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Member postings for Chris Banninger

Here is a list of all the postings Chris Banninger has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Bronze wire, where to find
24/11/2011 01:26:48


Posted by Robert Dodds on 23/11/2011 10:41:28:
Goran,
Beryllium Copper is the ideal spring material. It has both anti corrosion and good electrical conductivity as well as a relatively high modulus for elasticity.
Do you know what dia wire you want?
I've got some 0.028" dia if of any use
Bob

Thread: Chinese lathes
17/01/2011 12:43:43
Even the Japanese couldn't make a hobby lathe at a profit which was worth spit.
 
 
I owned a Toyo ML210 lathe in the 80's. Made by Toyo Special Camera. Sold in some countries as Sakai or Toyo/Sakai. Was very well made. About the size of an Emco Unimat but a grass-green color. About the same price too. Toyo also made a larger hobbylathe, the Toyo 360. That one was about the size on an Emco Compact 5. Both models were available with an optional milling column. I think they made some profits in the 80's. The machines looked very similar if not identical to today's Proxxon lathes and mills, maybe they bought the rights from Toyo? Chris
Thread: ER Collets
11/01/2011 02:22:03
Posted by KWIL on 10/01/2011 13:46:07:
Chris Banniger, may I suggest you read Rego-Fix's own data sheets as they quite clearly state that you can use the full clamping range, eg put a 12.2 in a 12-13 collet and still maintain concentricity. So there is no need to worry about putting 1/4" in a 6-7mm ER
 
Kwil, of course you can use the full clamping range. You will just notice some inconveniences, like needing several turns of the closer nut to clamp or release. Like loosing some clamping force. Like loosing some of the good runout specs.
 
Why do you think is it, that ER collets are very popular in metric countries and not so in America? In Europe, ER is almost the defacto indutry standard for toolholding.
 
Regarding the clamping force, no matter what collet you look at, they always clamp strongest at the designed diameter. Take a 10 mm collet: it has a bore that is precisely round at 10mm diameter. Only at 10 mm diameter. If you clamp into this collet a tool with a shaft of 9mm (which is within its clamping range) you will not fail to notice by naked eye, that the collapsed bore of the collet only grips the toolshaft at 6 narrow lines. The gap between collet and workpiece looks like a vawy washer. It is easy to see how this greatly reduced contact surface must result in a loss of clamping force.
It also affects runout, runout is specified only at the collets nominal diameter, not at collapsed diameters. Yes double taper collets are better in this regard than single taper collets. In the home shop it may not matter much, but in industry it does. They regard ER collets as consumables, on a machining centre an ER collet may have a life of two weeks before it is tossed. But life is of course greatly reduced if using up the collets clamping range. At home it all does not matter. I am using ER's in my lathe and in the mill since almost 30 years and like ER and still have my first set made by Schaublin and recently bought a second set from HongKong. Both work well for me. It is just good to know the whole story so one can understand the limitations. Chris
 
10/01/2011 11:51:00
The today most common "double taper double slit" ER25 collets with 12 slits, 6 from the front and 6 from the rear, have a COLLAPSING range of 1mm for all sizen down to 2mm. Sizes below 2mm nominal diameter have a collapsing range of 0.5mm. Early style ER collets of some 30+ years ago had less slits and only 0.5mm range. You can instantly ruin an ER collet by forcing it to clamp oversize: for example, a 10mm collet can clamp anything between 10 and 9mm, but is damaged if made to clamp 10.1mm.

ERcollets were invented by the Swiss Rego-Fix. Originally for toolholding, but they are also suitable for workholding, albeit not for uses that require "dead length" repetability. Meaning that the lathe workpiece moves axially during clamping.

As a Swiss invention, ER collets are metric. And most ER collets available today are metric, even the popular cheap Chinese made ones with engraved imperial dimensions. Since you ask about in "Inches", I thought you should be aware of the disadvantages of using metric ER collets to clamp imperial tools or workpieces. For example: a 6mm shaft will fit perfectly into a 6mm ER collet, less than half a revolution of the closer nut will clamp or release the shaft, and contact area will be maximal (=maximal torque transmission and minimal runout). But clamping a 1/4" shaft (=6.4mm) into a metric series collet of 7mm diameter will require about 1.5 turns of the closer nut to clamp or release, and contact area will be much reduced.
If most you do want to clamp is imperial stuff, you really should get yourself some true imperial colletsts, not metric ER collets. There are true imperial ER collets made in the US, but these are rare and expensive and you need a larger number of them to cover gaplessly the whole claming range, because the most used fractional Inch diameters do not fit exactly the designed 1mm collapsing clamping range (there is some overlap). What I mean to say, if most you do is imperial, better choose an imperial design collet like c5 or the like. Yust a point to be aware of....
Chris  
 
Thread: Band saw conversion
02/12/2010 04:37:30
> There is (was?) a DeWalt739 which is a variable speed version, but I don't know
> what motor/mechanism was used. Anyone know ?
 
