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Member postings for Nigel McBurney 1

Here is a list of all the postings Nigel McBurney 1 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Why mostly manual cars in UK
05/12/2019 22:03:21

I need a 4wd vehicle,high low transfer box, high towing capacity,for my hobby --stationary engines, in recent years a manual Discovery 3 was a disaster,unreliable ,manual g/box which I prefer was a nightmare in conjunction with an electric hanbrake which is either on,and I mean full on or off,a nightmare with a heavy trailer going up hill in stop start traffic,a manual handbrake can be held just on to prevent rolling back,let the cluch in and it takes off,with just a little bit of handbrake held on until the drive takefully up, the electric brake takes too long to release and and makes drivind smoothly difficult. Next a Nissan ,a manual good motor until yiu tow a trailer worst trailer tower I have owned in over 50 years,ultimatum from the other half,get a new Discovery 4,I was a bit reluctant as it was only available with auto g/box,never owned an auto before,and had only driven my mother aut austin 1100 many years ago MOT and back,awful car. I got used to the Discovery auto surprisingly quickly,it is superb with a trailer no risk of running back going uphill and do not use the hand brake in normal driving.But and a big but despite it being made by land rover it is b---y awful off road ,it would be a lot better with manual box ,with a manual you can pick the right gear for the conditions and hold that gear for the best wheelgrip ,my old manual v8 mk1 range rover was far far better off rd I can understand why a lot of drivers still prefer manual,lot better in tricky conditions,more likely to go expensivly go wrong, though I can see after 10 years of a multi gear auto why they are like by far more drivers particularly in dense traffic. years ago autos were usually 3 speed,a bit clunky ,cost more and used a lot more petrol,plus did noget good prices when trading in. One annoyance with my discovery auto is the hassle involved to get the g/box oil changed,or I should say partially changed as unless the box is completely dismantled it is impossible to completely change the oil,all that can be done is drain the oil ,then refill ,run so that the new oil mixes with some of the oil thats left in the box,then drain again and refill,plus draining on the discovery involves removing a chassis crossmember to drop the bottom pan to get at the oil filter,or buy an after market pan which saves disturbing the cross member,plus its best to go to a specialist,as getting the fill wrong would be vey expensive,

Thread: How should I check a milling machine?
03/12/2019 22:14:09

Aciera apart from wear issues which would be hard to correct, anything to do with this machine and other continental mills of this type is just expensive. the spindle size is a bit limited ok for making small very precise items Make sure that the machine has all the equipment and accessories,as you will not find anything on the used market,apart from the odd collet. I bid a couple of years ago for an f3 ,immaculate with ALL the equipment,it went for over £6k ,A bridgeport is a better bet for the model engineer,you should not run out of capacity,whereas capacity is limited on these small continental mills, I worked on a Deckel 50 years ago ,just superb at a price,

Thread: Breaking bandsaw blades
02/12/2019 18:46:26

I have "Do All " type bandsaw made in uk under licence by Alexanders, it has a built in butt welder,with a follow up anneal. I have found that if i am a bit too quick with the annealing the weld will break,changing supplier may be the answer.

Thread: Long bed lathes affected by the tide
29/11/2019 22:25:06

Believe Vospers were located in Gosport,west side of Portsmouth harbour, On the north eastern side of Portsmouth,around the old airfield area, close to Farlington marshes the tide was also known to affect the stability of machine tools,I believe it was Marconis & De Havilands factories. I dont remember which type of machines were affected,as most high precision machines are built with only three mounting points ie grinders,jig borers etc so they should not been affected ,where I worked a few miles along the coast the large Cincinatti cnc mill sat on a 4 ft deep block of concrete, Searching the net a while ago in Vickers archives,there were photos of the foundation of a very large long bed lathe ,probably for prop shafts, the excavation was 20 ft deep and around 100 ft long and then filled with concrete.Its well known that heavy presses and other tools eg drop forging stamps were know to upset other machine tools,and in more recent times electrical supplies to cnc sheet metal punches have been affected when spot and arc welders were in use.

Thread: Precision Tool Vice Type 2
25/11/2019 09:48:53

In My view one shoud be able to use a machine vice to its capacity without marking the mill table, One solution could be to cut a piece of gauge plate to the size of the vice base and place the plate between the vice base and the table,then it does not matter if the gauge plate is damaged,it should not affect the accuracy of the vice as gauge plate is ground parallel. I was apprenticed to a company that made scientific instruments,a lot went to education establishments,our boss had a saying ,when designing instruments they should be foolproof,idiot proof and then most important student proof. A toolmaker friend always preferred to use aluminium parallels when milling in the vice,his reason was that if he accidentally hit the parallel it did not wreck the cutter and if one is self employed you have to pay for a new cutter out of your pocket.

