf

16/11/2014 10:56:30

As a point of interest, we had 4 or 5 M300's where I used to work. They ordered a brand new one which I'm told are now manufactured in Poland. The new machine looked identical to the old ones except it was white instead of grey and I was quite noisy compared to the old ones as well.

Thread: Milling Machine Trammel
15/11/2014 12:18:12

If I had access to a large lathe I'd get and old disc brake rotor (or something similar) and turn a nice smooth face on it and sized to my mill, firmly weld a nice chunky spigot on it and then return it to the lathe to turn the spigot true as in Johns post earlier. Once made it's mounted in the biggest collet you have and the Mill head is loosened. The knee is then raised until the "tool" is flat on the table without any movement. Head secured, job done.

Another option is part of a nice large universal joint from something like a van. It should be quite accurate to start with but you'll need to turn a nice stub on it anyway to fit your collet. I gave up looking for one but I think VW vans might have something suitable. Guess it might need softening before it can be turned?

I should add that after I thought of this some years ago a search on google provided a link to a company that actually makes small versions of this for modest mills like the X2. Do a google, I didn't bookmark the link. Let's call this "tool" a "Bell Trammel" for want of another name! Only a thought...

14/11/2014 18:48:14

You don't even need a DTI. I was taught to use a "z" bar and two fag papers to check the mill head for vertical, but that's another story.

14/11/2014 10:19:10

Thanks John, I've got a Mitutoyo indicator somewhere that I never use so perhaps I'll see if I can get a twin for it and make a rig.

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