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Member postings for Ian Abbott

Here is a list of all the postings Ian Abbott has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Motorcycle General Discussion
01/11/2015 16:48:19
Posted by Old Elan on 01/11/2015 15:10:27:A wooden framed motorcycle?

Wouldn't have thought that a good idea!

wink

Funny you should say that. Given the right circumstances, wood can be stronger and lighter than metal. And I remember seeing just recently wooden framed bicycles and somewhere a wooden motorcycle. I can't remember where, but I think it was maybe a college or university. Laminated wood and probably epoxy resin and some glassfibre.

And slightly to one side, is the fella' who's been building Brough Superior SS100s to original spec. and now has a newly designed SS00, built "…as George would have wanted…" or words to that effect. I have the web page somewhere, I'll see if I can find it. Apparently at about £50,000, which 'aint too bad, considering what a modern superbike is worth.

Can't help a bit of name dropping here, but I was born just around the corner from the site of George Brough's works in Basford, and then we moved to just up the road from Pendine, George's pile at Redhill. As teenagers we'd hang out on the bus stop bench and watch him drifting his E Type in a controlled slide out of the drive onto the A60. Just down the road was Billy Wing's Velocette dealership, a wonderfully grimy and crowded ex corner shop, where purchases weren't necessary to ensure conversation.

Ian

01/11/2015 14:54:05

A very not standard 1954 MAC Velo. Ended it's life on a very un-level level crossing at a very antisocial speed. The comments centred around, "…you walked away from that!…" albeit with a shredded Belstaff and less skin.

Just think how well Velocettes would sell now if the company could have done a Morgan.

Ian1954 mac.jpg

31/10/2015 17:58:11

Finally peripheral neuropathy forced me to quit riding. When I stopped and put and foot a down my ankle gave way. It became too embarrassing when bystanders had to keep lifting the bike off me.

The wife was upset when I sold the Royal Enfield, she loved being the tottie on the back……..

I keep thinking that I should try for something with training wheels.

Ian

Thread: Fitting a chuck to a backplate
04/09/2015 16:15:01

Could this be because of where the retaining screw holes are. The threaded holes could be either on the rim or the spigot area of the chuck and the mating faces where the bolts are should be a perfect flat mating fit.

I'm searching my memory here, the last time I did this was in 1963, but perhaps it's a start.

Ian

Thread: Aircraft General Discussion
27/08/2015 00:35:05

I think what got to me most, was that Andy Hill's family might read Flying Officer Kite's tirade. Haven't they got enough misery right now, without some bastard trying to make themselves sound impressive.

Yes, did notice that his wife is a BA pilot. The family bios were plastered on the tabloids practically before the aircraft stopped.

Ian

26/08/2015 09:01:31

Could the gizmo on the Concord(e) main wheels be what they fitted after the crash to help prevent runway debris being thrown up and into the fuel tanks?

And. I'm not familiar with the laws regarding slander/libel, but did anyone read the comments attributed to the 71 year old ex-RAF instructor about the Hunter pilot. Quite nasty I thought.

Ian

25/08/2015 17:11:56

Bob. I was going to post exactly the same thing. The heat haze from the jet pipe looks more like an engine at idle to me.

If you follow the videos and photos down, he doesn't seem to be mushing, more like nose down until the last few seconds, as if he's trying to increase speed and/or spin the turbine. With a few feet more altitude, he'd have made it to the grass on the airfield. I'd say he was deliberately avoiding buildings but didn't have the altitude to clear the road.

Ian

27/06/2015 18:28:25

Used to live on the approach/takeoff to the Rolls Royce airfield at Hucknall near Nottingham. We'd stand in the garden and watch their test Vulcan flying over at about three hundred feet with one of the Concord Olympus engines strapped under one wing. A regular sight was the RR commuter Spitfire which was stationed there.

The Vulcan take off with the Olympus wide open was quite spectacular. I can't remember now what there was, and of course never thought of taking photos, but we saw a steady stream of different aircraft types, flying in and out on test runs.

