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Member postings for John Hinkley

Here is a list of all the postings John Hinkley has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: aluminium sticking to end mill
23/05/2022 11:18:06

If not already, use some WD40 or paraffin for lubrication/cooling. Use a 2- or 3- flute end mill, if you're using a 4-flute one. Others will no doubt suggest an alteration to speeds and feeds as well. I use a single flute carbide cutter at 10,000rpm with a depth of cut of 1mm, but that's on a 3d router table with aluminium, with no coolant.

John

Thread: Advice on DROs for a mill
20/05/2022 16:19:31
Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 20/05/2022 15:22:45:

So from time to time I look at the mill to work out how to make and fit new table-stops. In any case, sometimes I do use the hand wheel dials alone, on short, simple tasks. If nothing else it keeps my hand in

For what it's worth, when I fitted the 3-axis DRO system to my Warco VMC mill.decided to re-instate the table stops by fitting a slotted strip on stand-offs from the front of the mill table, like this:

x-axis scale 2

This arrangement also allowed the x-axis power feed stops to be mounted on the same plate. It wasn't long however, before I found that neither were being used, so it was removed and has languished on a shelf in the workshop for 5+ years.

John

19/05/2022 10:29:01

I stumbled upon Yuri's site in about 2013, when I was looking to replace the caliper-style scales on my mini-mill. Back then he was using an Arduino board. I never pursued it any further than the initial research and reading through Yuri's site. Not been back there for ages, so I assume, without re-reading all the bumph, that the use of a TI board is relatively recent.

John

Spelling edit!

Edited By John Hinkley on 19/05/2022 10:30:22

Thread: MEW No.316 just arrived - but what is that smell?
17/05/2022 16:22:50

Hopefully, it's the sweet smell of success! No pong from my copy, either!

John

Thread: Time to Say Goodbye
17/05/2022 14:15:41

David,

I wouldn't have put it quite that strongly! Looks to me like a proof-reading error or a self incrementing template that's got out of kilter. As long as they turn up, I'm not really that bothered. I was just hoping that there wouldn't be a two month gap between issues.

John

17/05/2022 10:53:00

I'm now in a position to answer my earlier question about the June issue, as it has just plopped through the letterbox! Skipping through it, though, it seems the same thing has happened again, the July issue apparently not due until July 22nd, not June.

John

 

Edited By John Hinkley on 17/05/2022 10:53:46

Thread: pulley problem for electric motor for grinder.
15/05/2022 09:58:57

Nick,

My interpretation of the chart was slightly different, then. I looked at the bore size column and and assumed, rightly or wrongly, that the bore size is constant and the outer diameter of the bush changed to accommodate pulleys of increasing size, hence the number variations. We had better accept that each has their own view and end it there, eh?

In any case, I think the OP needs a V-section pulley from what I can (just about) see in one of his photographs and given the apparent age of the machine.

John

Edit: punctuation!

Edited By John Hinkley on 15/05/2022 09:59:43

14/05/2022 22:07:52

Nick,

I only see one 24mm and one 25mm bush on that page. My search was restricted to the Dunlop version.

John

14/05/2022 16:13:44

In your earlier post, you state that the motor shaft is 24mmØ, then above, it's grown to 25mm! I can't find a taper lock bush with a diameter of 25mm, but the Dunlop 1610-24 has a bore diameter of 24mm. The keyway in that bush is 8mm wide and 3.3mm deep.

John

13/05/2022 13:27:00

Mike,

Just dug out my hub ( a Drive-flex 1210-20 ) and there were two grub screws in with it. One was 0.370" OD x 15 tpi @ 55°, the other, maybe from a smaller hub, but still 0.350" x 32 tpi, also 55°. So it looks likely mine are 3/8". 6mm does look your better bet, as Noel says. Sorry not to be more help.

John

13/05/2022 12:45:55

Assuming you refer to taperlock pulley hubs, the ones on bearingboys.co.uk site are 1/4 inch bsw or 3/8 inch bsw.

I've got one out in the workshop, I think. I'll have a measure up after lunch, unless someone beats me to it.

John

Thread: Tyres
09/05/2022 17:03:38

Bob,

As you reside in France, is it possible that the tyre fitter misread psi for bar? 2.9 bar = 45 psi. Also, I've noticed that some tend to whack in a goodly amount of air to get the beads to seal and then forget to re-check the pressures at the end of the fitting session.

