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Member postings for Versaboss

Here is a list of all the postings Versaboss has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: program for simple drawing
18/05/2016 23:40:04

May I (once again I think) recommend SolveSpace

**LINK**

Not a 'real' CAD program with all bells and whistles, but very suitable for such small drawings.

Yes, it is necessary to read a bit in the manual and doing the examples, but it is very easy in most cases. Help is available from the author directly if necessary.

I would gladly demonstrate it if speelwerk's drawing had dimensions...

Regards, HansR.

Edited By Versaboss on 18/05/2016 23:40:40

Thread: Which plastic to bond to brass.
03/05/2016 22:13:58

I would also like a bit more proof that Polycarbonate can be glued well. It might depend of the type of glue - I dunno.

Btw. many of the 'non-gluable' plastics (PP, PE. Nylon) can be glued quite well, when they receive the correct treatment before.

Kind regards, Hans-R.

Thread: Wouldn't it be nice
03/04/2016 23:02:35

Interesting that nobody seems to know that drills with constant diameter shafts are available. Not cheap I admit, but these I have have almost eternal life.

Like these e.g:

drills.jpg

Regards, Hans-R.

Thread: a replacement tool to cut sheet steel.
01/12/2015 22:14:14
Posted by Roger Head on 28/11/2015 00:16:13:
Posted by Versaboss on 27/11/2015 22:03:02:

Today you can get circular saws for angle grinders and hand held saws which cut every material, including steel.

I use two (large and small) of these Kaindl products, they do what they say:

http://kaindl.de/en/home-featured/kaindl-aktions-multisage-set-topcut-o120-o160.html

Regards, HansR.

I'd be interested to hear comments on these (or similar generics). Things like 'how thin' and (ignoring the obvious mechanics of size etc) 'how thick' the sheet material can be? What about round/flat bar? What does the cut edge look like (esp. on thin sheet), how much cleanup needs to be left, etc etc.

Roger

Seems that I owe you something Roger, so here it is. Just as a test I did two cuts with the angle-grinder blade, one in a scrap bracket from 1.5 mm steel, the other a piece of 15 mm square steel. Both cuts done in say 5-10 seconds, I did not measure the time.The parts stay completely cool, and the (very small) chips are natural colour also.

Then again came the difficulty to photograph these parts, in my pictures steel never looks like steel. May be the LED lighting has something to do with that?

dscf1605 (medium).jpg

dscf1606 (medium).jpg

dscf1607 (medium).jpg

dscf1608 (medium).jpg

Regards, HansR.

27/11/2015 22:03:02

Today you can get circular saws for angle grinders and hand held saws which cut every material, including steel.

I use two (large and small) of these Kaindl products, they do what they say:

http://kaindl.de/en/home-featured/kaindl-aktions-multisage-set-topcut-o120-o160.html

Regards, HansR.

Thread: Collet Identification and info wanted please.
22/11/2015 22:02:23

Too bad you did not give more informations: total length, angle of head,keyway or not, thread metric or imp., normal or sawtooth...

In my eyes they look suspiciously like W25 collets. .

Some numbers for these: length 97.6 mm, head dia. 33.7 mm, thread (very special! sawtooth) dia, 24.7mm / 15 tpi with angles 45/5 deg., head angle 15°, keyway 5 mm

Hope this can help?

Regards, HansR.

Thread: New lathe arrived today : The ongoing saga
17/11/2015 10:38:18
Posted by Brian John on 16/11/2015 13:32:50:

...

UPDATE : minimum hole is 9mm for the 6mm indexable. Does that mean it will fit in a drilled 8.9mm hole ? I really need to know what size holes I have to drill to take the tool.

...

As you usually use a boring tool to make a hole bigger, I don't see what you mean with this question. Do you want to open 8.9 mm up to 8.95? For anything bigger your question makes no sense.

Anyway, when you (or someone else) wants to bore really small holes, there are wonderful one-piece carbide tools around. Like these e.g.:

minibore.jpg

Regards, HansR.


Edit: this is just part of the catalogue, the diameters and lengths go up from this...
 

