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Member postings for martin perman

Here is a list of all the postings martin perman has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Fire bricks
22/05/2019 20:14:14
Posted by not done it yet on 22/05/2019 19:51:06:
Posted by martin perman on 22/05/2019 19:11:31:

I've been using storage heater bricks for years and until I read this I've never had problems, I suppose its all down hill from here now sad

Martin P

When they get up to temperature, they will work OK. But they will have made any metal heating rather less efficient than using the right materials for the job. A larger torch will overcome any heat loss to the bricks. Likely cost you more in gas, than buying the right material, over those (many?) years.smiley

I'm pleased to see you find it funny.

Thread: What do YOU call it?
22/05/2019 19:20:06
Posted by Derek Lane 2 on 22/05/2019 19:02:32:

If not making something I call it tidying up or sorting out ready for the next burst of energy

I have just nearly finished tidying up ready for my next project then it will be "He's in the Garage making another mess", I will actually be pondering/pottering.

Martin P

Thread: Fire bricks
22/05/2019 19:11:31

I've been using storage heater bricks for years and until I read this I've never had problems, I suppose its all down hill from here now sad

Martin P

Thread: The Chocolate Fireguard as designed by Mercedes Benz
19/05/2019 20:41:10
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 19/05/2019 20:01:59:

.

To buy diesel and petrol the customer has to make special trips to the pumps and pay a lot of overheads. Electric recharging does away with several inconveniences. Recharge points can be scattered more or less anywhere convenient, they don't have to be clustered together. They don't need to be supervised, and they don't need to be refilled. You can even refuel at home. And because it doesn't burn fuel, your car won't need to be docked regulartly to have its oil, plugs and filters changed.

Apart from the batteries...

Dave

I would slightly disagree with the above about making special trips to get our fossil fuels, I'm making a wild guess here but I would suggest that most of us here are either getting close to or are retired and if they are like me buy fuel whilst shopping, visiting family etc I never drive to a petrol station just for fuel particularly as the nearest places are four miles in either direction, and I use an AA app which tells me the cheapest price on the day and because of that I wait until I'm at 1/4 tank to maximise the saving, using vouchers from Morrisons etc. My other mode of transport is my mobility scooter used to get to the local garden centre or village shop. I do my bit in a small way. I would suggest that your vehicle still needs an MOT and servicing to keep it fit for purpose and I would also assume that as its a specialist vehicle your bills would compare similarly to mine relatively speaking.

Martin P

Thread: Aircraft General Discussion
18/05/2019 22:25:40

We had a Gazelle Helicopter over us on Thursday, a very rare sight now.

Martin P

18/05/2019 22:22:51
Posted by Brian H on 18/05/2019 21:56:06:

Driving home from Dover earlier this week I was delighted to see a B17 near Duxford. My wife tried to get a picture but it was too difficult with the terrain, the trees and other vehicles. Nice to see though.

Brian

B17G "Sally B"

Thread: Class 22 Diesel (next project)
18/05/2019 09:57:05
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 15/05/2019 10:39:32:

Batteries, automotive, leisure, and deep cycle differ in their internal construction. They all have the same construction, but:

  • car batteries are heavily optimised to deliver the short bursts of of high current needed to start an engine, and then to recharge as quickly as possible. They don't like being emptied. They are quickly spoiled when used to deliver ordinary current and/or trickle charged. They work, but have a short service life. Mass sales make them relatively cheap.
  • Leisure batteries are designed to charge and discharge at more normal rates whilst providing a sensible service life. Not ideal to empty them, so good on boats/caravans etc where they can be used overnight, and then recharged during the day. They they tend to be pricey because their construction is more expensive than that of a car battery and the market isn't as competitive as that for car batteries. Will last a lot longer on a loco than a car-battery but not the best.
  • Deep cycle batteries are like a leisure battery, but have been further optimised for deep discharge. The construction is like that of a super-leisure battery, ie more expensive.