I have a DeWalt 3501 which is the same as the DW 739 but for another market. It has a 0.55kW induction motor of 2850rpm. Variable speed is by an adjustable cone V-belt pulley on the motor shaft. By changing the motor tensioning via a handle, the cones of the pulley open or close (just like the Dutch DAF cars did it 40 years ago). Speed range is 330 to 800 m/min.
 
I tried  to cut non ferrous metal with this bandsaw. The only serious problem is that the metal chips get embedded in the rubber tyres and are very difficult to remove from there and damage the tyre, eg cut into the tire. If used for metal, this bandsaw will in my opinion only have a very small fraction of the lifespan when used for wood and plastics.
 
This machine is made for DW in Italy. I live in Australia and it would be very difficult for me to obtain any spare parts for it. So I rather use it for wood and plastic only.   
 
Chris
Thread: Change gears for my lathe
12/10/2010 05:42:02
There are two gear combinations used to convert between the imperial and metric world.
 
125T / 127T
and
63T / 64T
 
The two gears are always used together and are coupled on the same shaft.
 
It the lathe has a metric leadsrew and one wishes to cut an imperial thread, the 63T wheel or the 125T wheel is the driver. And vise versa if the lathe has an imperial leadscrew and a metric thread is to be cut.
 
I like to look at it this way:
 
What above gear pairs do, is simply transform the conversion factor of 25.4 into the closest number that is easy to use to set up gear ratios, the number 25. 
 
125 divided by 127 multiplied by 25.4 = 25.0000000000 (exactly 25)
 
63 divided by 64 multiplied by 25.4 = 25.003125 (indeed a very close approximation)
 
 In practice, a 63/64 setup is as accurate as you will ever need it for any fastener application. The error only becomes a problem if you want to cut say an accurate imperial leadscrew on a lathe with metric leadscrew, because the error is recursive.
A 125/127 setup on the other hand is perfectly accurate (127 is the lowest interger. 25.4 X 5 = 127) and suitable to make precision leadscrews.
 
Chris
 
Thread: MEW Digital Archives
28/05/2010 10:55:17
 

With previous version of MEW digital archive I could easily print pages, to keep a paper copy of my favourite articles to read even without having to be connected to Internet, nor having to carry back my laptop. With the new magazine player now I couldn''t, is there any fixes? I''ll be glad if digital issues will came in *.pdf format, it will be fantastic to keep a copy on hard disk of entire collection!

Many thanks

 

Luca

Posted By Luca Rossi on 28/05/2010 09:18:29.
 
 
Hi Luca,
 

- download the free open source software "PDFcreator" and install on your computer
- open it's PDF Print Monitor window
- go to the ME digital archive and open any magazine
- print the cover page. A window PDFFCreator 0.9.9 will pop up.DO NOT hit the "Save" button, hit the "Wait-Collect" button instead. The printed page will appear as a line entry in the PDF Print Monitor window
- skip uninteresting advertisement pages, print all pages with real content, each printed page will show as an added line in the PDF Print Monitor Window. I found I have to wait until a page is loaded, before printing it, otherwise the eMAGcreator software will hang up.
- when finished, press the menu icon "Combine All" on top of the "PDF Print Monitor" window. The program now takes some time to compile all pages that you printed into one single document.
- when finished, press the menu icon for "Print".
 
You now have created a .pdf file that contains the WHOLE MAGAZINE (less the advertiser pages if you choose to skip them. It does not take much longer than it did with the old reader. But you cannot let it print in the background and do something else, you have to be there and press "print" for every page you wanted. On the plus side, the .pdf files created are smaller and the resolution just as good as before, and you can skip the useless advertiser pages. Moral of the story for the magazine management: where there is a will, there is always a workaround. Especially when they try to change rules less than halfway into a subscription, which was not a fair thing to do. They should be happy that they can sell us the old magazines for a second time as a digital edition. Expecting us to pay once more for every year we enjoy to look at the digital edition is just pushing it a little too far for me. I honestly think it will not work, because it makes us all feel ripped off.
Chris
Thread: New MEW Digital archive - access?
28/05/2010 10:49:20

With previous version of MEW digital archive I could easily print pages, to keep a paper copy of my favourite articles to read even without having to be connected to Internet, nor having to carry back my laptop. With the new magazine player now I couldn''t, is there any fixes? I''ll be glad if digital issues will came in *.pdf format, it will be fantastic to keep a copy on hard disk of entire collection!