Edited By Versaboss on 17/11/2015 10:40:40

Thread: What is the strongest way to bond styrene to polyethylene
10/11/2015 23:11:07

I can recommend the method given by David Jupp. A short waving with a gas burner until the surface looks shiny, and then gluing with a good cyanoacrilate worked perfectly for me. I have to mention that my stuff was possibly polypropylene, and black! I have lots of this stuff in about 25 mm thickness, and I needed a much thicker part for a connecting piece to the shop-vac. Still holds after several years of rough treatment!

Regards,

HansR.

Thread: New lathe arrived today : The ongoing saga
25/10/2015 15:27:40

Just went back to #1 in this thread and saw it was on Aug. 25th. Now we have Oct. 25th, so two months of almost daily entertainment. Long may it continue - it is always the first one I have a look at when I click the site.

To add something (hopefully) positive to this story, I'm quite sure that the application of a good file in strategic points would help a lot. Scraping would be over the top, both for the lathe and for Brian cheeky

Frank, may be you should add that the locking tab is the corner which is separated from the rest by a saw cut, aand also that it is the smaller part... wink

Regards, HansR.


Thread: Drilling big holes in 304 stainless steel
19/10/2015 11:41:36

1500 rpm, dia. 20 mm in stainless??? That's about 10 times too fast, imho. No wonder your drills get blunt!

Blacksmith's drills are maybe not the highest quality, but a substantial boring bar (12 mm) should have no problem, especially if you use a sharp (so-called 'Aluminium' insert.. Or even a good, sharp HSS boring bar...

Regards, HansR.

Thread: Blackening mild steel
10/09/2015 12:18:13

Usually it's not my habit to write about something I didn't check out before myself. But in this case I make an exception. I think that I've read in another forum (possible German) that it is possible to blacken steel parts by immersing in hot vinegar. Surely a simple method when (if) it works, but as said I didn't try it. But I will do on the next occasion.

Regards, HansR.

Thread: Cheapest supplier of large peices of 6802 aluminium
06/09/2015 11:59:41

Windy, I wish you every success in finding these ally lumps for a good price (and good wishes for your leg problem also...)

Should you happen to get a good offer for some round material 12" / 300 mm in say 40-60 mm thickness, I would be interested, even if the postage would be a bit expensive. But to be honest I did not look around what this would cost locally, as it is not for an immediate project..

I'm in awe what you achieve with your flash steamer!

Kind regards, HansR.

Thread: Your recommendations to a total beginner looking to use CAD software?
16/08/2015 12:18:06

Ooh, Murray, many thanks! Yes I know I'm a slow worker... and not in any way fluent with these programs.

But as far as I know your examples are all done with parametric 3D programs. What would really interest me is how it had to be done with the non-parametric programs like DraftSight etc. What I want to prove is that for a beginner the parametric programs are much simpler to work with.

Btw I also tried FreeCad, but gave up in disgust. I did not even find (in acceptable time) a way to give a dimension to a line. This program is a horrid example of 'design by a committee', tries to do all and does nothing right.

Fusion360 looks nice, I think I will add it to my toolbox also.

Regards, HansR.

15/08/2015 23:38:54

Well the thread opener brought up a question which resurfaces every couple of weeks...

So what does the total beginner really need? In my opinion one of the most important point is how easy it is to bring an idea from paper sketch (or off one's head) to the screen. Now it is my firm believe that all these programs like Turbocad, AllyFreeware, DraftSight lack very much in this respect. So I decided to set up a little challenge and hope that some of the supporters of the above (or other similar programs) will throw the gauntlet.

I started, as usual, with a 'design'. Just some lines and data on a Post-it:

design.jpg
Then I tried to convert that to a CAD drawing, using 3 different 3D programs. This remark is important because these programs are usually used to create 3D items, not simple 2D drawings.

The first one is the very small SolveSpace program. This I think was the fastest do do, maybe less than 3 minutes. One of the drawbacks is that the program expects closed forms, because you can't extrude single lines. So they are marked with 'Not closed contour...'. A small nuisance only. Also there is only one line style, although you can change colours. Could be that broken lines are possible also, but I did not find that in short time.