Edited By SillyOldDuffer on 15/05/2019 10:44:00

As somebody else said theory and practice dont always match, I have just changed what I believe is the original car battery, the car was built in 2009 and the battery had a build date sticker of 2008. I changed it because if I left all the car doors opened, loading with camping gear etc or large loads, the interior lights drained it to a point where I couldn't turn the engine over but a jump start would sort it until the next time.

I have a five year old car battery which I use on my winch hauling my stationary engines in and out of my trailer from spring to summer and in between times and winter it sits on a trickle charger because I've found that the cold kills batteries unless they are constantly monitored and finally I have a leisure battery which gets used in my caravan, has started a car and generally anything else that I need 12volts for.

I also have two mobility scooters, my wifes and and mine, which sit connected to chargers all the time we dont need them.

Maybe the abuse I give them does them good.

Martin P

Thread: Electric steam lorry
17/05/2019 12:46:04

Gentlemen,

My old Mobility Scooter is getting a bit long in the tooth so yesterday I bought a second hand but hardly used replacement, I've seen at steam rallies that there is a few scooters that have been converted into 3" scale Sentinel Waggons or an A.E.C Matador truck, the scooter they use is my old one. Have any of you done this conversion and could I possibly have look at the plans please.

Martin P

Thread: The Chocolate Fireguard as designed by Mercedes Benz
13/05/2019 21:03:17
Posted by Colin Heseltine on 13/05/2019 20:34:07:

I think i'd shoot myself rather than drive 460 miles to Scotland with the cruise control set to 60.

And your point is smiley, I'm retired and not in a hurry, I spent nearly 30 years rushing around the country and abroad for work purposes and see nothing, its a real pleasure to not have to do that anymore and I can see the world go by in focus and not a blur.

Martin P

Thread: Adjustable workshop perching stool
13/05/2019 17:03:11

Am I correct in thinking it uses a wedge lock.

Martin P

Thread: The Chocolate Fireguard as designed by Mercedes Benz
13/05/2019 10:31:22

If I cruise at 70 mph the mpg takes a dive below 46 mpg, I would say that my journey was 75% motorway but as said before I have to stop every two hours to check my sugar levels, type 2 Diabetic injecting insulin. The last 100 miles from Glasgow to my destination was climbing to 350 metres, winding roads etc.

Martin P

12/05/2019 22:43:53

On Friday I left home at 05:30 and drove to Ballachulish, 460 in Scotland, I set my cruise control to 60 mph and 8.5 hrs later acheived 49.8 mpg, my car is a 2009 Subaru Forester 2.0 litre turbo diesel, I spent yesterday on the Jacobite Fort William to Mallaig steam charter and this morning I left Ballachulish at 08:15 and drove home at 70mph and got 46.2mpg, I'm more than pleased with that.

Martin P

09/05/2019 13:26:24

So to sum up on what I've read so far: My wife and I are stuffed, we are both in our sixties, my wife is an invalid and cant drive and we own a diesel car which is ten years old has low mileage and was going to see us out, we cannot afford any sort of new electric vehicle, we both have mobility scooters but cant/not allowed, no footpaths, to drive them on the roads and by the time the EV's become second hand they will require unaffordable, to me, battery packs, will have a limited range if I tow a trailer. We live in a village with a very limited bus service with five miles in any direction to buy the essentials which will cost us the earth because it will all have to be delivered. Whoopee crying

 

Martin P

Edited By martin perman on 09/05/2019 13:28:58

08/05/2019 18:43:31
Posted by pgk pgk on 08/05/2019 17:19:31:

I stand corrected. Obviously just the cars i owned that never had more than 300mile range (or the way i drove them). In any event an 8hr drive still means stops unless you have a way younger bladder or a bottle between your legs

The run to ballachulish is all motorway so nice and relaxed in self-drive. Getna green might get one into range anxiety so a short stop at scotch corner and a long stop at abingdon to preload for the trip back and it's free fuel for me (that offer has expired). The fort william supercharger isn't active yet although there are heaps of pay-for slower chargers about.