Thread: 1.1kw motor iffy
24/11/2019 11:11:07

I had an oil fired central heating boiler ,the fuel pump was driven by a single phase motor, the start capacitor was clamped to the motor within the dust cover and close to the burner housing. Occasionally the boiler failed to fire,internet boiler problem searches suggested capacitor failure,a new capacitor cured the problem,a friend with the right test meter confirmed the capicitance was just less than half the rating, some time later the capacitor failed again ,so I put the problem to the the capacitor was working in a confined hot location so I added longer wires and secured the capacitor in a remote cooler location within the boiler casing ,problem solved. I have single phase cap start motors on my myford and Fobco drill both over 40 years old ,good English built motors ,are modern motors being built with capacitors which are only just up to the job and fail when overloaded by multiple starts per hour.?

Thread: Oilers
20/11/2019 12:48:33

I have restored a lot of stationary engine oilers,Usual problem is that the needle is worn or the needle seat is damaged, the glass in the oiler also needs sealing. some modern oilers are rubbish,made from steel and brass plated. First of all test the oiler on the bench, lightly nip it by the hexagon in a bench vice,pour some oil in the oiler and seep if it drips when the needle is dropped in the closed position by the lever,then raise the lever and watch the drips they should drop repeatedly. If the needle leaks in the off position then remove the needle set up in the lathe ans turn a new taper just take off a few thou.Then tackle the seating in the brass body,the should not be tapered ie made with a dill ,a taper seating in a taper will leak,the seating should be flat ie made with a slot drill so that the needle seats on a sharp edge, very similar to ball seatings in steam fittings. Do not machine too much off as thes can prevent the needle from seating it will just be suspended above the seat. Now when testing the oiler for leaks,if the drips can be controlled and the oil is spreading over the vice ,the cause is the joint between the glass and brass flange, some oilers are fitted with plastic/fibre sealing washers which fail to seal, as they can be too hard,washers cut from 1.5 mm cork sheet work much better sometimes they need a small amount of sealant,a good oiler should maintain its oil for a long time.

20/11/2019 12:48:28

I have restored a lot of stationary engine oilers,Usual problem is that the needle is worn or the needle seat is damaged, the glass in the oiler also needs sealing. some modern oilers are rubbish,made from steel and brass plated. First of all test the oiler on the bench, lightly nip it by the hexagon in a bench vice,pour some oil in the oiler and seep if it drips when the needle is dropped in the closed position by the lever,then raise the lever and watch the drips they should drop repeatedly. If the needle leaks in the off position then remove the needle set up in the lathe ans turn a new taper just take off a few thou.Then tackle the seating in the brass body,the should not be tapered ie made with a dill ,a taper seating in a taper will leak,the seating should be flat ie made with a slot drill so that the needle seats on a sharp edge, very similar to ball seatings in steam fittings. Do not machine too much off as thes can prevent the needle from seating it will just be suspended above the seat. Now when testing the oiler for leaks,if the drips can be controlled and the oil is spreading over the vice ,the cause is the joint between the glass and brass flange, some oilers are fitted with plastic/fibre sealing washers which fail to seal, as they can be too hard,washers cut from 1.5 mm cork sheet work much better sometimes they need a small amount of sealant,a good oiler should maintain its oil for a long time.

Thread: Lathe chuck guards - how many folk use them?
13/11/2019 10:08:34

When I was a lad, in rural Sussex the factory inspector was a lady and the staff always seemed to know when a visit was due ,so there was a warning find the drilling machine guard and fit it ,none of the lathes had chuckguards,they were probably unheard of in those days, the horizontal mill always had it guards fitted,when the inspector left the drill guards went back on the shelf.

Thread: New three jaw chuck suggestions
13/11/2019 09:53:33

I have bought 8 inch Bison chucks in the past from Rotagrip ,and they have proved very good ,one is 30 years old and had a lot of commercial use, so I bought another for regular precise jobs and kept the old one for rough jobs,plus i have a 6 inch TOS from another source and that has proved ok, I buy my back plates and soft jaws from Rotagrip,though looking at current new prices,the eastern european chucks are a lot more expensive than they were,though I have found Rotagrip to be a good supplier, I have been told that Pratt Burnerd chucks also come from eastern europe though they still use their own dimensions for the jaw sizes etc. Never did see the point of the expensive grip true chuck, the ordinary Burnerd chuck was very good if looked after ,its overtightening and straining that ruins a 3 jaw chuck, I also have a 5 inch Burnerd chuck for my Myford ,i aquired it second hand,it required a backplate,so I machined the register with a couple of thou slop, put an inch dia precision roller in the chuck and trued it up on the back plate with bolts a little more than finger tight then really tightened it when was running true, you might ask why have a 5 inch chuck on a Myford when you also have a Colchester,well some times with tricky jobs which easily fit in the jaws of a 5 inch chuck do not fit so conveniently in 4 or 6 inch chuck jaws,and the 5 inch is for only occasional use,I dont go silly and spin it up to top speed.