In all cases I did a screen dump directly after drawing, so that's not exactly what you see on a print output.

solvespace-test.jpg


Next one is from Alibre, the first version which was available for free many years ago. As I did not use this for quite a time, I needed maybe a bit longer, say 4-5 minutes:

Sorry it seems the dimensioning is not very readable.

alibre-test.jpg

The third example is from the new Onshape program. This I had to do twice, because I added twice the same dimension and couldn't find an easy way to telete one of them. Surely a problem of insufficient knowledge. For prospective users it could be important to know that Onshape still has no print (drawing) output, although it is promised to come.'very soon'. Time for this maybe also around 5 minutes.

onshape-test.jpg

The 'modus operandi' for all these programs is almost the same.

- select line tool and draw an arbitrary triangle and the horizontal line.

- constrain the latter to be horizontal

-select the measuring tool and measure the angles, then giving them the correct values

- measure the base of the triangle and giving the correct value

- if necessary tidy up the drawing by moving the dimensions around

Now I would very much like to see (in pictures and with description) how the same triangle is drawn in Turbocad and especially DraftSight!

Regards, HansR.

Thread: Arduino, Genuino ... or what Clone ?
08/08/2015 13:13:34

Last April I bought an Arduino Mega 'basic starter learning kit' from Banggood. If I can trust wha't's writen on the board, it contains a Arduine 'Made in Italy', but not marked as a a 'Genuino'.

The good things with this set: for not much more than a naked board (well even less when I look at the RS price; I paid about $40 or £27) you get a box full of goodies also. To mention the most important: 2 breadboards and a handful of connector wires, an empty shield, a LCD display, a small stepper motor wih driver (no documentation unfortunately...), an infrared sender (keyboard), several 7-segment displays, a small RC servo, and bags with LEDs, resistors, switches and and and...

OK, this is it:

**LINK**

I'm very happy with this seller (usual disclaimer)

Regards, HansR.


Thread: What did you do today (2015)
01/08/2015 22:47:52

Neil, for us simple 'point and shoot' photographers it would be very interesting to see (just) one of the original pictures, before any treatment.

Regards, HansR.

Thread: source of 600 / 1200 grit 6" diamond grinding (cup) wheels,
25/07/2015 00:15:28

Sorry for having to play spoilsport (again), but the designation 6A2 defines the wheel shape! There is an international norm for (diamond/CBN) wheek shapes, You can find them e.g. in this Norton catalog (page 5):

**LINK**

Regards, HansR.

22/07/2015 12:06:02

Well it seems the link in Dave Martin's post does not show what I wanted to explain. But it seems that in the U.S. at least they use also the mesh numbering for grinding wheels, or did I overlook something? I know that the grit numbers are given in lapping plates and similar things, though...

So a bit more 'googling' (without Google in my case). There is a FEPA (European Federation of Abrasives Producers) norm for grit sizes, and here you can find the D numbering system, although with some difficulties. The best I found is on this site from a Swiss factory:

**LINK**

This shows clearly that in the mesh system finer grits have larger numbers, whereas in the D system finer grits have smaller numbers (because they correspond roughly with the grit size in micrometers)

Numbers are the same in almost all languages, so the German text should not present too much difficulties...

Regards, HansR.

Aargh, the link goes not to the page with the tables...

OK, you can switch to English also... Then select 
Product
>
Abrasives
>
Bonded precision grinding tools in Diamond and CBN

Under 'Abrasive qualities' you can find the tables.
 

Edited By Versaboss on 22/07/2015 12:13:12

21/07/2015 22:41:14

Diamond wheels use their own grit size numbers, not the usual 600/800/1200 system. Your disk is D76, that's quite coarse. The ARC wheels are unfortunately not specified (at least not on the web page), but the ones I have are imho still too coarse for scrapers. But they are good for the pre-grinding; for finishing I recommend one of the D9 wheels from Eternal Tools :

**LINK**

But these are only 40 mm diameter, so you would need to improvise something with a small motor and spindle. Happy customer, no connection etc. etc.

Regards, HansR.

Thread: LBSC Style Ratchet Wheel Mechanical Lubricator
21/07/2015 21:47:54
Posted by John Baguley on 21/07/2015 18:24:02:

I like the Jim Ewins type where the ram goes through two O rings which seal perfectly.


As I'm thinking about building a small oil pump can someone point me to a description / plans for this Evins lubriccator? I remember vaguely having seen it long ago, but have no idea where it was.

regards, HansR.

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