Many thanks

 

Luca

Posted By Luca Rossi on 28/05/2010 09:18:29.
 
 
Hi Luca,
 

- download the free open source software "PDFcreator" and install on your computer
- open it's PDF Print Monitor window
- go to the ME digital archive and open any magazine
- print the cover page. A window PDFFCreator 0.9.9 will pop up.DO NOT hit the "Save" button, hit the "Wait-Collect" button instead. The printed page will appear as a line entry in the PDF Print Monitor window
- skip uninteresting advertisement pages, print all pages with real content, each printed page will show as an added line in the PDF Print Monitor Window. I found I have to wait until a page is loaded, before printing it, otherwise the eMAGcreator software will hang up.
- when finished, press the menu icon "Combine All" on top of the "PDF Print Monitor" window. The program now takes some time to compile all pages that you printed into one single document.
- when finished, press the menu icon for "Print".
 
You now have created a .pdf file that contains the WHOLE MAGAZINE (less the advertiser pages if you choose to skip them. It does not take much longer than it did with the old reader. But you cannot let it print in the background and do something else, you have to be there and press "print" for every page you wanted. On the plus side, the .pdf files created are smaller and the resolution just as good as before, and you can skip the useless advertiser pages. Moral of the story for the magazine management: where there is a will, there is always a workaround. Especially when they try to change rules less than halfway into a subscription, which was not a fair thing to do. They should be happy that they can sell us the old magazines for a second time as a digital edition. Expecting us to pay once more for every year we enjoy to look at the digital edition is just pushing it a little too far for me. I honestly think it will not work, because it makes us all feel ripped off.
Chris
Thread: Digital editions of Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop.
21/05/2010 11:42:06
However, my thoughts rightly or wrongly are that you are paying for 12 months access to a digital subscription.
Digital is just that, digital. It was never intended that subscribers download the entire collection of magazines as PDFs. That gives you access for more than the 12 months you have legally paid for.
 
David, we actually subscribed to one year  "unlimited access" to the online archive,  as per the "Sample Model Engineers' Workshop Archive Subscription".
 
This trial sample issue that was put up, did indeed let us print the magazine as a .pdf file. Nowhere did it say that this was not intended. Nor did it say anywhere in fine print that we would legally only pay for less than what was offered by the sample trial issue.
 
I feel that it is not fair, to change the rules just a few months into the subscription. If you like, change rules for new subscriptions. But honor your existing commitments.  
 
Chris
 
 
20/05/2010 13:15:23
Not all of us have fast internet at home, let alone in the workshop. That is why the ability of printing a range of pages is a crucial feature. But this feature is not enabled in the new reader, it lets me only print one page at a time at a snail pace. That is not what I subscribed for. I vote for the old reader being put back. Either that, or the full printing feature being enabled on the new reader. Chris 
Thread: New MEW Digital archive - access?
04/02/2010 05:03:32
David, it all worked well for me since you acted on my post 18.January.
 
But now, since yesterday, I get this message when I try to open any of the archived issues:
 
A licensing error does not
permit you to View this Document
Contact your supplier for more information
 
What has happened? Looks like the problem is caused by the reader that you use?
 
Chris
18/01/2010 02:35:33
I subscribed to the digital archive. Got an email back "subscription confirmation" like below. If I click on the link, I get this reply from your webpage: 
 
Signup Complete
Sorry, there was a problem with your Referrer. Please contact
Customer Services.
I cannot access the digital archive except for the two pages I did see befor as a normal MEW subscriber only.
 
No reply from my enquiry to customer services either. Do I now really have to wait for a subscription number by mail from GB to Australia? And will it then work?
 
 
Subject: MODEL ENGINEERS WORKSHOP DIGITAL ARCHIVE Subscription Confirmation
 
Thank you for your subscription to the Model Engineers' Workshop Digital Archive.

In order to access your subscription, you need to register for a free member account
here or login to your existing account. You will then need to enter your subscription number in the appropriate box in the 'My Details' section of your profile and save this before clicking on the 'Back Issues' link in the left hand menu. Here you will find issues of Model Engineers' Workshop between 1990 and 2007!

We hope you enjoy your subscription.



YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NUMBER: To be advised by post.

Service:MODEL ENGINEERS WORKSHOP DIGITAL ARCHIVE

YOUR NAME & ADDRESS:
xxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxx
AUSTRALIA
xxxxx

Payment: Visa £29.00

Customer Services: modelengworkshop@subscription.co.uk
 

Edited By David Clark 1 on 23/01/2010 12:41:38

Edited By David Clark 1 on 23/01/2010 12:46:01

Edited By David Clark 1 on 23/01/2010 14:18:38

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