Thread: Raw angle plate
13/11/2019 09:25:46

A long defunct local steel fabricating company ,at one time were a bit short of work so they made some heavy angle plates,about 10 inches long with sides of 8 inches,no webs,they used flat steel plate possibly one inch thick,for their own use. the plates were welded together ,i was told that they were annealed after welding,and prior to machining. My friend who worked there aquired some of the plates when the factory closed, some years later he gave me two of these plates, they were a bit rusty so I cleaned them up and found they were out of square by about two thou over 8 ins, so I set them up on my col triumph face plate using a good cast iron angle plat eand machined them square,after ten tears they are still square.so it can be done but the welding must be first class , I have some WDS cast iron angles,and a U section which is very useful, most I picked up at s/h dealers,auto jumbles or gifts from friends,they are very accurate ,new sections from WDS are horendously expensive ,if you buy a foreign angle plate or a used one take a good sqare with you and check the angle plate for squareness ,some can be out of square.

Thread: EN3 bowing after machining
13/11/2019 09:02:31

I have a long length of key steel (en 9) 1/2 by 3/4 which I use for stationary engine gib head keys,if I take a short length say 4 inches and machine down one side it will curl up by an 1/16 or more, so I usually get it red hot with the propane torch,for a few minutes and let it cool slowly on the fire brick hearth,this relieves the stress and machines ok in a straight line. To get over the T nut with a slight curve,i would cut the nuts to length, then set one at a time in the machine vice,with narrow bit of the t upwards just as they sit in the t slot in the machine,then take a light cut either side so that the part of the nut which comes in contact with the underside of the tee slot is truly flat. It should be flat so that it will spread the load on the underside of the t slot,it does not matter if the other surfaces of the t nut are not true.

Thread: machine dovetails.
10/11/2019 17:18:18

If you look at the larger top surface in the photo , the frosting from the scraper is only visible on the centre section,so there is also wear on the flat top part so idealy both the dovetail and the flat both need attention,I visited Tom Seniors many years ago,at the time there was a mill table set up for machining on a vertical mill, they followed machine tool manufacturers usual practice of having a deep cast iron "box" on the mills table,the top of the box was machined flat and the box stayed in place ,and possibly never removed.so the mill table plus the fixture was solid and remained dead flat and could not be easily distorted when clamping the work the be machined,I do not remember seeing a large shaper in the works. so I should imagine they had special size dovetail cutters made to suit the job,there were lots of specialists making cutters in those days. A big vertical mill in good condition is required to machine this job as it is so easy to get the xy axis out of square, and keep the top of the table to the z axis square.

Thread: Yet another 'which mill shall I buy'
10/11/2019 11:22:09

If you can afford one,go for a Bridgeport A really good toolmaking friend (Vickers Trained) swears by them ,his comment was you can earn a living with one ,they are so easy to use and all the controlls come to hand so easily. A bridgeport is easy to sell ,larger turret mills ie Gate or Elliot are good but are difficult to sell due to the height making drawbar removal difficult, In fact I had an Elliot and then was given a Gate I had the idea of tidying it up and selling it to make a bob or two,just could not sell it due to the height ,so it was scrapped. Due to downsizing I sold the Elliot and was given an Elliot omnimill ,had it now for 3 years, and find that it works well has plenty of xyz axis travel ,

Thread: Tools for Super 7
06/11/2019 09:50:18

The S7 was designed in the early 1950s when the world used Hss tools and learned to grind them correctly,their performance was more than satisfactory ,never saw carbide tools on small lathes,when machining fine work Hss tools cut accurately with fine finish,and are a lot cheaper than carbide tips and HSS can be ground easily into any shape or form. Using high speeds with carbide will cause higher wear on a small lathe,remember you are not earning a living so why thrash the lathe to death. On my Colchester I use carbide tips on stainless steel,long roughing runs on steel and finish off with HSS tips also have efficient chip breakers which reduces the large amounts of curly swarf.most of my turning is with HSS.I do have a set of Myford brazed on carbide tools ,purchased in good condition cheaply,I use these when roughing out ,iron sand castings and non ferrous sand castings,as these can ruin the cutting edge of HSS tools.and I also keep the lathe bed clean as the swarf from castings can abrade the bed. I feel that there is a tendency to use carbide tip tooling as a lot of lathe users do not know how to grind and sharpen HS,just take a look at some of the second hand hss bits on auto jumble stalls,the previous owners must have clueless when grinding these tools..