As stated in a previous post I'm legally required to stop every 2 hours to check my sugar levels so comfort breaks will be regular and I do carry a bottle for emergencies wink

Martin P

08/05/2019 16:52:24

This Friday I'm driving from Bedford to Ballachulish a distance of 440 miles, I will be most disappointed if I have to refuel along the way, I expect to have fuel left to get me to Fort William on Saturday morning.

Martin P

Edited By martin perman on 08/05/2019 16:52:55

Thread: A visit to Manchester Sci and Eng Museum
08/05/2019 11:13:19
Posted by Mark Simpson 1 on 08/05/2019 08:41:50:

If you are near Manchester then there are some great, less advertised museums..... Some of my favorites:

For textile machinery and some steam/water power Styal Mill is really good... A mile from Manchester airport **LINK** There is enough there for the non technical too

For serious Mill Engines The Northern Mill Engine Society in Bolton is great https://www.nmes.org/ Totally volunteer and especially when steaming a great day out... Easy parking and friendly people

Local favorite of mine, The Anson Engine Museum...In Poynton, south of Manchester, every kind of IC engines and some steam **LINK**. All volunteer and lots of knowledge, no idea how many engines here but way more than one hundred on display (In cold weather best to take your big coat )

All of these are heavy on exhibits, my kind of museum!

+1 for The Anson Museum, as someone who collects stationary engines I visit the museum at least twice a year for events and a look around, it and Internal Fire Museum of Power are the premier museums for big Industrial engines in this country.

Martin P

Thread: Bandsaw speed
02/05/2019 08:22:40

Here are a couple of pictures of a vertical bandsaw I recently moved on to a new home, the previous owner had modified it to slow it down. Sorry about the pictures, they are upright on my laptop.

Martin P

img_7232.jpg

img_7230.jpg

01/05/2019 21:13:15
Posted by Plasma on 01/05/2019 20:02:57:

Yes it's an Inca saw. The 32 tpi blade cuts brass no problem but seems to load up when cutting aluminium.

May need a coarser blade I guess.

I have a pair of bandsaw wheels so could have a crack at making a steel cutting saw.

Mick

Plasma,

Get your local saw doctor to make you a skip tooth blade, take your current one to him for the length and tell him what your trying to do and he should give you the correct tpi and skip tooth.

Martin P

Edited By martin perman on 01/05/2019 21:13:51

Thread: 1959 Nsu quickly
30/04/2019 18:02:09
Posted by Brian Sweeting on 30/04/2019 17:46:41:

And this has something to do with model engineering or am I missing something important?

This is also ignoring the fact that only a limited age range of members will understand "NSU Quickly".

Thats a bit strong, I dont do model engineering, I restore Stationary Engines but I use a lathe and milling machines to make parts, by the way its a moped and was quite a good one.

Martin P

Thread: The Chocolate Fireguard as designed by Mercedes Benz
29/04/2019 10:40:56
Posted by pgk pgk on 29/04/2019 10:17:08:

As to not hearng a car in a car park.. well I'm against adding some synthetic sound - it'll make little diference to the mass of folk with headsets on or starting at mobile phones or fighting with kids and shopping trolleys and is just noise pollution. There are enough varieties of electric vehicle being silent out there that the public just needs to, and will adapt. Interestingly one of the safety features of the Tesla is that if it hits a pedestrian (within certain speeds) it's supposed to explosively blow the rear 'frunk' bolts to turn the bonnet into more of a cushion.

I found it sad that you think that the public should adapt to your car, the manufacturers/owners should adapt the vehicle as its them that made it quiet, fitting flashing lights or sound alarms using proximity sensors would be cheap and easy to do.

I fitted a reversing camera to my car after spending £350 repairing my nearside rear wing when I backed into a refuse bin that I couldnt see, I still use my mirrors as well.

Martin P

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