I always check the pressures when I get home, prior to re-calibrating the under-inflation system.

John

Thread: Time to Say Goodbye
09/05/2022 15:21:43

Page 29 of MEW May issue says the June issue - 316 - is due out on June 20th. Is this an error or to do with the change of ownership?

John

Thread: Easy power tailstock feed for your lathe
09/05/2022 09:31:26

You could prevent any potential wobble from an over-loose tailstock by mounting a chuck on a sliding shaft held in the tailstock taper, much like a tailsock-mounted die holder. Or, less easily, Do it like Stefan.

John

Thread: Landilift
08/05/2022 15:09:35

I also found Steve excellent to deal with when he moved all my machines from Bedfordshire to near Doncaster a couple of years ago. I read a post on here recently that said he couldn't do a particular job as he was fully booked for a few months. Maybe that was Andrew's post? Cut the guy some slack. He deserves a holiday! Try again in a week or two.

John

Thread: New To CAD? No, but....
08/05/2022 14:32:06

I have to agree with Nicholas Wheeler above, in that it appears that your basic approach is flawed. I find the drawing in your last post extremely crowded and difficult to read, possibly exaggerated by the scale. However, to prove, at least to myself, a relative newcomer to Alibre Atom, that a reasonable stab at it could be made, I devoted a whole half-hour to drawing up the following to illustrate how it could be done:

parts various

From the top, the shape of the chassis side rails, offset from the centreline by the appropriate dimension. (I had to guestimate the values, of course.) Next row: the cross-section of the rails, then sweep the cross-section along the side rail shape and then mirror about the centreline.

Third and forth rows, the cross members. That's the individual parts. Make an assembly and using constraints, align the parts to form the complete chassis, thus:

assembled chassis

In this way it is possible to build up the whole model from the separate parts as you would in real life. Rightly, or wrongly, I have got the impression that you are trying to produce the 3D model all in one go from an orthographic projection. Correct me if I've got the wrong end of the stick..

Sorry to have taken up so much space. I really am trying to help.

John

Edit: Just noticed that I've missed a crossmember out - but you get the idea,

Edited By John Hinkley on 08/05/2022 14:33:44

Thread: Myford ML7
07/05/2022 13:03:56

That link in Hopper's reply confirms what I recall. The articles are in MEW issues 210 and 211 and the conversion is, indeed, for an ML7.

John

07/05/2022 11:19:54

If I remember correctly, there was an article, probably a series, in MEW, which detailed the replacement of the bearings with taper roller ones. I believe it involved some pretty radical machining, but it is doable. Whether it was for an ML7 or a different variant, I can't be sure without further research into the archives.

John

 

Edited By John Hinkley on 07/05/2022 11:20:18

Thread: Another CAD challenge
06/05/2022 20:53:30

Did I mention that I don't watch "Coronation Street" No? Well it's on TV now, so while my wife gets her Friday fix, I thought I'd do it my way.

I sort of combined some of the previous ideas but latched onto Jason's idea to do it all in one drawing. So, I thought, how about treating it as if it were a solid casting and "machining away the unwanted bits?

First, sketch the basic profile and extrude from a mid-plane, With lugs drawn once in a separate sketch and mirrored around two planes:

doohdaah base.jpg

Then add the side extension as a solid :

doohdaah base with side piece.jpg

Followed by removing the semi-circular section :

doohdaah base hollowed out.jpg

Then "hollow out" the side pipe section:

doohdaah base with side pipe formed.jpg

Just one 3D drawing in Alibre and for export to a STEP or STL file for printing.

John

Thread: User manual for a Targa 612 surface grinder
02/05/2022 13:20:36

Further to the above, I've done a bit more digging. My grinder has a one-shot lubrication system, which I have yet to refill, so can't say what is required. Having said that, the Warco, and by implication your Targa grinder, is from the same mould as the USA Grizzly G5963 6x12 grinder. I have downloaded their manual, which is quite comprehensive and includes exploded parts drawings and that specifies ISO 68 oil for the one-shot oiling system. It also states that, apart from the obvious lubrication points, other moving parts are sealed units and need not be lubricated.

I have the pdf of the manual. If you want a copy, PM me your email address.

John

 

Edited By John Hinkley on 02/05/2022 13:22:00

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