Thread: Installation of a Myford (or any machine tool)
06/11/2019 09:22:50

Use flooring grade chip board,my S7 has stood on it for 25 years,and is freestanding ie not bolted to the floor,no need for a small lathe, my clochester sits on the same floor,again not bolted down.from my experience in the 1950s/60s was that most machines were free standing,machines that were bolted down were those that were top heavy ie drilling machines,particularly radial drills,

Thread: What Did You Do Today 2019
02/11/2019 22:59:19

Andrew those 2 Es are nice machines,watch out when you go to get one of your files from the wall clips,dont come up quick and bang your head under the mill overarm sticking out the back,I found that the vertical head gets heavier as you get older,I used to get my mate to help me lift it,they can be lifted with an engine crane,Adcocks should have built in a lifting arm and a parking place for the head on the mill column like some manufacturers did. At least with a head like that and a 40 int spindle ,some really decent cuts can be taken with end mills ,and facing cutters,we were going to downsize so I passed on the mill to a friend,then the house sale fell through ,I will never get rid of anything in future unless the sale documentation is completed.

Thread: Colchester Master Mk1 lifting + moving advice
02/11/2019 09:44:41

Looking at yuor photos,and with two helpers,a pallet truck would work,plus two or three sheets of 19 mm shuttering ply,I have a pallet truck at home it will move heavy loads,can be easily manouverd but it will not go up over steps ,the small rollers under the pallet forks are only about 3 inches in diameter so will no up and over the edge of 19 mm ply small wedge type ramps are required, cut some 4 x 2 timber about 2 ft long into a pair of long wedges to form a gentle ramp. the wheels near the handle are larger diameter a similar ramp but shorter would help, do not attempt to run a pallet truck over your paving stones, the small rollers will not roll over them ,just use plywood all the way,when the shed is reached a pallet truck should be able to lift the pallet level with the shed step,pack the pallet with timber to ensure the pallet is stable then using crow bars slip some 1.5 mm steel sheet under the lathe,ie between lathe and pallet for at least 18 inches then pull the lathe into the shed, ratchet straps with long handles make a good "winch' a rawl bolt in the concrete floor and the strap between the bolt and the lathe .a strap will pull for about 15 inches,unwind the strap and have another short pull, Now when securing top heavy loads with ratchet straps,never loop a strap right over the lathe and secure each end to the pallet, or the rings on the side or floor of a trailer,if the load tilts it will roll over within the loop of the strap, best way is a strap between the top of the lathe and the pallet,and then another strap from pallet to lathe on the other side the two separate strops will stop the load rolling.when using the pallet truck I have in the past secured the load to the pallet forks rather than the pallet, because pallets can slip on the steel forks. Go slowly and carefully,it will take a lot longer to lift a lathe upright if it falls off the pallet, anothe point always avoid wrapping a strop around the lathe bed and putting a load on the leadscrew and feed shaft,bent lead screws dont work!!! I have retrieved and awful lot of stationary engines,restored them,mounted them on trolleys ,and exhibited them plus the machines in my workshop,

Thread: V-belt vibration in Ajax AJ8 horizontal milling machine
01/11/2019 19:27:26

Now there is a picture,the mill small and not up to 5 by 1/2 cutters, where the arbour enters the arbour the diameter appears reduced so to myr eckoning ,the taper is probably 2 MT,too small for a large cutter ,now when milling the golden rule is support the arbour, unless the work or the vice gets fouls the arbour or the column , get the cutter as close to the column is possible and then amount arbour support as close to the cutter as possible. on big mills and heavy work,more than one arbour support is used either side of the cutter, and then there is usually a tie bar from the top arbour support down to the knee,.Just think,that mill is about eqvivalent to a 5 inch lathe say a Boxford, would any one try using a parting tool a half inch wide !! because that is what is being tried on this small mill.with the wide cutter. This is not a belt problem ,apart from requiring a means of tensioning, its just hammering a small machine to death,plus the speed range is far too high,4 inch dia cutters about 3/16 or a 1/4 wide should be its maximum, capacity,in ally or non ferrous and a bit less in steel.

Thread: Tapping drill size
31/10/2019 21:15:42

30 years ago I was involved on a large hard drive LM25 cast aluminium base,round the clock 7 days a week and tapped thousands of M8 holes using 6.8 mm drills,with no problems.If I was tapping stainless steel I would probably use 6.9 or 7 mm,

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