Pre Concord, so this would have been in the fifties and early sixties. We moved away in '68, so before then anyway.

When I was learning to fly in the late sixties we would do cross country hops via Hucknall and the place looked deserted then.

Ian

Thread: Drawing Projections
11/05/2015 18:44:46

I'm 68, we were taught both at school and I happily use both now, but for the life of me, I can't visualise in a thousand years measurements such as 27,493mm.

I'm much happier with 60cm than 600mm. And never 1,435mm for standard gauge, that's an insult to every pioneering British railway engineer…….

Ian

Thread: supercharged V12 2 stroke
07/12/2013 18:06:19

What Clive is on about is the General Motors 8V92. A turbo on each bank of the V8 feed a roots blower in the V. Intake is via ports in the cylinder walls and exhaust is through two normal poppet valves in the head. There's no injection pump, each cylinder has its own, camshaft driven via push rods. They're notorious for running away, so there's a panic flap on the intake, with a red knob in the cab to pull. It doesn't stop the engine, but it does give you time to select a high gear to try to stall it. It's truly frightening when one gets away.

A lot of the big trucks in the States and Canada use them, Kenworth et al.

The 8V92 designation is eight cylinders of 92 cubic inch in a V formation. That's (reaches for calculator) 736 cubic inches. About 12 litres, I think.

Ian

Thread: British Engineering Is Not Dead!
05/12/2013 17:41:01

The government will find some way to screw it up...

Ian

Thread: Hard felt alternatives for wipers?
25/05/2013 17:48:55

Should of course have been "cushion", but for some reason, the auto spell check isn't working.

Ian

25/05/2013 17:46:53

Look up Lawrence Art Supplies online. Artists use felts to cusion the plates on printing presses. They come in different weights and in small enough sizes.

Ian

Thread: Loctite shelf life
09/05/2013 18:21:02

I have a bottle of red from 1978 and it's still good. 'Sbeen out at 45 below Centigrade and 39 above, which doesn't seem to have worried it.

Ian

Thread: Are Dremel's worth the money
09/05/2013 18:15:16

I've got a couple of North American 110v Dremels from years ago, one type 4 one type 5 and a two year old 240v type 300. They all work fine, good quality. The flex shaft seems to be happier at slower speeds, but the attachments like the router and pillar drill are good quality.

I also have a Canadian cheapy 110v and a Lidl cordless. They are useful for stuff where the tool is likely to suffer. They aren't as smooth and the collets visibly wobble. My only real gripe with them though is that they don't fit all of my Dremel attachments, 'cos the body thread is different. That's understandable though.

Bottom line is, I suppose, that you get what you pay for.

Ian

Thread: Allen Key size
19/03/2013 18:55:42

Grind a larger one down to size

Ian

Thread: AHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
01/01/2013 13:32:05

The tool fairies stand on each other's shoulders to reach the door handle.

Ian

Thread: Issue 4446
01/01/2013 13:28:46

Paper copy wasn't in the newsagent's in Dartmouth yesterday, but they're supplied by W.H. Smith. I bet that there's a stack of them in the warehouse, waiting for the staff to sober up after Christmas / New Year.

Ian

Thread: Demagnetizing digital caliper?
18/11/2012 15:55:44

On my first day as an apprentice, I was in the tool store and someone came up to the counter, slapped a hammer down and said, "Demagnetise that."

'Ah,' I thought, 'you're not going to fool me with that one...'

Ian

Thread: Macs -V- Windows PC's
14/11/2012 20:41:00

"...anyone experienced their Macbook graphics boards going belly up?"

With thirteen Macs over 20 plus years, no!
Did have a mother board problem with the serial ports on a LC520 in 1992, the Mac dealer fixed it under warranty in two days.
With the public gallery where I was a director, we ran Macs and the dealer went out of his way to help us to forestall any problems. Getting anything out of Windows dealers for the two machines we had was like hitting one's head against the wall. Our present Mac dealer here in Totnes is extremely helpful in every way.
The only real problem we've had with Macs has been the laptop chargers, but then they do get a beating.
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